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From the collection of the 



Z ^ 

Pre linger 
^ Jjibrary 



San Francisco, California 
2008 



JANUARY, 1932 




blished bv the 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 
CITY OF NEW YORK 



GEORGE P. MONAGH.AJN 
Commissioner 



JANUARY 



9 5 2 





A MAGAZINE FOR POLKXML.N 



Vol 23 



No. 1 



FRANK FRISTENSKY, JR. 

First Deputy Commissioner 



Pll. Joseph A. Callohon 

Polw. Yetto Cohn 

Pll. Thomas P. Connors 



FRANK D. DOYLE 

Secretary of the Department, Editor 

CONRAD H. ROTHENGAST 

chief Inspector 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Sgl. William M. Hambrecht 



JAMES McELROY 

Chief of Sloff 



PtI. Joseph Gangi 
Det. James W. Magner 
Pll. Gerald Walsh 



-*rc«^ 



In This Issue 



EDITORIAL 

NEWSPAPER AWARDS 

107lh PRECINCT 

LINE-UP 

THE OLD FORTY. NINER 

BLUEPRINT FOR SURVIVAL 

LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

PROMOTIONS 

TOP COMMAND 

DAY'S WORK 

RETIREMENTS 

SHORT STORY 

BROWSING IN THE LIBRARY 

QUESTIONNAIRE 

GRADUATION 

STUDY HALL 

DOWN THE LINE 

LOOKING EM OVER 

AMENDMENTS 

IN MEMORIAM 

PRECINCT REPORTERS 

PtI. Michael Zapf (3rd Pet.), PtI. William Sonjour 
'8th Pet.); PtI. Charles F. Sullivan, Jr. l22nd Pet.). 
PtI. Anthony J. Lojacono (23rd Pet.); PtI. John Pel 
ler 1 25th Pet.); PtI. Roymond R. Wieboldt 28th 
Pet.); PtI. Don Crowley ond PtI. Gene Loewy 43rd 
Pet.); PtI. Nieholas Porpon (102nd Pet.i; PtI. Wil 
liom F. Burke (Trof, E); Det. Adelaide Knowles 
iPWB); Mrs. Rose Lupo (Division of Lieenses); 



Published by the Police Deportment, City of 
New York. 

Copyright, 1952, by Police Department City of 
New York. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced 

in whole or in port without written permission 

from the editor. 

Address all communications to SPRING 3100 
400 Broome Street, New York 13, N, Y 



Poge 

1 

2 
3 

6 
10 
1 1 
14 
16 
19 
20 
23 
24 
26 
27 
29 
31 
34 
36 
42-44 46-48 
47 



Letters 



Narcotics 



Deor Sir: 

We would like your permission to reprinf your 
excellent ortrcle on the identification of norcotrcs 
... in our monthly house organ. Several ranking 
officers in the department hove praised this 
article and I believe that by reprinting it our 
officers will have a better knowledge of nar- 
cotics. . . . 

Very truly yours, 
Jeremiah O'Connell 
Chief of Police 
St. Louis. Missouri 



Short Waves Short-Circuited 

Dear Sir; 

I wish to call your attention to on error in 
your December 1951 issue. . . . In your section. 
Study Hall, under the noise reduction on page 
27, the following was quoted: 

Sec. 434a-37.0. Unlawful to equip automobiles 
with Short Wave Radio without permit from 
Police Commissioner. 

The key words "set capable of receiving sig 
nols on frequencies for police use" were omitted. 

My reason for writing is not only my interest 
in amateur radio but also for better police 
and civil ion relations. 

Very truly yours, 

PtI. Walter R. Emrich, Jr. 

Boro. Hq, Rich. 



Amendments 

Dear Sir; 

Your articles in the mogozine covering func- 
tions of the various bureaus ore very interesting 
and helpful to me in my study for future od- 
voncement. Please keep publishing them. I guess 
you're a little behind on the amendments to the 
rules ond regulations and manual of procedure. 
I d like to see them in the magazine as soon 

OS possible. 

Yours truly, 
PtI. John Kenny 
46th Pet. 

'Ed, Note: With this issue. SPRING 3100 is 
almost up to dole on oil chonges. Look for 
the bolance next month.) 



Memoranda 



January, 1952 



1. NEW YEAR S DAY. 



3. ST. GEORGE ASS N Meeting Masonic Hall 

8 P.M. 



5. POLICE GARRISON 3100. Installotion. Lenox 
Mansion. 



7. N. Y. POST, VFW 1999. Meeting. School 
Hall. 8 P.M. 



9. PBA. Delegates meeting. Werdermonn Hall 
10 A.M. 



14. POLICE GARRISON 3100. Meeting Fraternal 
Clubhouse. 8:30 P.M. 

15 COLUMBIA ASSN. Meeting. Werdermonn 
Hall. 

POLICE SQUARE CLUB. Installation dinner. 
Hotel St. George- 

N. Y. C. POST, 460 AL. Meeting. Jewish 
Guild for Blind 8 PM. 

17. CIVILIAN COUNCIL Installotion dinner 
Henry Hudson Hotel 

HONOR LEGION. Installotion dinner. Pork 
Sheraton Hotel. 

21. SHOMRIM SOC. Installation dinner. Riverside 
Ploza Hotel. 



22, WM. E. SHERIDAN POST, 1059 AL Meeting 
Clubhouse 8 P.M. 



23. LIEUTENANTS' ASS N Meeting. Gov. Clinton 
Hotel. 8 PM 





FRONT COVER 


PLOTTING 


THE INCIDENT. Atom 


bomb 


"bur 


jt" is recorded on bor- 


ough 


map 


during Civil Defense 


drill. 


The planning that preceded | 


the d 


rill is 


described in article on 


page 


11 




'Ph 


3fo by 


Det James W. Magner. 




Bureau 


of Public Relotions 




From f/i58Z^^2?esfe on 



Wishful Thinking Can Never Substitute 
For Adequate Civil Defense 

THE fact that we have a Civil Defense Organization is not strictly of our 
own choosing. Some nation or nations do not see fit to play the game of 
international harmony according to accepted rules. Our Civil Defense prepara- 
tions are precautionary measures against the possible devastation of an enemy air 
raid. 

In the latter part of last November, we had an excellent opportunity to observe 
how New Yorkers were prepared to protect themselves upon the sounding of a 
Red Alert signal. I was extremely proud of the efficiency of the force and its 
volunteer assistants, the Air Wardens and the Auxiliary Police. It was particu- 
larly gratifying to know that each had performed his duty well and that our 
citizens were only too willing to follow their excellent leadership. 

We learned several lessons from that public drill. Two, in particular, are of 
special interest to our police officers because our regular force could not hope to 
cope with all the problems presented by an air attack. We will need assistance and 
it will be to the Air Wardens and the Aiixiliary Police that we will have to look. 

Our Auxiliary Police is at half-strength. Another 20,000 men are urgently 
needed. Our Air Wardens number only 60,000 although a city of our size requires 
about 200,000. These inadequate numbers could be considered as an indictment 
of the inditlerence of the city's eight million residents. Fortunately, the remark- 
able self-assurance and poise of our volunteer personnel during the recent drill 
have brought many new recruits to the precinct station houses for enrollment. 

Another difficulty in our Civil Defense program is the failure of many 
owners, managers and superintendents of apartment houses and smaller multiple 
dwellings to appoint a building control director. These directors have the respon- 
sibility of providing protection for the occupants of their buildings. 

In this phase of the program, the members of the force can be of great 
assistance. An extremely high percentage of our members reside in apartment 
houses. In the interest of all, you might still profitably advise the owners of these 
unprotected buildings of the desirability of providing this essential service. 

With every news report of the possible peaceful settlement of the Korean 
campaign, interest in Civil Defense seems to decline. But we in the City of New 
York must be ever mindful of the broader aspects of international crises; and 
until such time as the Federal Government tells us that there is no longer a need 
for Civil Defense, let us mould ours as closely to perfection as is humanly possible. 



Lueorqe / . 1 1 lonagli 



an 

COMMISSIONER 



Captor of Driiii'Crazed^ Armed Trio 
Wins Journal- American Award 




PATROLMAN JOSEPH E. MAHON and his mother, Mrs. Jessie 
Mahon (left) look on as his wife, Jeanne receives the cash 
award from Commissioner Monaghan. The Mahon children, 
Joseph, held by Mrs. Mahon, and William, on the arm of the 
Commissioner, are wide-eyed at the goings on. 

T_riS selection as the winner of the Journal-American 
■'■ -*• Public Protector Award for November helped to 
insure a merry Christmas season for Patrolman Joseph E. 
Mahon, 25th Precinct. On Saturday, December 8, in the 
presence of Mahon's mother, Mrs. Jessie Mahon ; his wife, 



Jeanne, and their two children Joseph III, 3, and William 2, 
Police Commissioner George P. Monaghan made the 
presentation at Police Headquarters. 

Mahon was on post at about midnight last November 9, 
in the vicinity of 123rd Street and Madison Avenue, when 
he heard gunfire. Going in the direction of the shots, he 
was told that three men had fired at another in a Madison 
Avenue apartment house and had then raced away on foot. 
Mahon took off after them and came upon the trio near 
the 125th Street Station of the New York Central Railroad. 
He called upon them to surrender, whereupon one pulled 
a gun and another, a knife. At that moment two plainclothes 
officers happened on the scene. The first knocked down the 
gun toter and disarmed him, while Mahon grappled with 
and subdued the felon with the knife. The third man sur- 
rendered' timidly. 

Interrogation at the station house disclosed that the 
three were drug addicts, who had broken into the apart- 
ment looking for money and narcotics. They had fired at 
the occupant of the apartment when he protested that he 
had neither. 

Patrolman Mahon, a member of the force for two years, 
lives with his family at 250 East 180th Street, Bronx. 
During World War II he served in the Pacific Theater as 
an aerial gunner in the Marine Corps. 



Public Relations- 1907 Style 



IN HIS book, "A Penny from Heaven," Max Winkler 
tells of his experiences from the time he immigrated to 
America until he reached his present position as head of 
Belwin, Inc., one of the largest music publishing firms in 
the world. The following excerpt is from th^e condensed 
version appearing iti the September 1951 issue of the Read- 
er's Digest. 

It was February, 1907 when Winkler and his two broth- 
ers first saw the Statue of Liberty. In those days, the 
United States had no quota and immigrants were arriving 
on almost every boat. He describes his first experience in 
New York City : 

When the authorities had finished with us, we stepped 
ashore, found a bench in Battery Park, sat down and looked 
around. There before my eyes was the tremendous city, 
bigger, nosier, more terrifying than any of us had ever 
imagined. How were we ever to become a part of this 
forbidding, strange world ; how could we ever be at home 
among these people rushing around on unknown errands, 
speaking a language we didn't know? Never before had I 
felt so alone. 



From what Father had given us we had only $12.18 
left. And we had the address of Aunt Minnie, my father's 
sister. But how to get there? 

A policeman stopped at our bench swinging a stick. We 
got up in terror. All our lives we had known that a police- 
man could only mean trouble. Something we were doing 
was surely verbotcn and here was the law to enforce it. 

"Where do you fellows want to go?" the policeman 
asked us in German. 

I was overwhelmed. What a wonderful question! How 
did he know that we didn't speak English? 

I took out my little black book and showed him Aunt 
Minnie's address. "That's a long way from here. You 
fellows got 15 cents?" 

"Ja, ja, ja !" we answered in rapid succession. 

"Come on — I'll show you," and he led us to the elevated 
station, told us which train to take and where to get off. 
The train came roaring into the station. "Goodbj'e boys," 
we heard the policeman say as we scrambled aboard, "and 
good luck to you!" I kept thinking what a welcome to the 
new continent! 



{Reprinted with the permission of The Reader's Digest and Appteton-Century-Crafts, Inc., publishers.) 

— 2 — 



Welcome, 107th 



NEW PRECINCT OPENED IN QUEENS 

^^T 3 P.M. on November 20, Police Commissioner 
George P. Monaghan hoisted an American flag over two 
stores at 180th Street and Union Turnpike in Queens, to 
signalize the opening of the newly-established 107th Pre- 
cinct. An hour later, the first group of patrolmen marched 
from the precinct to take up their patrol posts serving 
Jamaica Estates, Fresh Meadows, Flushing-Hillcrest, Kew 
Gardens and several other adjoining areas. 

The precinct was carved out of the areas of surrounding 
precincts in order to provide more police protection for the 
population which has greatly increased during the past ten 
years. Captain Walter Kuntzman was designated by the 
Commissioner to command the 147 men, assigned to the 
precinct. A quota of 161 men has been set and will be 
filled as more men are added to the force. 

The creation of the new 107th Precinct in north Queens 
and its establishment in a row of reconditioned stores on 
Union Turnpike caused SPRING 3100 to do a little re- 
search on how the city goes about obtaining new quarters 
for its Police Force. 

The most recent, newly constructed station house was the 
66th Precinct which was opened on November 28, 1949. 
The chronological history of the eighteen years from the 
time the precinct was created until the new building was 
opened might not be repeated in the case of the 107th Pre- 
cinct, but it does indicate the general pattern. 

There are now two rented station houses in the city — 
the new 107th Precinct and the 111th Precinct in Bayside. 
Plans for a new building for the Bayside Precinct are now 
being drawn. Forty years ago, nineteen buildings were 
leased from private individuals as station houses. 



I HE planning and construction of buildings for depart- 
mental use have been the responsibility of the Building and 
Repair Bureau since 1923 when the name was changed 
from the Division of Repairs, Quartermaster's Department. 
Prior to that, the unit was known as the Bureau of Repairs 
and Supplies. 

The revised New York City Charter which went into 
effect on January 1, 1938 made a procedural change with 
respect to buildings constructed after that date. The new 
charter specifically charged the Department of Public 
Works with the construction activities for all buildings 
erected by the City of New York. With respect to Police 
Department buildings, this change continued the responsi- 
bility for planning in the Building and Repair Bureau. 
Architectural design and erection came within the scope 
of the Department of Public Works. 

The 66th Precinct was created on May 18, 1931, at which 
date it took up quarters in a one-family house at 1430 49th 
Street, Brooklyn. The territory assigned to the new pre- 
cinct was originally carved out of portions of the Fourth 
Avenue (68th), Parkville (70th), Bath Beach (62nd) and 
Fort Hamilton (64th) Precincts. 

(Continued on next page) 

POLICE COAAMISSIONER MONAGHAN raises the Stars and 
Stripes over the new Queens precinct. 




— 3 



Once the Police Commissioner had determined to create 
a new precinct, the next problem facing the department 
was the obtaining of quarters within the precinct's con- 
fines for a station house. The immediate erection of a 
new building was precluded by the formalities required. 
The time required to construct a new building under the 
Capital Budget made it necessary to rent quarters in the 
interim. 

Many people regard the city as an impersonal agency, but 
it is surjjrising how closely the city resembles an ordinary 
individual when it seeks to rent or buy something. The 
housewife in the process of shopping must choose from 
among many articles which dififer in size, shape and 
quality. At the same time, she must weigh them in relation 
to their cost and the condition of her personal budget. The 
city, through its various departments, does the same — 
with the possible differences that the final decision requires 
the approval of several other units and bureaus, whereas 
the housewife herself makes the final decision. 

Pattern of Location 

The obtaining of leased quarters for the 66th Precinct 
Station House followed a definite pattern. First, a map of 
the new precinct was obtained and diagonal lines were 
drawn thereon from corner to corner. The point at which 
the lines crossed represented the geographical center of the 
precinct, approximately 52nd Street and 13th Avenue. An 
area extending two blocks in all directions from the 
geograhical center was designated as the territory within 
which the station house would be leased. A survey of all 
vacant buildings from 11th to 15th Avenues and from 48th 
to 56th Streets was conducted. By a process of elimination, 
six buildings were deemed suitable. All were one family 
dwellings but one had previously been used as a branch 
library. On July 23, 1930, the Police Commissioner re- 
quested the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund (now the 
Board of Estimate) to provide temporary quarters in the 
building at 1430 49th Street which in the opinion of the 
Building and Repair Bureau was best suited to the needs 
of the department. 

THE NEW BLOTTER is officially opened by the Police Commis- 
sioner as Deputy Mayor Charles Horowitz, Chief of Detectives 
George A. Loures representing Chief Inspector Rothengast, 
and Captain Walter H. Kuntzmann look on. 




The Commissioners of the Sinking lund considered the 
request at their meeting of September 24, 1930 and it was 
referred to the Comptroller for report. On October 6, 1930, 
the Bureau of Real Estate, Department of I'inance, advised 
the Police Commissioner that the building which he had 
selected had been rented in the meantime, and was not 
available to the City. This necessitated a resurvey of the 
area by the Building and Repair Bureau. Based on its sup- 
plementary report, the Police Commissioner supplied the 
Commissioners of the Sinking Fund with four possible 
locations — two of which were dwellings and two were busi- 
ness properties with a store on the first floor and apart- 
ments above. This request of the Police Commissioner was 
considered at the November 12, 1930 meeting of the Sink- 
ing Fund, and it was again referred to the Comptroller for 
report. On November 21, the Bureau of Real Estate, De- 
partment of Finance, advised the Police Commissioner that 
the rentals of the buildings submitted were excessive, and 
suggested that he consider occupying a few rooms in an- 
other building which at that time was being used for 
dancing and recreational activities. 

Building and Repair Bureau Survey 

A survey by the Building and Repair Bureau found that 
the suggested building would in no way be suitable for 
station house purposes. With respect to the space available 
for a locker room, the report stated, "in order to get into 
the proposed locker room, it would be necessary to pass 
through a bowling alley that at the present time is leased 
for one year." The Police Commissioner informed the 
Bureau of Real Estate, Department of Finance on December 
24, 1930, that the suggested location was not acceptable. 
On February 9, 1931, the Department of Finance advised 
the Police Commissioner that the building which he had 
originally submitted on July 23, 1930, had been vacated 
and was now available for lease. 

The March 4, 1931 meeting of the Commissioners of the 
Sinking Fund took up the renewed request of the Police 
Commissioner, but laid the matter over for several weeks. 
Finally, on April 8, 1931, the Commissioners of the Sink- 
ing Fund approved the leasing of the original building. The 
report of the Comptroller, upon which the approval was 
based, read in part : 

The rental of $1500 per annum is of the rate of 42 cents 
per square foot, and is the most reasonable obtainable in 
the vicinity. 

The necessity of this lease arises from the fact that the 
Police Department has informed this Bureau it is in urgent 
need of a station house in the Borough Park section of 
Brooklyn, which in recent years has become so populated 
that the nearest station house is too small to accommodate 
the increase in personnel, and information received from 
the Police Department is to the effect that there are 125 
policemen to be assigned to the new station house. 
The lease, as finally consumated, was for a two year 
jieriod with an option for renewal for an additional year 
at the same rental. Possession of the premises was obtained 
on April 21, 1931, and with the completion of the necessary 
repairs and the installation of furniture and equipment, 
the l)uikling was made available for occupancy. On May 
IS, 1931. the 66th IVecinct officially came into existence. 

The Building and Repair Bureau had little further con- 
cern with the new precinct until January 17, 1933 when 
the Police Commissioner received a communication from 
the Bureau of Real Estate. It called attention to the expir- 
ing lease, and stated, "In view of the economic conditions 
now existing, it is suggested that this activity be either 
housed in some city-owned property if available, or dis- 



— 4 — 



continued in order to effect a savings in rent." This com- 
munication was referred by the Police Commissioner to 
the Building and Repair Bureau which stated in its report, 
"It being impossible to obtain funds for the erection of a 
new building to replace the present leasehold premises as 
was intended at the time lease was first negotiated, and to 
my knowledge no other suitable city-owned property is 
available for this purpose, respectfully recommended that 
leases of premises No. 1430 49th Street, Borough of 
Brooklyn, be renewed for a period of one year. . . ." 

The Commissioners of the Sinking Fund approved the 
new lease on March 15, 1933, but the rental was reduced 
to $1200. Periodic lease renewals followed in the sub- 
sequent years with the annual rental acting as a barometric 
reflector of economic conditions. From 1933 to 1938, the 
rental remained at $1200 per year; in 1939 it dropped to 
$1100. In 1941, it returned to $1200 on a two year lease, 
but reverted in 1943 to $1140. In 1945 it went back to 
$1200 again, and then rose to $1380 in 1946. This latter 
increase represented a fifteen per cent increase under the 
emergency rent laws. 

Ultimate Replacement 

Despite the continuance of the rental arrangement, prep- 
arations were under way for the replacement of the leased 
premises with a city-owned building. The 1942 Capital 
Budget carried an item of $5500 for the preparation of 
plans for the 66th Precinct Station House. The precinct 
was surveyed by representatives of the Bureau of Real 
Estate and the City Planning Commission ; the Acting 
Superintendent of Buildings represented the Police De- 
partment. Four possible sites were selected. 

On April 3, 1943, the Police Commissioner sent a com- 
munication to the Mayor requesting the acquisition of a 
site at 59th Street and 16th Avenue for the new station 
house. The Board of Estimate at its meeting of May 6, 
1943 referred the request to the City Planning Commis- 
sion, to the Director of the Budget and to the Director of 
Real Estate. 

The reports submitted by each of these agencies tell the 
story of what transpired. On June 16, 1943, the City Plan- 
ning Commission approved the selection of the plot and 
stated : 

"On December 16, 1942, the City Planning Commission 
adopted, as a part of the Master Plan, the area bounded 
by 48th Street, 12th Avenue, 60th Street, and 16th Avenue, 
Borough of Brooklyn, as the area within which the new 
66th Police Precinct Station House is recommended to be 
located. The proposed site lies within this area." 
The director of Real Estate in his approval of August 
20, 1943 stated : 

"The Director of Real Estate advertised such area in 
The City Record from January 4 to January 20, 1943, in- 
viting all owners therein to submit offers to sell. The site 
now selected was ofFered to the City at $5500. 

The Bureau of Real Estate requested the Brooklyn Real 
Estate Board to appraise said property and they have cer- 
tified that the ready sale value thereof as of June 23, 
1943, is $4800. The said owner has now ofFered to sell 
said property to the City for the amount of the appraised 
valuation, $4800 provided that the City assumes the taxes 
from July 1, 1943." 
On July 6, 1943, the Director of the Budget added his 
approval of the purchase : 

"The 66th Precinct is an important one, the present 
quarters are entirely inadequate and a new building on 
the site recommended would fit into any comprehensive 



plan which might be developed. 

Although the project is to be constructed in the post-war 
period, it would appear advisable in this instance to take 
advantage of the low offered price, and acquire the prop- 
erty now. 

No provision is made in the 1943 Capital Budget for 
authorization of additional funds for this site acquisition, 
but the cost is relatively low, and may be met from the 
Real Property Fund." 
At its meeting of September 9, 1943, the Board of Esti- 
mate approved the acquisition of the site and authorized 
the Director of Real Estate to purchase it at private sale 
at a price not to exceed $4800. Title to the property was 
conveyed on November 18, 1943 and on July 20, 1944, 
$6000 was authorized for the preparation of plans and 
specifications. The expenditure of the original items of 
$5500 in the 1942 Capital Budget for this purpose was 
never authorized. The Capital Budget is merely a sched- 
ule of proposed improvements. It carries no appropria- 
tion, but requires a specific authorization of funds by the 
Board of Estimate. 

On August 26, 1948, the Board of Estimate adopted a 
resolution approving the plans, the amended specifications, 
and the estimated aggregate cost of $222,250 for general 
construction, plumbing, heating, and electrical work. Sealed 
bids were received on these four classifications on October 
27, 1948, and they aggregated $247,250. 

Approval of Bids 

The Commissioner of Public Works advised the Board 
of Estimate on November 3, 1948 that "It is our opinion 
that a re-advertisement at this time would not result in the 
receipt of any lower bids." The Board approved the addi- 

(Continued on page 33) 




MAP USED TO PLOT geographical center of the 66th Precinct 
in Brooklyn. 



— 




To ihc two thousand detectives in the department, the 
Hne-up is almost a daily occurrence. Not so, however, 
with the 1,700 recruits who have joined the force in 
the past year. The procedure followed at the line-up can 
probably stand some refreshing in the minds of new offi- 
cers, particularly those who have not yet made their first 
felony arrest. Outlined here are the successive actions that 
take place from the time the arresting officer books his 
prisoner in tlir ])recinct of arrest until he leaves the line-up 
for court. 

The Manual of Procedure re(]uires the holding of the 
daily line-up, while the Rules and Regulations specify the 
various categories of prisoners who are to appear in the 
line-up. 

Rule 360 provides: "Persons arrested charged with fel- 
ony or thievery, or any of the misdemeanors or offenses 
mentioned in Section 5.^2 of the Code of Criminal Proce- 
dure, or professional thieves and known criminals charged 
with misdemeanors, shall be taken without unnecessary de- 
lay to the precinct detective office for the purpose of identi- 
fication. All such persons who have been arrested, and are 
still in custody of the police, shall be delivered to the De- 
tective Division, Police Headquarters, Manhattan, not later 
than 8 A.M., the next day . . ." 

In every case of an arrest made by a member of the uni- 
formed patrol force for a felony or other crime or offense 



requiring fingerprinting, a precinct squad detective in the 
precinct of arrest fingerprints the prisoner, obtains his pre- 
vious criminal record and assists the uniformed officer at 
the precinct and at the line-up, and in the presentation of 
the case in court. 

At the time that the detective fingerprints the prisoner 
at the precinct detective office, the arresting officer must 
check with the desk officer whether there is a line-up sched- 
uled for the following day and also whether the prisoner 
falls into the category of those designated to appear in such 
line-up. The precinct desk officer is charged with the re- 
sponsibility of transmitting immediately the fingerprint 
forms (D.D. 18) to the Bureau of Criminal Identification. 
In those instances where a felony arrest is made after the 
line-up has been concluded, and while court is still in ses- 
sion, the prisoner is brought to the Photo Gallery for pho- 
tographing before appearing in court. 

Under Article 12, paragraph 191, of the Manual of 
Procedure, the Chief nt Detectives is called upon to "con- 
duct a line-up of prisoners specified in Rule and Regula- 
tion 360, daily, except Sundays and holidays, at 9:00 A.M., 
in the "Line-up" Gallery, Police Headquarters, Manhattan. 
Such prisoners will be delivered through the linc-up en- 
trance to Police Headijuarters, in the rear of building, on 
Centre Market Place. A member of the force in civilian 
clothes delivering a prisoner to the line-up shall wear his 



— 6 



shield on his oiitt-rmost garment over the left breast while 
in Centre Market Place and Police Headquarters." 

In the event that the prisoner is to be brought to the 
line-up, the precinct messenger who carries the fingerprint 
forms to headquarters need not wait for the prints to be 
checked. If there is no line-up scheduled or if the prisoner 
is not to appear, the precinct messenger waits for the prints 
to be checked and returns to the precinct with the Prisoner's 
Criminal Record (D.D. 24). 

In those cases where the prisoner is to appear at the line- 
up, the Bureau of Criminal Identification sends the Prison- 
er's Criminal Record (in duplicate) to the waiting room of 
the Photo Gallery in Police Headquarters' basement. Be- 
cause of the numerous felony arrests that are made daily in 
New York City, the Commanding Officer of the Bureau of 
Criminal Identification causes only the more important 
cases to be scheduled for the actual line-up. These are item- 
ized on the Line-up Sheet (D.D. 1), a copy of which is sent 
upstairs to the superior officer scheduled to conduct the 
line-up interrogation. Each case entered on the line-up sheet 
is assigned a number and the cases are numbered consecu- 
tively within each borough. This applies in all boroughs ex- 
cept Richmond, which is included under the Queens listing. 

The paragraphs that follow review the actual line-up 
processing of prisoners. Sketches 1 and 2, on page 9, show 
the layout of Police Headquarters' basement and Line-up 
Gallery. 

UPON arrival in Centre Market Place, the arresting offi- 
cer takes his prisoner from the patrol wagon, through 
the line-up entrance into headquarters' basement, and along 
the corridor to the Photo Gallery. The Commanding Offi- 
cer of the Bureau of Criminal Identification is seated at a 
desk just inside the entrance to the Photo Gallery's waiting 
room. Upon this desk are arranged, according to precinct, 
the criminal records of all prisoners scheduled to be de- 
livered to headquarters for that day's line-up. The arresting 
officer, as he approaches this desk, calls out the precinct 
number and the prisoner's name. The Commanding Officer 
of the Bureau of Criminal Identification, after checking the 
list of prisoners, directs the officer either to escort his pris- 



oner to the Line-up Gallery or to have the prisoner sit on 
one of the benches in the waiting room of the Photo Gallery. 

If the prisoner is going to the line-up, the arresting offi- 
cer is now given the Prisoner's Criminal Record (D.D. 24), 
a Pedigree Slip fD.D. 19) and a white card showing the 
borough designation and number. If the prisoner is not 
being sent to the line-up, the officer is given only the Crim- 
inal Record and the Pedigree Slip. 

If the prisoner is going to the line-up, he is escorted by 
the arresting officer through the doorway at the other end 
of the waiting room, then along the corridor through a 
barred and guarded door to the special elevator located on 
the right-hand side of the corridor. This elevator runs di- 
rectly to the Line-up Gallery. Emerging at the left rear of 
the Line-up Gallery, the officer escorts his prisoner down 
the left aisle and lodges him in the detention pen located 
behind the line-up platform. After making note of the 
prisoner's line-up number, the arresting officer delivers the 
white card to the detective guarding the entrance of the 
detention room. It is from these cards that the order of 
appearance of prisoners is announced. The arresting officer 
then seats himself outside the detention room until his case 
is called, e.g., "Bronx Four" or "Manhattan Two." Upon 
hearing his case called, he takes a position outside the de- 
tention room and stands with his prisoner until it is the 
prisoner's turn to mount the line-up platform. At this time, 
the officer walks around to the rear of and takes his place 
at the right of the rostrum, from which the superior officer 
conducting the line-up is questioning the prisoners. While 
most of the questions are directed to the prisoner, the ar- 
resting officer should be prepared to answer any questions 
asked of him. The Prisoner's Criminal Record (D.D. 24) 
should be kept ready in case it is asked for. When the 
line-up officer calls "step down" to the prisoner, the arrest- 
ing officer moves to the opposite end of the line-up plat- 
form and escorts the prisoner down the right aisle to the 
rear of the room. 

When the prisoner is a female, there is a slight variation 
in the procedure in the Line-up Gallery. Females are not 
placed in the detention room prior to their appearance on 
the line-up platform. Instead they are turned over to a 

(Continued on next page) 



PRISONER AND ARRESTING OFFICER about to enter elevator to Line-up Gallery (left). Arresting officer picks up papers upon 
entry to Photo Gallery waiting room (center). Prisoner is weighed by arresting officer (right). 





ARRESTING OFFICER with interrogator in Line-up Gallery while 
prisoner is on platform. 




ARRESTING OFFICER waiting with prisoner outside detention 
pen before prisoner mounts line-up platform. 

PATROL WAGONS lined up on Centre Market Place for deliv- 
ery of prisoners to court after line-up. 




LINE-UP 



(Continued) 



lioliciwoiiiaii Stationed at tiie left front of the Line-np Gal- 
lery who is char|;ed with liiiarding the prisoner until the 
interroijation is completed. 

.After descending from the platform the prisoner, male 
or female, is escorted into the special elevator and back to 
the waiting room of the Photo Gallery in headquarters' 
basement. 

The processins; of all prisoners in the Photo Gallery — 
whether or not they appeared in the line-up — is identical. 
The arresting officer, with the prisoner at his side, stands 
at the glass-topped table in the center of the waiting room 
to fill out the Pedigree Slip (D.D. 19). A .scale and a height 
recorder are available in the waiting room to assist the offi- 
cer in recording the prisoner's correct weight and height. 

After the Pedigree Slip has been filled out, the prisoner 
is seated on one of the benches and the arresting officer 
takes the Pedigree Slip (D.D. 19), the Prisoner's Criminal 
Record (D.D. 24) and the History of Case (State Depart- 
ment of Correction Form) to the desk just outside the en- 
closure where the photos are taken. Here the forms are 
checked by a member of the Bureau of Criminal Identi- 
fication to insure that the information on them is complete. 
In the event that the prisoner has a "B" number assigned 
upon a previous arrest, it appears on the D.D. 24 and need 
only be copied onto the Pedigree Slip and onto the upper 
right hand corner of the History of Case form. This is a 
good time to make a note of the "B" number which is nec- 
essary for the Known Criminal Card File (D.D. 52-A) 
maintained in the detective squad office. The arresting offi- 
cer now goes through the wire mesh door into the enclosure 
containing the cameras and gives the Pedigree Slip to the 
member of the force who is recording "B" numbers in the 
"B" Number Book. The Pedigree Slip is subsequently for- 
warded by this member to the Bureau of Criminal Identi- 
fication for file with the prisoner's record. The arresting 
officer retains the Prisoner's Criminal Record (D.D. 24) 
and the History of Case form. He then returns to the wait- 
ing room and remains with his prisoner. When the prison- 
er's name is called by the photographer, the prisoner is es- 
corted through the wire mesh door to have profile and full- 
face photographs taken. An identification plate, bearing the 
prisoner's assigned "B" number is pinned to his outside 
garment before the photo is taken. The arresting officer 
should check to be sure that the plate bears the correct 
number. 

If more than one prisoner has been arrested — or where 
certain specific types of crimes are involved, e.g., robbery, 
arson, abortion and other sex offenses — a stand-up photo 
of the group inust also be taken. After the bust photos have 
been taken, the group of prisoners is photographed to- 
gether in the studio on the other side of the partition. 
When all photographs have been completed, the prisoner 
is escorted back through the corridor through which he 
originally entered the basement. The arresting officer in- 
forms the detective on duty there as to the court where the 
prisoner is going. As soon as the detective in the corridor 
has a group — all headed for the same court — large enough 
to fill a patrol wagon, he will open the gate. The prisoners 
are iIkmi pl.iced in the patrol wagon for delivery to court. 



SPRING 3100 gratefully acknowledges the assist- 
ance of Acting Captain Daniel C. Murphy of the 
Bureau of Criminal Identification in the preparation 
of this article. 



Sketch 1— Police Headquarters Basement 



SKETCH No. 1 



il 



^5 






®=l 



t-V |tlHil|i|lii| i. IP liHImlUi.M ,, *P 



R '"'■'■ ■ ■ ^' ' P'".'"'""J 'lll 




A— Line-up entrance to headquarters 

B— Photo Gallery waiting room 

C— Desk of Commanding Officer, BCI 



D— Benches for prisoners 
E— Pedigree table 
F-Scale 

Sketch 2— Line-up Gallery 



G— Line-up elevator 
H— Individual photo camera 
I— Group photo camera 




J— Line-up elevator 
K— Detention pen 



L— Chairs for female prisoners 
— 9 — 



M— Line-up platform 

N— Interrogator's Rostrum 



m 



The Old Forty-Niner 
Digs For The Story 



From: The Old Forty-Niner. 

To: You. 

Subject: BEALE, HENNESSEY, HUGHES AND YOUNG. 

It sounded like a good story. The item was only one of many that Patrol- 
man Ray Weiboldt , precinct reporter for the 28th Precinct , had sent in for his 
November column, but it caught the eye of the Old Forty-Niner, ace reporter of 
SPRING 3100. It read this way: "If Dick Beale ever tries to wear all his depart- 
mental decorations, either his blouse or his shoulder will give way-"Diamond" 
Dick already is well up in double figures in citations. " 

"Any guy who wins that many citations is worth a blow in SPRING 3100," the 
Old Forty-Niner said. "I shall investigate and report my findings forthwith 
on a 49. " First he called Patrolman Weiboldt who hastened to confirm the story. 
"While you're at it," he added, "there are a couple of other guys who aren't 
doing too badly either. There's Johnnie Hennessey, who's Dick Beale 's partner 
in the car and then there's Joe Hughes who's got a million of them, too. They 
don't have as many as Dick but they've got an awful lot between them." 

The Old Forty-Niner now hot on the trail thanked Weiboldt for his excel- 
lent reporting and cautiously called Captain Boland, the commanding officer. 

"Captain," he began, "SPRING 3100 has heard about three of your men who seem 
to have cornered the market on awards. We'd like very much to get their pictures. " 

"You've got a fine idea there;" the captain said, "those men are excellent 
police officers and it's a wonderful thing to let the department know about them. 
Say when, and I'll have them ready and waiting for you." 

The Old Forty-Niner made an appointment for the next day at 11 A.M. A little 
while later, the captain called back. "We'll have to make a change in those plans. 
Beale has an appointment with the Honor Committee for another citation and Hughes 
and Hennessey are due in Felony Court on arrests they made." "Wouldn't you know 
it," the Forty-Niner said under his breath. "It's going to be impossible to 
get these guys when they're all free." However, the appointment v.as finally ar- 
ranged, over the weak protests of the Old Forty-Niner, for the crack of dawn on the 

(Continued on page 33} 



Left: Captain Boland congratulates PtI. 
Richard Beale for having been awarded 
his eleventh departmental citation. John 
Hennessey, standing next to Beale, is his 
partner on RMP duty and has six awards 
and Joe Hughes, extreme right, is the 
proud possessor of eight citations. 




Right: Another honor man in the 28th Pet. 
is Arthur Young who has garnered nine 
citations during his career in the depart- 
ment. 




10 — 



BLUEPRINT F" 



CAREFUL PLANNING PAYS OFF 
IN CIVIL DEFENSE DRILLS 




ARCHIMEDES, the famous Greek mathematician and 
physicist, is credited with having remarked, "Give 
me a lever long enough and a fulcrum strong enough, 
and single-handed I can move the world." Not so long ago, 
Civil Defense Director Arthur W. Wallander,. in effect, 
said the same; and when he had the requisite essentials, he 
proceeded to move all of New York oft' the streets and 
into air raid shelters. His fulcrum was the ten-minute pub- 
lic participation drill of November 28; his lever was the 
Police Emergency Division of the Civil Defense Organiza- 
tion. 

From Harlem, Herald Square, Borough Hall, the gar- 
ment area and ninety-six other locations throughout the city 
where official observers were posted, the reports were al- 
most all identical : — "excellent," "almost perfect," "han- 
dled without incident," "perfectly executed." Perhaps the 
essence of the drill was best summed up by the visiting civil 
defense director of New Jersey. "It's an amazing thing," 
he said, "how a city will cooperate if plans are properly 
laid and carried through. If you don't have the proper 
plans and trained personnel, you would have a shambles if 
a disaster occurred." 

The public participation drill of November 28 had as its 
prelude a civil-defense force drill, two weeks earlier. New 
York City's two drills had their inception on August 13 
when Mayor Vincent R. Impellitteri directed the heads of 
the various emergency divisions within the Civil Defense 
Organization to designate a deputy commissioner to serve 
on a committee that would plan a city-wide test. 

First Deputy Police Commissioner Frank Fristensky, Jr., 
as the representative of Police Commissioner George P. 
Monaghan, sat in on the various preliminary sessions, and 
the results of the committee's deliberations were made 
known in a directive of October 23. There would be two 
air raid drills during the month of November. The first 
would be on a pre-determined date and would test the 
response of the civil defense forces. The one in the latter 
part of the month would be in the nature of a modified 
"surprise" and would test the general public's cooperation. 

At 7 :30 P.M. on November 14, the Red Alert for the 
first drill sounded. Only the civil defense forces took part. 
Pedestrians and vehicular trafffc were not interfered with. 
Theoretical incidents, including two atom bomb bursts, oc- 
curred in the five boroughs. The communication report 



centers were manned and typical damage reports were pro- 
cessed. In addition to the Air Wardens and the Auxiliary 
Police, personnel from the Fire, Medical, Public Works 
and other emergency divisions participated. 

After the All Clear signal, the three prinicpal groups of 
the Police Emergency Division — the Uniformed Force, the 
Air Warden Service, and the Auxiliary Police — mobilized 
prior to final dismissal. Off-duty members of the Police 
Force, to the extent of 11,739 men and women of all ranks, 
reported to the station houses of the precincts in which they 
were at the time. Allowing for men out of town on vaca- 
tion, or unable to report because on sick report, or assigned 
to the various report centers, or performing regular police 
duty at the time of the drill, almost the entire Police Force 
responded in accordance with the mobilization plan. 

The second or "surprise" drill was announced for the 
week of November 25. Through the excellent cooperation 



POLICE. Traffic patrolman and rookie keep watch over a "still" 
city at Madison Avenue and East 57th Street. 




— 11 — 



of the press, and the radio and television stations, there was 
not a resident in the city who was not aware of the coming 
drill. As proof of this, on the morning of the test, no calls 
were received at Police Headquarters from persons alarmed 
by the sounding of the sirens. 

With the arrival of the week within which the test was 
scheduled, it was announced that it could be expected during 
the morning of either November 28 or November 29. Be- 
cause this was merely a practice drill, it was decided that 
the members of the Police Force would remain on the 
street during its entirety rather than to seek shelter after 
the streets were cleared, as they would do in the event of 
an actual alert. As a further precaution, the Acting Chief 
Inspector ordered an emergency duty chart for all ofif-duty 
members of the force other than those on sick report or on 
vacation. For the two days, they were required to perform 
patrol duty from 9 A.M. until dismissed. 

The New York Times of the day following the drill com- 
mented that "aside from the willingness and general know- 
how of the public" and that "pedestrian and vehicular traf- 
fic were unusually light," the major factor contributing to 
the success of the test was the fact that "the police were 
on an emergency basis and had more than 9,000 men on 
duty, 3,400 of them assigned to trafific." 



Air Wardens and Auxiliary Police 

Despite the greatly augmented Uniformed Force, when 
the alert sounded at 10:33 A.M. on November 28, the train- 
ing and efficiency of the Air Wardens and the Auxiliary 
Police were a prime factor in clearing the city's streets. It 
was the initial opportunity to put their skills to a practical 
application and they acquitted themselves superbly. And 
this was accomplished despite the fact that the locale of 
their operations was far removed from the customary area 
of their duties. The explanation for this is that the average 



warden or auxiliary policeman enrolled for duty in his resi- 
dent precinct. The early morning flrill found most civil 
defense workers at their places of employment. Nonetheless, 
they donned their armbands and set about their tasks in a 
most business-like manner in the area in which they hap- 
pened to be. 

The general public was greatly impressed by their effi- 
ciency and courtesy. No better barometer of the degree of 
cooperation which they elicited from the city's residents 
could be found than that only one arrest had to be made 
for non-cooperation and that occurred inside a building and 
not on the street. The reports of the one hundred official 
observers indicated that the streets were cleared in most 
cases in about a minute and a half to two minutes. In the 
garment area, the large concentration of vehicles and the 
necessity of keeping the streets open required an additional 
minute to get everyone into shelters. 

It is estimated that 15,000 of the city's 20,000 Auxiliary 
Police and half of the 60,000 Air Wardens participated in 
the public drill. 

Police Emergency Division 

The training of and planning for the volunteer members 
of the Police Emergency Di\Tsion is centered in the Police 
Department's Division of Civil Defense which operates out 
of the Criminal Courts Building at 100 Centre Street, Man- 
hattan. Acting captains are specifically assigned to super- 
vise such components as communications, training, and 
light duty rescue. In each patrol division of the department, 
a lieutenant is assigned as the Division Civil Defense Co- 
ordinator and in each patrol precinct, a sergeant performs 
the same duty in his area. These police officers guide civil- 

(Continued on next page) 



AIR WARDEN. Old dobbin is quieted after his driver left to take shelter. PRIMARY DEFENSE ROUTE (right) West Side Highway 

was cleared of all traffic to facilitate movement of Civil Defense vehicles. 




12- 




AUXILIARY POLICE. Vehicles are directed to park at the curb 
before the occupants take shelter. 




City of new York 

Omc« or TMt M*»o» 
NEW YORK 7. N. Y. 



5 LJeccrber 1551 



The Honorable 

George P, MonaghaD.CommlsBioner 

Police Department 

2^+0 Centre Street 

New Yortt 13, H.I. 

Dear CommlBalonor Hanaghan: 

The Buooess of the ClTll Defense drlUa oonluo- 
ted during the month of November «b3 due In a very largo 
measure to the splmdld cooperation and teajnworl! displayed 
by all City Departments and Agencies engaged In Civil Defense. 

I am Joined by Director Arthur Wallander In ex- 
tending to you and the members of your Department sincere 
thanJss for the excellence of the service rendered In connec- 
tion with those drills. The wholehearted response and the 
intelligent work performed by your Civil Defense personnel, 
both regular employees and volunteers. Is deserving of the 
highest praise. 

The people of the City of Hew Ttork can be Justly 
proud of the fine organization of which you and your associates 
are a part, with the assurance that the best possible program 
for their protection during a Civil Defense emergmcy will be 
available to them. 

Sincerely youre. 




ian leaders of the Air Warden Service and the Auxiliary 
Police in fashioning a well-trained body of civic-minded 
protectors. 

The basic course of instruction for the Air Wardens and 
the Auxiliary Police is identical in some respects. Lectures 
are devoted to the Civil Defense Organization and just 
how the recruits' services fit into the pattern of survival. 
Essential information on the eiTects of atom bombs, on first 
aid, and on panic prevention and control is presented. Sub- 
sequent training deals with the more specific duties assigned 
to the Air Warden and Auxiliary Police. The latter, for 
example, are instructed in the provisions of the Penal Law 
and the city ordinances. The powers and responsibilities 
of peace officers in making arrests are stressed. Traffic 
control is also covered. 

While the Red Alert was sounding on November 28, the 
respective members of the Police Emergency Division went 
into action. The Air Wardens cooperated with the Uni- 
formed Force in directing persons to public shelters. It 
was a common sight to see wardens approach a bus as it 
pulled to a curb and direct the alighting passengers to the 
nearest shelter. In many cases, the wardens had the bus 
drivers pull up to a nearby subway entrance so that the 
passengers could go directly underground. 

Even the determination of what was to be the role of 
the bus passengers in the air raid drill required much 
thought and deliberation. A special subcommittee was ap- 
pointed to formulate plans for the regulation of buses dur- 
ing the drill. A high ranking officer of the Police Depart- 
ment was designated as chairman of this committee. Many 



eventualities were considered but finally it was decided 
that the buses had to be evacuated. In order to prevent con- 
fusion at the termination of the drill, as each passenger 
left the bus, he received a special slip containing air raid 
drill instructions and identifying the holder as a passenger 
entitled to resume travel on the bus. 

Subway travel under ground was not afifected but of the 
429 trains in service at the time of the alert, 139 were in 
the open on elevated structures. These latter trains pulled 
into the nearest station and all doors or gates were opened 
for the duration of the drill. Seven subway trains which 
had just emerged from underground into the open at such 
points as the IRT does near the Yankee Stadium, backed 
up again until they were underground. 

Meanwhile the members of the Auxiliary Police were 
assisting the Uniformed Force in bringing vehicular traffic 
to a halt and in the more important task of clearing the 
Primary Civil Defense Routes. These are highways upon 
which special traffic regulations will be imposed in the event 
of a disaster. Those portions necessary to insure the free 
movement of essential Civil Defense traffic will be strictly 
controlled. 

Primary and Secondary Routes 

For the past eight months, the Traffic Division and the 
Chief Engineer's Office of the Police Department have col- 
laborated on the mapping of both primary and secondary 
routes. The latter are alternate and connecting highways 
on which special traffic control measures will be imposed, 

(Confinved on page 28) 



— 13 — 



iTht 



Legal 
Bureau: 




LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

Confessions— When Deemed Inadmissible 

This material was prepared by Lieutenant 
John A. Ronayne of the Legal Bureau. 



IN a recent case the Court of Appeals 
of the State of New York unani- 
inously reversed a judi^einent of a con- 
viction of murder in the first degree by 
the lower courts. The case received 
wide attention in the newspapers, both 
at the time of the commission of the 
crime and at the trial and is deserving 
of interest by members of the Police 
Force for the principles of law stated 
in the court's opinion, especially in re- 
gard to the admissibility of confes- 
sions. 

The principal holding of this case is 
that torture of the mind is just as con- 
trary to inherent fairness and basic 
justice as torture of the body. A con- 
fession by which a person forfeits his 
life must be grounded on a reasoned 
and voluntary choice. This holding as 
to mental coercion is entirely new in 
New York law and very much of in- 
terest to the legal profession. It may 
be anticipated that this new principle 
of law will be relied upon in future 
attempts to invalidate confessions. Ob- 
viously the police must be aware of 
this and be extremely scrupulous to 
protect the rights of accused persons 
both as a matter of professional duty 
and to avoid reversal of convictions 
because of confessions attacked as ob- 
tained by coercion. 

Camilo Leyra Case 

The case was that of the People of 
the State of New York v. Camilo 
Leyra reported in 302 N.Y. 353. The 
facts of the case, as stated in the 
court's opinion, were as follows : 

On the afternoon of Tuesday, Janu- 
ary 10, 1950, Camilo Leyra, Sr., sev- 
enty-five years old, and Catherine, his 
wife, eighty years old, were found 
dead in their rear apartment on the 
first floor of premises 105 Quincy 
Street, Brooklyn. Death in each case 
resulted from a fractured skull, caused 
by several blows from a hammer. 
Their son, Camilo Leyra, Jr., fiftv 
years old, was the defendant in this 
action. He was convicted of the mur- 
der of both parents, in Kings County 
Court, before Judge Samuel Leibowitz. 
The verdict rested largely upon the 
confessions of the defendant made to 
various persons. 

The double homicide was discovered 



when tlie tlie defendant accompanied 
by Herrschaft, a partner and Valdes, 
a cousin called at the parents' home at 
about 3.30 P.M., to inquire why the 
father had not appeared at the office. 
The defendant seemed visibly shocked 
by the discovery, and later stated that 
he had been fearful for his parents' 
safety due to the deterioration of the 
neighborhood, and because they had 
some trouble with people in the vicinity. 
Although suspicion was not at first 
directed toward the defendant, it was 
not long before the attention of the 
police focused upon him. He was sub- 
jected to routine questioning on the 
evenins: of the homicides and on the 
following day, Wednesday ; and while 
a written statement was taken from 
him, it contained no admissions and he 
was not detained. He denied all know- 
ledge with respect to the crimes and 
tended to establish an alibi. He told 
the police of his movements on the day 
of their commission, which included a 
visit to his wife in New Jersey in the 
morning, and attendance at his office 
in the afternoon. 

Because of a statement made to the 
police by another witness with respect 
to a change of clothing by the de- 
fendant, the police inquiry continued, 
and Leyra was taxed with discrep- 
encies in his alibi. After accompanying 
detectives to various places in Manhat- 
tan to check his statements, he re- 
mained in custody of the police for all 
practical purposes until he was ar- 
raigned on Saturday morning, two 
(lays later. There was no evidence that 
the police offered him any violence 
during that time, but he was subjected 
to questioning by detectives of the 
Homicide Squad who questioned him 
intermittently from two o'clock Thurs- 
day afternoon, throughout the night, 
and until about nine o'clock Friday 
morning. In relation to later events, 
it may be noted that defendant had no 
sleep whatever that night. 

During this questioning, the de- 
fendant made a number of very dam- 
aging admissions, contrary to his pre- 
vious statements, to the efTect that he 
thought he must have been at his 
parents' home on the preceeding Tues- 
day morning at or about the time of 
the commission of the homicides. He 



told of arguments with his father over 
the preceding weekend and finally 
said: "I must have been there; I re- 
member; definitely I was there." He 
then described how he met his mother 
at the door, giving all the details of 
that episode, but did not admit the 
homicides. 

Introduction <if Private Doctor 

Not content with the admissions al- 
ready made by the defendant, he was 
introduced to a doctor at about 7.00 
P.M. on Friday evening. This doctor, 
who was not connected with the Police 
Department or with the prosecutor's 
office had been called to the police sta- 
tion by the District Attorney, who out- 
lined the case to him. The physician 
was a specialist in neurology and 
psychiatry, and used the technique of 
psychoanalysis in his practice. He 
agreed to talk to defendant upon condi- 
tion that there would be no one else 
in the room. He knew, however, that 
the room was wired and that the inter- 
view would be electrically recorded by 
a recording machine. The police and 
the District Attorney were in the base- 
ment of the police station, where they 
overheard the entire interview. 

The doctor spent an hour and a half 
with defendant. A transcript of the 
recorded interview shows that he told 
defendant at the outset : "I'll tell you 
what the purpose of my talk to you is. 
I want to see if I can help you." The 
doctor asked him about his sinus con- 
dition and in the course of the inter- 
view said : "I'm your doctor." The 
transcript discloses that on at least 
forty occasions the doctor in one way 
or another promised to help defendant, 
and on one occasion said : "I know you 
are in a little trouble. We do, some- 
times, things that are not right, but in 
a fit of temper or anger we sometimes 
do things that we aren't really respon- 
sible for. I want to see whether or not 
you did something but which you've 
done in a fit of temper or anger." 
Leyra told the doctor he was "very 
tired, I had two hours sleep. Just now 
they woke me up. That's since Tues- 
day." 

Further Statements 

Further statements of the defendant 
were interrupted by noise which was 
said to be due to the electrical record- 
ing system. No one could tell from 
the record what else the defendant said 
here. This happened numerous times 
throughout the recording. 

The recording showed that the doctor 
said : "I am going to put my hand on 
your forehead and as I put my hand 



— 14- 



on your forehead, you are going to 
bring back all these thoughts that are 
coming to your mind. I am going to 
keep my hand on your forehead and 
I am going to ask you questions and 
now you will be able to tell me." This 
technique — of promising help and sug- 
gestions to the defendant as to what 
to say — run all through the transcript 
of the recording. 

In any event, the doctor continued 
with this significant statement : "These 
people are going to throw the book at 
you unless you can show that in a fit 
of temper you got so angry that you 
did it. Otherwise they toss premedita- 
tion in and it's premeditation. See?" 
The import of this language had a 
strong influence on the court. 

The defendant asked to speak to 
Captain Meenahan of the police Homi- 
cide Squad, and made a full and de- 
tailed confession to both homicides, in 
the course of which he stated he lost 
his temper and was overcome by a fit 
of anger and rage. Following his con- 
fession to Captain Meenahan, he told 
his partner, Herrschaft, who had been 
directed by a detective to be present, 
that he "did it." Thereafter and during 
the same evening, defendant again 
confessed these crimes to two assistant 
district attorneys, who took the written 
statement from him which was offered 
in evidence at the trial. 

Oaim of H^-pnotism 

At the trial Leyra claimed that he 

was hypnotized by the doctor; that all 
of the confessions of Friday evening 
were made under that hypnotic influ- 
ence and that they were involuntarj- 
and untrue. He denied that he killed 
his parents and asserted that he did 
not known what happened within a 
few minutes of the time he started 
talking to the doctor and the following 
Sunday morning. 

Since the issue of hyponotism was 
a question of fact which was con- 
cerned largely with the credibility of 
the defendant as against that of the 
doctor, and since the issue was fully 
and impartially presented to the jury, 
which found against the defendant, the 
Court of Appeals did not interfere 
with this particular finding. However, 
the Court of Appeals held that it did 
not necessarily follow because the jurj' 
decided adversely to the defendant on 
this one issue, that the confessions ob- 
tained Friday evening were voluntary 
within the meaning of Section 395 of 
the Code of Criminal Procedure or that 
there was no violation of the require- 
ments of due process. 



Court Opinion 

Judge Charles W. Froessel, writing 
the opinion of the court, stated that the 
admissions in the defendant's state- 
ment to the doctor were improperly 
admitted and should not have been sub- 
mitted to the jury. The trial court 
should have so determined as a matter 
of law, since it is the duty of the court 
to reject a confession if a verdict that 
it was freely made would have been 
against the weight of the evidence. 
(People v. Doran, 246 N. Y. 409; 
People V. Valletutti, 297 N. Y. 226). 

Bearing in mind the setting in 
which this interview was arranged and 
recorded, while defendant was in cus- 
tody of the police; defendant's physi- 
cal and mental condition at the time; 
the psychiatrist, calling himself de- 
fendant's doctor, playing upon the 
latter's natural fears and hopes ; press- 
ing his hands upon defendant's head 
with accompanying commands, suggest- 
ing details to an unwilling mind by 
persistent and unceasing questioning; 
and all the attendant circumstances 
taken together, the court held that this 
interview was a subtle intrusion upon 
the rights of the accused and was 
tantamount to a form of mental 
coercion. No such intrusion may be 
sanctioned in a system of law which is 
based upon the presumption of in- 
nocence, surrounded by the constitu- 
tional safeguards afforded to every in- 
dividual. The doctor here did not tell 
defendant that he had been called 
into the case by the District At- 
torney; that the latter and the police 
were listening to their conversation ; 
that defendant could have his own 
doctor or lawyer or anyone else. 

The court stated that some of these 
circumstances standing alone, such as 
defendant being in police custody at 
the time of the confession (People v. 
Murphy, 63 N. Y. 590; People v. 
Perez, 300, N. Y. 208) or mere failure 
to warn defendant that he was under 
no obligation to speak or that anything 
he might sav could be used against him, 
(People V. Randazzio, 194 N. Y. 147) 
would not invalidate a confession. 

While deception alone, or a mere 
\aolation of confidence by a doctor in 
the sense that he voluntarily disclosed 
to the police a confidential communica- 
tion received in the usual practice of 
his profession may not render a con- 
fession invalid (see People v. Wentz, 
37 N. Y. 303 ; People v. Buffom, 214 
N. Y. 53), the Court of Appeals re- 
fused to assent to the doctrine that 
representatives of the State may thus 
employ a relationship, which is of a 
character that our public policy holds 
privileged in order to obtain a confes- 



sion out of the defendant's own mouth 
under these circumstances. If a physi- 
cian could be used in this manner, then 
a lawyer or clergj'man could also be 
used. The essential fairness of our 
form of justice would certainly be 
wanting if practices such as these were 
to be approved. 

The Court of Appeals has held in the 
past that an invohmtary confession is 
by its very nature evidence of nothing. 
(People V. Valletutti, 297 N. Y. 226). 
Moreover our Federal Constitution in 
the 14th Amendment is a bar to the 
conviction of any individual in our 
courts of justice by means of a coerced 
confession. We have a like provision 
in Section 6, Article I of our State 
Constitution. A denial of due process 
has been defined as the failure to ob- 
serve the fundamental fairness es- 
sential to the very concept of justice. 
Such unfairness exists when a coerced 
confession is used as a means of ob- 
taining a verdict of guilt. Not only is 
the use of a coerced confession in ob- 
taining a conviction a violation of due 
process, but, if such confession is ad- 
mitted in evidence, it is sufficient to 
void the conviction regardless of other 
evidence which might nevertheless 
demonstrate guilt (Malinski v. New 
York, 324 U. S. 401). 

Due process is not lacking where, 
upon facts permitting different con- 
clusions, it is left for the jury, upon 
proper submission, to say whether or 
not there was coercion. Whether the 
coercion which was found in de- 
fendant's statement to the doctor ex- 
tended over and into the later confes- 
sions to Captain Meenahan, Herrschaft 
and the assistant district attorneys re- 
mains a question of fact for determina- 
tion by the jury. The judgments of 
conviction were unanimously reversed 
and a new trial ordered. 

This case shows how careful the 
courts are to protect the rights of an 
accused person no matter how shock- 
ing the crimes with which he is 
charged. It is apparent that the police 
must be just as careful to protect these 
same constitutional rights. Although 
we cannot prevent accusations of 
coercion and unlawful use of force, we 
can refute these accusations in court, 
by showing that defendants were han- 
dled with strict regard for their right! 
and that all questioning was conducted 
in a fair and open manner before com- 
petent witnesses who can attest to the 
fair treatment received. Where the 
District Attorney's office is concerned 
in an investigation, the members of the 
force should be guided by the direc- 
tions of the assistant assigned to the 
case. 



— 15 — 




CHRISTMAS CHEER. December 21 was a big day for the families of 260 men of the department when promotions were made to 

that many of them. 

Christmas Promotions for 260 Men 

Mayor Discusses Salary Problem 



r^ HIRSTMAS arrived on December 21 lor two 
hundred and sixty members of the force who 
received promotions in rank that day. Originally 
scheduled for December 20, the ceremonies were 
postponed when some candidates on the newly re- 
leased liuentenant's list waived their veteran's pre- 
ference rights with resulting changes in their rela- 
tive positions. 

One hundred and one lieutenants were appointed making 
it the second largest group to be promoted in years. In the 
case of the one hundred and fourteen sergeants appointed, 
the total was second only to the group of one hundred and 
ninety-nine sergeanis, promoted simultaneously in 1927. In 
addition, one deputy chief inspector, one inspector, three 



deputy inspectors and three captains were also appointed. 
The Detective Division came in for its share with the ad- 
vancement in grade of thirty-seven men. 

The large audience heard Mayor Vincent R. Impellitteri 
and Commissioner George P. Monaghan congratulate the 
men on their promotions. 

Saying, "It makes me very happy to be able to make 
these promotions on the eve of Christmas because I know 
what it means to the men and their families," the Com- 
missioner went on to discuss the new problems that each 
group of appointees would face. 

The Commissioner said to the new captains, "It is im- 
possible to overemphasize the importance of your job. In 
essence, every captain is the chief of police for his com- 
munity. The manpower in certain precincts is greater than 
that of the police forces of many cities in the United States. 



— 16^ 



The power and responsibility of each captain is tremendous. 
Be honest to your job, to your oath of office and nothing; but 
good can come of it." 

The Commissioner thanked the Mayor for having made 
the promotions possible. Mayor Impellitteri then addressed 
the audience stressing the problem of the city's "fixed 
income" and its negative elifect on the possibility of salary 
increases. 

Declaring that the city administration was at work on a 
legislative program to bring in additional revenue, the 
Mayor said that when this was accomplished he and the 
members of the Board of Estimate would be happy to sit 
down with all city employee groups and work out equitable 
adjustments of salaries. 

Pre-Christmas Promotions 

Preceding the mass Christmas promotions were the 
advancement to inspector of Deputy Inspectors James 
Nidds, Office of the Chief Inspector and John H. Mitchell, 
Police Commissioner's Office. Commissioner Monaghan 
made both of these appointments on November 19 at 
ceremonies in his office. 

On December 13, Deputy Inspector Walter H. Kuntz- 
man, 22nd Division, was promoted to his new rank from 
his command as captain of the newly opened 107th Prrcinct. 

Promotions of December 21 



DEP. CHIEF INSPECTOR 

James B. Leggctt, Det. Div. 

INSPECTOR 

Tames P. Dermodv, Boro. Hq., 
Man. W. 

DEPUTY INSPECTORS 

Stephen L. Sheedv, Boro. Hq. 

Bnx. 

Edward Feeley, Det. Div. 

Edward F. Stanley, 16th Div. 



CAPTAINS 



Elwood L. 

Harold A. 

Man. E. 

Weaker G. 



Metz, nth Div. 
Rhodes, Boro. Hq. 

Hegart>-, 5th Div. 



LIEUTENANTS 

WilHam T. Burrell, P.C.O. 
Frank X. Znllo, P.C.O. 
.Andrew C. Leddy, Oflt. of 4th 

D.P.C. 
Elmer C. Cone, O.C.I. 
Robert J. Mangum, J.A.B. 
Eugene Ahem, Mtd. Sqd. No. 1 
Edgar J. Perrv. Mtd. Sqd. 

No. 1 
Toseph W. Tung, M.S.B. 
William P. McCarthy, M.S.B. 
Edmund G. Makowski. M.S.B. 
Sam W. Ivleinfeld, M.S.B. 



William T. McCullough, M.S.B. 
Carl A. Jordan, Det. Bur. 

Boro. Hq. Man. E. 
.Arthur F. Giddings, Det. Bur. 

Boro. Hq. Bklyn. W. 
John P. McCarthy, Cent. Off. 

Burs, and Sqds. 
lohn H. Thompson, 7th D.D. 
"Thomas P. Reid, 20th D.D. 
Francis P. Crotty, 19th Pet. 
Frederick W. Mohrmann, Har. 

Pet. 
Robert E. Tuffy, Har. Pet. 
Pearse P. Meagher, 10th Div. 
.Anthony Ragonetti, 20th Div. 
Seymour Pine, 21st Div. 
William G. Rock-well, 23rd Div. 
Eugene F. Leonard, 4th Pet. 
Vincent N. Nardiello, 62nd Pet. 
William T. O'Rourke, 19th Pet. 
David W. Sackman, 5th Pet. 
Ralph W. Dudley, 26th Pet. 
George P. McManus, 24th Pet. 
Thomas E. O'Brien. 6th Pet. 
Matthew T. McEntee, 34th Pet. 
Harrv Heller, 81st Pet. 
Edward J. Drum, 20th Pet. 
James J. Corridan, 26th Pet. 
Leo Safron. 77th Pet. 
\'incent T. Mansfield. 1st Pet. 
William E. Connor. 101st Pet. 
Robert T. O'Donnell, 9th Pet. 
Tohn J. Sadlier, 23rd Pet. 
Robert J. Cornwall. 82nd Pet. 
Harold S. Keller, 78th Pet. 
John J. Dunn, 42nd Pet. 
Charles Smyth. 15th Pet. 
M\ron Housman, 3rd Pet. 
John J. Higgins, 48th Pet. 
Michael Tauber, Jr., 22nd Pet. 




THE "TOP MAN" of the day was D.C.I. James B. Leggett pictured 

here as he receives congratulations from Mayor Impellitteri and 

Commissioner Monaghan following his promotion. 




FOLLOWING THEIR PROMOTIONS to the rank of Inspector on 

November 19, Inspectors James Nidds and John H. Mitchell 

posed happily as did newly appointed Inspector James P. 

Dermody, (right) on December 21. 




(Continued on next page) 



FOUR NEW DEPUTY INSPECTORS, Walter H. Kuntzman, (left), 

promoted December 13) Stephen L. Sheedy, Edward Feeley 

and Edward F. Stanley, (all promoted December 21) have 

already assumed their new posts. 



— 17 — 



PROMOTIONS fConfn,„ 



<dl 



LIEUTENANTS 

(Contnivd) 

James C. Aiisliii. i8lli l\-|. 
Robert n. M.irsh, 22\u\ Pet. 
Arthur X. Pruppcr. 7tli Pet. 
Morris H. Slu-r. 4ntli IV-i. 
Bciijaniiii 1 lillinaii, 2,!rii Pel. 
Patrick B. Cliiic, 84ili IVl. 
.•\rtluir I. SohiriiKT, ')4lli Pet. 
Saimicl Pauilol, lltli Pel. 
lulwanl W. I'sc.ia, 52ii<l Pet. 
John F. MeLoii.yliliii. 50tli I'ei. 
Ktlwarcl F. (iaiiiuiii, I^lli Pel. 
.-\aroii Medclsky, 52iul Pet. 
X'aleiiline PfalTiiiaini, |r. .SO;li 

Pet. 
Jack Levy. 64lli Pet. 
Guido P. Moliiin, SOtli Pel. 
Lcif C. Rcincrlscii, /ftili I'ei. 
Harold T. \'eiiokiir. 8Isl Pel. 
Robert A. Roetia, 67lh I'ei 
William .A. Bradley. 681I1 Pet 
Charles J. Fahrc. 77lh Pel. 
Itiliiis Grob';cld, 66lh Pet. 
r^iymond J. McrVniioit. 8.? Pel. 
Frank A. Rice, 71st Pet. 
Dennis E. Carcv, 66tli Pel. 
Albert Jacobs, 74lh Pet. 
Arthur H. Saviit, 67lh Pel. 
John H. Kaniii. S.^ih Pet. 
Charles M, Stuve, S.^rd Pet. 
Kenneth T. Jones, 79th Pet. 
Johannes F. Spreen, 79th Pet. 
Henry C.iitteniilan, 71st Pet. 
Carl Raven*, 72nd Pet. 
Frederick D. Kranz. 61st Pet. 
Casimir Kruszewski, 78th Pet. 
Tohn J. Henrv. 94th Pet. 
Howard J. Gardner. 75th Pet. 
Tack Goloshin, 69th Pet. 
John H. Canavan, 78th Pet. 
Tames W. Herlihv. 6th Pet. 
Michael DeSario, 85th Pet. 
Thomas F. Kelleher. 7Sth Pet. 
Thomas P. Kellv. 79th Pet. 
Robert H. \V. Reimer. 105 Pet 
Walter E. Weber, 120th Pet. 
lohn H. Levender, 76th Pet 
Eli Lazarus, 73rd Pet. 
Charles S. Crowley, 44th Pet. 
John Grimes, Traf, R. 
William H. LaTonr, Traf. K 
Samuel Wallach, 60th Pet. 
Francis C. Murphy, 3rd Pet. 
Charles R. Klein, Mev Pet 

Xo. 2 
Ely Levine, Mcy. Pet. No. 2 
Edward A. Geis, Mcy. Pet. 
N'o. 1 



SERGEANTS 

W m. J. Zimmerman, 1 lar. Pet. 
Norman P. Rcid, 7th Pet. 
Maurice V. Barry, 12th D.D. 
Ellsworth A. Monahan, Cent 

Off. Burs, and Sqds. 
John J. Donovan. J.A.B. 
Edward J. Lorch, lOth Div. 
Frank D. Rice, 104th Pet. 
George J. Karlon, 30th Pet. 
John J. Walsh, Traf. I. 
John T. O'Grarly, 14th Pet. 
Henry R. Benavirles, 103rd Pet 
Robert N. Schaffer, 88th Pet. 
Henry J. Greser, 123rd Pet. 
James T. Lane, 18th Pet. 
Frank E. Weldon, 30th Pel 
-Abraham Dcrman, 105th I'ei. 
Jo.scph G. Calhoun, 106th Pel. 



Captains Sworn In 




THREE NEWLY PROMOTED CAPTAINS, Harold A. Rhodes, 
Walter G. Hegarty and Elwood L. Metz. 



Watkin T. Parry, 71st Pet. 
John F. Bracken, 122nd Pet. 
John S. Robb. ISth Pet. 
Carl Goodsmith, 9th Pet. 
Charles E. Schuller, 10th Pet. 
Joseph .A, McDonald, 28th Pet. 
Edward H. Heitmann, 17th Pet 
V\'ilfred T. Kent, 25th Pet. 
Samuel Siegel, 18th Pet. 
Sigmund West, 63rd Pet. 



Dennis J. Hill, 4th Pet. 
John M. Conlon, 26th Pet. 
Michael J. Ward, Jr., 28th Pet. 
William P. Carr, 52nd Pet 
Charles Zraly, 40th Pet. 
Philip M. Hogan, 7th Pet. 
David M, Weis, 60th Pet. 
Joseph A. Zito, 8th Pet. 
Raymond T. Dooley, 11th Pet. 
Donald E. Wiseman, 100th Pet. 



FOR ALL MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT: 

Each month, SPRING 3100 publishes an original short 
story written by some member of the department. We 
also try to include within our pages as many original 
cartoons as space will allow. 

To encourage this literary and artistic eflFort within the 
department, the editor awards a monthly prize of $25.00 
for each short story that is published and a prize of $5.00 
for each cartoon used. 

Short Sfory— Stories should be typewritten, double 
spaced using one side of the page. Any subject may be 
submitted but those concerning policmen and their activ- 
ities have a greater appeal to our readership. Stories 
should be between 1,000 words and 1,500 words in 
length. 

Cartoons— For best reproduction, drawings should be 
done in black drawing ink on white cardboard, eight 
inches square. 

All manuscripts and drawings should be addressed to 
the Editor, SRING 3100 at 400 Broome Street, Manhattan. 



Edward R. Kast, 1st Pet. 
Kenneth W. O'Xeil, 3rd Pet. 
Thomas G. Dwycr, 17th Pet. 
Lawrence ]. Lueev, 108th Pet. 
\\aller F. Phclan", Traf. D. 
Thomas F. Caffrcy. 81st Pet. 
Sigvald ,'\. .Jindcrson, 76th Pet. 
loseph J. Sevmour, 67th Pel. 
lohn I. O'Connell, E.S.D. 
l-rcderiek L Selzlc. E.S.D. 
Thomas C. P. TilTany, E.S.D. 
W illiani F. Connors, E.S.D. 
lolin R. Lancaster. 15th Pet. 
Lloy<l Scaly, 77lh Pet. 
T'rank J. Ghcrieieh, llOlh Pet. 
Paul A. Pullells. Mev. Pet. 

Xo. 2 
John M. Rapi)S, Me\. Pet. Xo. 2 
Howard W. Bcnnet. Ml. I. Sqd. 

Xo, 1 
l-"raneis I. Ford, .Mtd S(|d. 

.\o. 1 
lames E. Turner, 123nl Pel. 
I'icorge Blumenthal, 23rd Pel. 
lames J. Collin.s, 42nd Pet. 
Francis V. Boberek, 122nd Pet. 
Robert Ditmars, 34lh Pet. 
-Marliii F. Flvnn, 6th Pet. 
John E. Withani, 13th Pet. 
Mrjrris Bcrkowitz, 87th Pet. 
Daniel G. Byrne, 18th Pet. 
Francis L. Murphy, 24lh Pel. 
John R. Keeshan, 92nd Pet. 
Patrick J. McMahon, 20th Pet. 
Joseph P. Sherman, 25th Pet. 
Georsre L. Reichlc. 13th Pet. 
William D. Kelly. 17th Pet. 
John T. Croake, 25th Pet. 
Richard J. Jiranck, 23rd Pet. 
Daniel Sullivan. 40th Pet. 
Roger E. Donegan, 34th Pet. 
Raphael Del Monte. 114th Pet. 
.\nthony LeBarbera, 28th Pet. 
Richard L Corcoran, 46th Pet. 
Michael DufFv. 40th Pet. 
Frederick H. T.aylor, 32nd Pet. 
Samuel .Alpert, 11th Pet. 
Jack A. Mark, 34th Pet. 
Adam F. T. D'Allessandro, 44th 

Pet. 
Charles E. Elliott, 17th Pet. 
Daniel F. O'Sullivan. 26th Pel. 
Don.ild Rimslein, 48th Pet. 
William F. Gates, 60th Pet. 
Herman .Shaw, 76th Pet. 
Edward E. Bernstein, 66th Pet. 
Hvnian Lipson, 60th Pet. 
Harold J. Derp, 74th Pet. 
Charles A. Ferrin, 102nd Pet. 
Conrad J. Yandola, 71st Pet. 
Israel Janowitz, 69th Pet. 
Peter Priolo, 68th Pet. 
Jacob Wies, 82nd Pet. 
John M. Lynch, 74th Pet. 
Henry G. Schmilt, 109th Pet. 
George Simon, 76th Pet. 
.Abraham T. Katz, 9ih Pet. 
John K. Baynon. 103rd Pet. 
John R. Con.si.gli, 72nd Pet. 
Joseph M. Bruton, Jr., 79th Pet. 
.Andrew J. Meekin. 73rd Pel. 
Richard H. Gillespie, 11th Pet. 
Geor.tre Klecak, 3rd Pet. 
William H. Veil, 100th Pet. 
Russell Lawrence, 88th Pet. 
W illiam C. Brennan, 88th Pet. 
Patrick F. O'Leary 
Thomas T. Gorhan, 123rd Pel. 
Alfred R. Giinz, Traf. E. 
lames V. Grove Traf. G. 
Thomas M. Brogan, Traf. P. 



18 



TOP COMMAND 



SKETCHES OF TOP-RANKING MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 




AT one time the youngest policeman on the force, ap- 
pointed three months after his twenty-first birthday, 
Inspector Joseph J. D'Azevedo commands the 7th Division 
in Manhattan, but is presently occupying the post of Chief 
I of Staff in the absence of Assistant 
I Chief Inspector James McElroy, on 
sick report. . . . Born in College 
I'dint, he was educated by the Chris- 
tian Brothers and later attended 
W'liod Business School in Manhat- 
tan. . . . His father, Joseph J. D'Aze- 
\ Clio, was a lieutenant in the Fire De- 
partment and was the founder and 
president of the Fire Department 
Band. ... A secretary in the execu- 
Joseph J. D'Azevedo (i^,^^ ^^ff^^^ Qf g Altman and Com- 
pany before entering the department, he married Miss 
Jeannie A. Stewart in 1927 a year after becoming a blue- 
coat. . . . With his wife and daughter, Jeanne Margaret 19, 
a secretary, he lives in Flushing, Queens. . . . He has been 
in the patrol and traffic branches and performed administra- 
tive duties in the Chief Inspector's Office and the Air 
Warden Service. . . . He served for several years in the 
Bureau of Orders. . . . Also assisted in the organization of 
the original Bureau of Public Relations and the Bureau of 
Planning and Operations. ... In 1949 he supervised the 
preparation of a Transit Police survey. ... In his spare 
time he enjoys tinkering with mechanical gadgets. . . . Prior 
to his marriage, he resided in the 131st Street and Amster- 
dam Avenue section of Manhattan, an area that produced 
many present day members of the force. 



A veteran of police ser\ice in all sections of the city, In- 
spector James P. McDonnell now commands the 12th 
Division in the East Bronx. ... A member of the depart- 
ment for twenty-nine years, he was born in Danbury, Con- 
necticut and came as an infant to 
New York, where his family settled 
on the East Side. ... He attended St. 
.\nn's Academy on East 77th Street 
and St. Michael's Parochial School 
before entering De Witt Clinton 
High. Since completing his formal 
schooling, he has continued his edu- 
cation by taking courses at local insti- 
tutions of higher learning when the 
courses could be fitted into his time 
Jomes p. McDonnell schedule. He is presently enrolled at 
NYU. . . . His father was a civil engineer. . . . Before 
joining the force, Inspector McDonnell was engaged as a 
physical director by the New York City Bureau of Recrea- 
tion and he coached a wide variety of teams. He still 
maintains a lively interest in athletics and is now on the 
Wrestling Committee of the AAU. Designated as an AAU 
wrestling official, he acts as program director for meets 
sponsored by the AAU. ... A many-times cited veteran of 
the patrol and detective branches, he is a down-to-earth 
practical policeman — a cop's cop — who believes all police 
officers should master the ability of shooting with either 
hand. . . . He lives in the Chelsea section of Manhattan. 
. . . He is First Vice President of the Honor Legion. 




PRESENTLY commanding Brooklyn's 15th Division, In- 
spector Thomas F. Connolly is a veteran of twenty-four 
years police service. Experience that included patrol. Emer- 
gency Service, Air Warden Service and the Police Aca- 
demy serves him well in his present 
post covering the extensive Bath 
Beach, Sheepshead Bay and Bay 
Ridge sections. ... A native of 
Dover, Massachusetts, he was taken 
to Ireland as a child by his parents. 
Completing grammar school there, 
he returned to America where the 
familv settled in Dorchester, Massa- 
chusetts. He received his high school 
education there and came to New 
Thomas F. Connolly York City at the age of eighteen. . . . 
He worked as a shipping clerk for the Standard Oil Com- 
pany before entering the department in 1928. . . . He was 
married in 1931. \\'ith his wife. Catharine, and their five 
children he lives in Rego Park, Queens. A daughter, Bar- 
bara 18, attending St. John's University, is the oldest 
child. Thomas 15, goes to St. John's Prep, while Robert 11, 
Linda 9. and Diane 7, all attend Ascension Parochial School. 
.\ sports fan, he likes hunting, fishing and golf as partici- 
pation sports, while he roots for the Dodgers and the New 
'S'ork Rangers. . . . He is a member of the Queensboro 
Lodge of tiie Elks and the PBA. 




INSPECTOR James J. Fox, whose father was a New York 
Police sergeant before him, now holds the command of 
the 23rd Division in Queens. . . . Service in the patrol, 
motorcycle, detective and plainclothes branches provided 
him with a comprehensive police ex- 
perience over his twenty-nine years 
in the department. ... As a superior 
officer, he was also detailed to the 
Police Equipment Bureau. . . . Born 
on lower Manhattan's East 9th Street, 
he moved with his family to York- 
\ille when he was six. He attended 
St. Monica's Parochial School and, 
later, Fordham. . . . Enlisting in the 
army the day World War I was de- 
Jomes J. Fox clared, he served in France with the 

22nd Engineers of the 27th Infantry Division. . . . Em- 
jiloyed previously as a credit manager, he joined the force 
in 1922, ... He and his wife. Rose, married in 1930. make 
their home in Highbridge. Four girls and a boy make up 
the rest of the fainily. Eileen 20, is employed as a secretary : 
Roseinary 18, is a sophomore at Hunter College ; Carol 
Ann 14, is in her second year at Sacred Heart of Mary 
Academy; Alice Jane 10. and James 8. attend Sacred Heart 
Parochial School. . . . For exercise, the inspector likes 
swiinming. His favorite pastime is reading English litera- 
ture, with special emphasis on Dickens and Shakespeare. 




19 




m % Ike half J tlfcfk 



A FTER forminij thirty men, woiir'h 
■^*- and children into a human chain 
and leading them down a fire escape to 
safety from a blazini; tenement. Patrol- 
man Arthur Szablewicz, 79th Precinct, 
returned to the third floor to rescue 
three youngsters who were trapped in 
their bedroom. 

Unable to reach doorbells in the 
hallway due to intense smoke and heat 
at 7:30 A.M.. November 26. Patrol- 
man .^zablewicz climbed a fire escape 
and smashed windows to rouse the 
sleeping tenants. After successfully 
leading them to the ground, he learned 
that three boys ages 10, 8 and 4 years, 
were unaccounted for. Scurrying back 
up the fire escape, Patrolman Szable- 
wicz found the boys huddled in a 
smoke filled bedroom unable to make 
their way out. .Szablewicz picked up 
the youngest child and carried him 
out the window while the two older 
boys tagged along clutching the of- 
ficer's coat. The three boys were re- 
moved to Kings County Hospital for 
treatment for smoke poi.soning. 

When he returned to the station 
house Patrolman Szablewicz also was 
stricken. He was found to be suffering 
from smoke poisoning ami, after treat- 
ment, had to report sick. 



A MISSING shoe was the clue used 
"^*- by Patrolmen Frank Brinker 
and Harvey Jacobson, 103rd Precinct, 
on December 3, to definitely link a 
burglary suspect with his crime. 

At 3 :30 A.M., the patrolmen were 
dispatched to a call that a burglar had 
been surprised in an apartment and, 
although the occupant had grappled 
with him, had escaped. 

Investigation at the apartment pro- 
duced a shoe which did not belong 
to any of the occupants. With the 
shoe in their possession, the patrol- 
men made a thorough search of the 
imrnediate vicinity and then began to 
cruise the neighborhood. About an 



Patrolman Rescues Thirty-three Persons 




THREE-YEAR OLD JOHNNY SZABELWICZ is all attentive, as his father, 
Szablewicz, relates his experiences of rescuing thirty-three persons from 

tenement. 



Patrolman 
a burning 



hour later the officers spied a man in 
stockinged feet dart into an alley. 
When they caught him, the shoe was' 
a perfect fit. A search of the alley 
turned up the second shoe which the 
burglar discarded when he saw the 
police. 

At the 103rd Precinct station house. 
Patrolmen Brinker and Jacobson 
charged their prisoner with burglary 
and assault. 



A DKSERTED tenement was turned 
"^^ into a corral for a gang of house 
wreckers last October 30, bv Patrol- 



men James T. Brown and Mark Cal- 
lahan. 28th Precinct, when the offi- 
cers* trapj)ed the gang in the act of 
hauling away plumbing fixtures, 
pipes, radiators and electrical equip- 
ment from the condemned building. 

A series of complaints had been re- 
ceived that a group of marauders 
were stripping condemned buildings 
in the 28th and 32nd Precincts. Yiith 
this alert in mind, Patrolmen Brown 
and Calhihan were prepared when the 
radio dis|)al«her .-ent iIkmu to investi- 
gate a report of suspicious men in a 
recently vacated building on \^ est 
123rd Street. 



•20 — 



The patrolmen surprised a gang of 
thirteen Brooklyn, Bronx and Man- 
hattan men who had converged on 
the building with two trucks. 

The house wreckers were well or- 
ganized as was indicated by their pre- 
cision-like operations. The building 
in which they were found had been 
vacated by its last occupant at 5 P.M. 
An hour and a half later, the gang 
was hard at work. 

The thirteen men were booked at 
the 32nd Precinct for unlawful entry. 



TV /[■ INUTES after snatching a wo- 
-^' -*■ man's purse on' Greene Avenue, 
a suspect was shot and wounded when 
he broke away while being questioned 
by Patrolmen John Slevin and John 
Viking on R.M.P. duty. 

As the officers were cruising along 
Greene Avenue, a badly frightened 
woman hailed them and reported the 
larceny. On the possibility that the 
thief might still be in the immediate 
vicinity, the officers took the victim 
on a tour of the neighborhood. At 
Waverly Avenue, the woman spotted 
the alleged thief. While Patrolman 
Slevin was questioning him, the suspect 
suddenly made a break. With Patrol- 
man Slevin on foot and Patrolman 
Viking in the R.M.P. car, the chase 
wound its way along Fulton Street to 
Clinton Avenue and thence along Clin- 
ton Avenue to Atlantic Avenue. As the 
fugitive neared the intersection. Patrol- 
man Slevin ordered him to halt but 
the order was ignored. Both officers 
then fired with Patrolman Slevin's bul- 
let finding its mark. A search of his 
pockets produced jewelry taken from 
the victim's purse. 

After removal to Kings County 
Hospital, the thief was booked for 
grand larcenv at the 88th Precinct. 



A CAR, speeding through a red 
light at 73rd Street and Third 
Avenue, started a three mile chase 
through Manhattan streets. Twenty- 
two department vehicles were alerted 
before Patrolmen Herbert Cantor and 
Vernon Hodges, 19th Precinct, finally 
caught up with the automobile and its 



three occupants on 45th Street between 
Third and Lexington Avenues. 

Patrolmen Cantor and Hodges were 
on patrol when they took up the chase 
and notified the Communications Bu- 
reau of the pursuit. Keeping CB 
notified, the patrolmen continued the 
chase and radio motor patrol cars and 
detectives along the route were notified 
to keep an eye peeled for the speeding 
car. Finally at 45th Street, when the 
officers caught up with the vehicle, its 
occupants sought to fight their way out 
of the trap and continue their flight 
on foot. However, Cantor and Hodges 
quickly subdued the trio and placed 
them under arrest. It was learned at the 
station house that one of them was an 
Army deserter who had pulled at least 
four stick-ups in the previous ten days. 
He also had stolen the car in which 
they were finally captured. 



A 



WAVE of pocketbook larcenies 
in St. Patrick's Cathedral was 



halted last November 24, when Detec- 
tive Mary Shanley, Confidence and 
Pickpocket Squad, nabbed a known 
female purse snatcher on the lookout 
for an easy victim. 

Following report of a series of 
thefts, Detective Shanley was assigned 
to watch for suspects frequenting the 
Cathedral. As she observed the wor- 
shippers, she noted a familiar per- 
sonality. The woman was arrested as 
a "known thief found in a public 
place with intent to comit a crime." 

Investigation Ijy Detective Shanley 
of the suspect's belongings revealed a 
lot of bankbooks, identification cards 
and other articles belonging to vic- 
tims of purse snatching in the past 
year. 

A PAIR of potential stick-up men 
-^*- had their careers cut short by two 
alert patrolmen, Alphonse Bisogno and 

(Continued on next page) 



LITTER BEARERS 




MEMBERS OF THE PATROL FORCE AND EMERGENCY SERVICE DIVISION give an 

excellent example of team work as they carry an injured woman on a litter from the 

New York Central Railroad wreck under Park Avenue last Thanksgiving Day. 



21 



ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK 

(Continued from page 21 



OLD ACQUAINTANCE 




PATROLMAN RICHARD CONDON, 46th Precinct, was disagreeably surprised lost 

November 21, when he arrested a former Army buddy as the holdup man of a Bronx 

bar and grill. PtI. Condon is shown standing between the victim and the perpetrator 

(seated) after identification at the station house. 



Vincent Gaetano, 83rd Precinct, last 
October 26, following an attempted 
larceny. 

The police were nolilit-d by a candy 
store owner that two thujas had at- 
tempted to empty her cash register but 
were frightened off. Their description.s 
were broadcast to R.M.P. cars in the 
vicinity and the patrolmen picked up 
two youths near the scene for investi- 
gation. Upon reaching the store, oiu- 
of the thugs whipped out a gun but 
was quickly subdued by Detectives 
Charles Fazio and P'rank Santelli who 
had arrived at the candy store to in- 
vestigate the complaint. 

The young thugs, who admitted they 
conleniplatcd a payroll holdup in the 
neighborhood, were held for assault, 
violation of 1897 P.L. and attempted 
robbery. 



LAST November 19, Patrolmen 
Martin Hechtman and Thomas 
Finnegan, 103rd Precinct, were ap- 
proached by a roomer who asked their 
assistance in obtaining some property 
from his landlord. 

When they reached the furnished 
room house, the landlord offered nu 
objection and the tenant began to 
gather up his belongings. As the patrol- 
men were about to leave, they noticed 
that there were four radios in the 
room. When he was unable to supply 
a satisfactory explanation of this idio- 
cyncrasy, Patrolmen Hechtman and 
Finnegan brought him to the 103n! 
Precinct, where it was discovered that 
the radios were the proceeds of burg- 
laries. The prisoner was on parole 
from Rikers Island where he had been 
serving time on an assault conviction. 



T^DTTTi months of painstakinf; snr- 
veiJlancc by r^iciih-narit Waller 
Casey and Detectives Thomas Berry 
and Edward Maney. Safe, Loft and 
TriK'k S(|uad, ended with the apj>re- 
liension of a experienced burglar with 
;m equally long record. 

\\ hen reports of burglaries in 
pliints manufacturing critical defense 
materials came to the squad last sum- 
mer, older members recalled a suspect 
who had a record of similar hurfilaries 
during World W ar II. Lieutenant 
Casey and Detectives Berry and 
Maney were assigned to keep tabs on 
the suspect. He proved very elusive 
and made several out-of-town trips 
to cities such as Chicago. Pitt.«burg. 
New Orleans and Detroit. Coinciden- 
tal with these trips were the discov- 
eries of major burglaries just after 
his return trip to New York. 

Finally, late in November, the sur- 
veillance commenced to pay off. The 
suspect was observed %isiting a ma- 
chine shop in lower Manhattan which 
is producing bolts essential for de- 
fense industries. During his visit to 
the shop, he apparently "cased" the 
plant and then, disdaining usual 
break-and-enter methods, he brazenly 
removed, during business hours, the 
tumbler of the building's front door 
lock and replaced it with a dummy 
chamber while he had a pass key 
made. Returning before the close of 
business on the same day, he replaced 
the original tumbler. This operation 
took place entirely without the build- 
ing occupants' knowledge. 

On Sunday, December 2, he re- 
turned to the scene with an accom- 
plice and removed ."iflO ])ounds of 
bolts. As they prepared to drive away 
from the building, the detectives 
stepped in and made the arrest. 

The ex-felon was held without bail 
for the burglary while his accomplice, 
who had no previous record, was held 
in .SI 0.000 bail. 



DON'T PASS n BY 

Page 29 of this issue is a ques- 
tionnaire for your comments on 
SPRING 3100. Fill it out and for- 
ward to the office of SPRING 3100. 



— 22 — 



P.D. - RETIRED - P.D. 



Slain Heroes Honored 



The following retirement applications were approved by the 
Board of Trustees of the Pension Fund at its meeting of 
November 19: 



August W. Floth 



Dote 

Appointed 

CHIEF INSPECTOR 

Dec. 30, 1921 



LIEUTENANT 

David P. A. Corcoran June 2, 1926 

SERGEANTS 

Howard F. Canlon 

Edwin H. Flood 

George J. B. Boullianne Oct. 

William A. Burke 



Hugh J. McCarron 
Edward F. Piskule 
Raymond T. Kelly 
Claude V. Ferguson 
Frank A. Walker 
Frank H. Smith 
Robert K. Franklin 
John H. Conk 
Frank J. Krohn 
Samuel Simon 
Clarence J. Houlroyd 
Andrew J. Mulhall 
Henry L. Kloetzer 
William F. Von Deesten 
David M. Koster 
Florindo P. Lauro 
Joseph A. Vespoli 
William J. Vincent 
Joseph E. Bimpson 
Norman L. Hudson 
Stephen A. Stanton 
William E. Bandon 
Herbert E. Severance 
Harry Brockstedt 
Raymond T. J. Gleason 
Thomas M. Sullivan 
John J. Bradt, Sr. 
John Byrne 
William E. Ruehl, Jr. 
Thomas J. Lane 
Rudolph R. McLaughlin 
Harold F. Schreck 
John J. Canavon 
George Conrad 
Michael Brady 
John King 
James A. Brady 
George L. O'Connor 
Hugh J. Clark 
Max Altman 



Commond 





INSPECTORS 




Herbert Golden 


Oct. 6, 1920 


23rd Div. 


Walter C. Harding 


Dec. 26, 1917 


6th Div. 



40th Pet. 



Feb. 


21, 


1928 


Traf. A 


June 


22, 


1925 


103rd Pet. 


Oct. 


5, 


1921 


114th Pet. 


Dec. 


2, 


1924 


D.D. Man. West 


PATROLMEN 




Jan. 


19, 


1931 


92nd Pet. 


July 


1, 


1931 


M.T.S. 


Oct. 


1, 


1931 


68th Pet. 


Feb. 


24, 


1928 


67th Pet. 


Sept. 


9, 


1926 


15th Pet. 


May 


1, 


1928 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


Oct. 


14, 


1930 


E.S.S. 14 


Mar. 


6, 


1925 


3rd Pet. 


Sept. 


25, 


1930 


101st Pet. 


June 


24, 


1930 


E.S.S. 14 


June 


16, 


1926 


48th Pet. 


June 


17, 


1926 


G.C.P. Pet. 


June 


24, 


1930 


105th Pet. 


Sept. 


25, 


1930 


24th Pet. 


May 


2, 


1927 


88th Pet. 


June 


24, 


1930 


109th Pet. 


Aug. 


4 


1916 


19th Pet. 


Sept. 


4 


1928 


83rd Pet. 


May 


4 


1916 


102nd Pet. 


Nov. 


22 


1926 


Traf. R 


June 


30 


1930 


E.S.S. 19 


Mar. 


28 


1930 


Off. 4th D.P.C. 


June 


16 


1926 


84th Pet. 


June 


26 


1929 


120th Pet. 


Oct. 


30 


1926 


28th Pet. 


Dec. 


2 


1924 


83rd Pet. 


July 


29 


1909 


Hq. Div. 


June 


4 


1915 


Traf. 1 


June 


11 


1912 


40th Pet. 


April 


7 


1931 


10th D.D. 


June 


21 


1926 


6th D.D. 


Feb. 


21 


1928 


15th D.D. 


Sept 


25 


1930 


17th Pet. 


Oct. 


19 


1925 


67th Pet. 


May 


5 


1920 


Traf. D 


Dec. 


18 


1930 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


Aug. 


27 


1925 


Cent.Off.Burs.&Sqds. 


June 


11 


1912 


Stat. &Crim.lden. Burs. 


Oct. 


16 


1923 


D.D. Man. West 


Dec. 


22 


, 1937 


Traf. F 




The 



"Detective Daggett" — Police Launch 



ON December 3, police launch No. 13 was officially com- 
missioned and added to the department's fleet. The new- 
boat was christened the "Detective James L. Daggett" in 
memory of the late detective who lost his life in the per- 
formance of police duty on September 11, 1951. Detective 
Daggett was killed in an arson blast while effecting the 
arrest of three suspected burglars. 

The "Detective James L. Daggett" is specifically designed 
for patrol and rescue problems in and around Jamaica Bay 
which is frequented by thousands of fishing and boating 
enthusiasts throughout the year. It is a flat-bottomed, 
tunnelled stern crash boat, 32 feet in length, with a speed 
of twenty knots and a carrying capacity of thirty persons. 
The launch will be based at the head of Barbadoes Basin, 
near Idlewild Airport. 

The "Detective Daggett" is the first police launch to be 
named after a policeman killed in the line of duty. All others 
were named after policemen who were killed while serving 
with the Armed Forces. 

Alfred Loreto Park 

New York City has officially honored the memory of 
heroic Patrolman Alfred Loreto, who was killed in Sep- 
tember 1950 while attempting to arrest three men who 
were committing an armed hold-up. A park located in the 
Bronx at Morris Park and Van Nest Avenues has been 
named the Alfred Loreto Park and will remain as a lasting 
tribute to the memory of the slain hero who resided in 
the Bronx. 




23 — 




,^,<,oz^''''^oro. 





Slow Night 

By SERGEANT JACOB BERKE, 
Traffic Precinct I 



It's a quarter past twelve and I'm about to lock up the 
I'umps, when a late car pulls in. I'm on my feet when 
I see it's Mr. LaTour, the boss. He parks beside the 
station, and comes in to sit. He's fifty, blimpy, and a very 
worrisome sort of man. It's his custom to drop in this way 
once or twice a week along toward the end of my shift." 
"Just to see that things is right," he always has to say. 

"Been doing anything?" he asks. "Pumped a couple hun- 
dred gallons between eight and eleven thirty, been pretty 
slow." "You left the tool rack door open." "I was fixing 
a flat." "You ain't fixin a flat now. Go lock it before they 
steal me blind." 

I go out and snap the padlock. When I get back, the old 
man is reading the results of the stock exchange to sec how 
his shares are progressing. According to his expression, 
you would think he is ready to file bankruptcy. "Traffic's 
about dried up," I tell him. I'd been figuring on closing. 
"We'll stay open for a while. The meeting ain't o\cr yet at 
the Eagles Hall. We'll maybe pump a few more gallons," 
he says. 

The old man always makes me feel uneasy when he sits 



here like this. I keep wishing some cars will pull in to give 
me something to do. None come. So I reach in the drawer 
and get a package of raisins and start flipping them one by 
one into my mouth. I do this to pass the time when things 
are slow. A nickel package lasts an hour when there's no 
cars to tend. The old man finishes the paper and drops it 
to the floor. He watches me, kind of sour, "ain'tcha got 
nothin' better to do?" "I swept the floor and cleaned the 
place before you came." "You make me nervous." "I like 
them," and to myself I say, "I sure have to take a lot of 
beef of that old bird for forty dollars a week." So to make 
him contented, I put the raisins away. 

It's about one o'clock now and I get to my feet when 
a big black sedan slides up to the pumps. Two guys climb 
out and push me back inside the station. One of them is 
small, w'ith thick lips, and bushy black brow's. The other 
guy is a six footer, slim and rangy. They're both sullen 
looking. The old man jumps off his chair, starting to 
splutter. The little guy points a gun at him, and says, "get 
back on it. Fatty, and behave, else we gotta fill you with 
lead, and wc have plenty on hand." To me, he says, "give." 



— 24- 



I open the cash register. The Old Man's face is cloaked in 
utter despair, but for once he is too scared to argue. The 
little guy snatches a sack from the till, and says, "stuff it in 
this." When I finish he tells me to go out, and fill the tank 
with high test. Don't try hailing no car if you want to keep 
healthy and peddle the gas," he warns me. The big guy 
keeps an eye on me while I'm filling the tank. The thought 
kicks me that the old man will hammer me later for giving 
them the high test gas. 

I see the little guy take the old man's wallet and wrist- 
watch which makes me feel good that I'm carrying only three 
lonesome ones in my pocket. The gas overflows and splashes 
on my feet. It's cold. I start to clean the windshield, but 
the big guy intervenes. "Can it and come on in," he says. 
I go inside and the little guy says, "where's your pliers?" 
I reach in my back pocket and he points to the telephone 
wire and says, "cut it." I do so and I can feel the old man 
hating me. I have severed his last hope. "That does it," the 
big guy says, "now don't you monkeys move till we're out 
of sight." As they leave, the little guy thanks me. "You've 
been a big help," he says. "Be seeing you," I say. He stops 
cold. "What do you mean," he snaps. "It's just a saying I 
use, like so long." They get into their car and gun out down 
Atlantic Avenue towards the Bridge. 

^ I *HE old man is hitting the sky. I am a traitor. I am a 
no-account chicken heart. I am a measly louse, the 
source of all principal grief. Furthermore, I am fired, with 
gusto. "Take it easy." I say. "Let's pick up McPadden, 
the cop." We jump in my car and spot him going into Hill- 
man's diner, two blocks away. I hustle McPadden away 
from his Java and give him a fill in on the story as we drive. 
The old man's .going nuts. "You crazy idiot," he's shouting, 
"where are you wheeling us?" "Aw, shut up, I tell him." 
I figure that I can talk to liim on equal footing now that I 
am fired. 

Less than a half mile from the station, we spot the- stick 
up car, parked at the curb. The two guys are in consultation 
beside it, very bewildered. I park double beside their car. 
Officer McPadden approaches them, gun in hand, telling 
them to stretch, as they are at the threshold of a mistake 
with fatal possibilities. They reach high and fast when 
they see McPadden's dispenser. Mac tosses me his hand- 
cuffs, and I tie the two guys together, thus ending the sus- 
pense. Mac then tells us that he'll march his charges to the 
corner police box and await the wagon. 

The old man slides up close to me regarding me with 
unashamed awe and respect. "My boy," he says in a tone 
that is warm and friendly, "how did you do it." I tell him, 
as I take out the box of raisins, wing a couple into the air, 
and scoop them neatly into my beak, "you oughta see them 
swell up in gasoline, just like ballons. Wouldn't take more 
than one to choke the gas line, but I dumped in half a pack 
to be sure." The old man flings his fat arm around my 
shoulder, and as we head towards my car, I bid farewell 
to Officer McPadden's captives. "Be seeing you," I tell them. 



■25 — 




Palroliiiaii Nealon Serving As Army Captain 
Killed ill Korea 



WORD came recently from the Ad- 
jutant General's Office in Wash- 
ington of the death in action in Korea 
of Patrolman Arthur J. Nealon. 62nil 
Precinct. 

A veteran of five years' service in 
the army in World War II. he was 
stationed in the China-Burma-India 
Theatre and was awarded an official 
commendation by the Chinese Govern- 
ment. Patrolman Nealon was recalled 
to active duty as a reserve Army offi- 
cer on October 3, 1950. He met his 
death while serving as a captain with 
Company H, 5th Cavalry Regiment of 
the 1st Cavalry Division. 

Appointed to the department on Feb- 
ruary 1, 1947, he was formerly a mem- 
ber of the New York State Police. He 
is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, a 
daughter, Jane, three sisters, and two 
brothers — Patrolman Henry Nealon, 
assigned to the 23rd Precinct, and 
Lieutenant Michael Nealon of the New 
York City Fire Department. 




Patrolman Nealon 

Deceased 



StouAin^ in the Xil^tatif 

by REBECCA B. RANKIN, Libranan 



Municipal Reference Library; 



The JJbrary keeps a file of the offi- 
cial publications of the New York 
State Association of Chiefs of Police. 
The 1950 Convention was held in 
Rochester. Borrow the volume of Pro- 
ceedings and read the speeches which 
vou did not hear. 



In the New York Herald Tribune 
of November 25 is an article by C. 
B. Colby entitled "Help, Police." It 
contains very helpful advice to the 
average citizen as when to notify po- 
lice and on what occasions not to 
bother the police. 



Denver is reported to be the first 
city to install a device to prevent mo- 
torists from using the unexpired time 
at vacant parking meter spaces. The 
mechanism is simple. It consists of a 
bar set into the pavement about mid- 
way in the parking space parallel with 
the curb. The bar is hooked electri- 



cally with the meter. A driver pulling 
out crosses the bar and this contact 
resets the meter. Since Denver officials 
believe that there is some question of 
the legality of the device, it is being 
installed experimentally at this time. 



The written test for promotion to 
sergeant has been scheduled for 
March 29, 1952. The Library has all 
the previous examinations which ha\e 
been held, including four special mili- 
tary ones during 1948-1950. Of course, 
you know we have up-to-date lists of 
best books to recommend and to loan 
the police. 

* * * 

Burton Turkus, Assistant to District 
Attorney O'Dwyer at the time of the 
Murder Incorporated investigation has 
written the story of the investigation 
and of the nation-wide crime syndicate 
it uncovered. With his co-author, Sid 
Feder, he has undertaken to reveal the 



sordid and criminal backgrounds of 
small-time hoodlums and big-shot gang- 
sters, of the evidence uncovered against 
them, and of the difficulties in the way 
of making charges "stick." The pic- 
ture he presents is a frightening one 
t<i all liDuest people. Murder Incorpo- 
rated, he claims, is still operating on a 
nationwide scale and he points to such 
a recent event as the unsolved murder 
nt' Charles Binaggio in Kansas City 
as an example. 

An especially interesting and timely 
pcjrtion of the book is that dealing 
with Abe Reles whose death — murder, 
suicide or accident — was recently the 
subject of a Grand Jury investigation. 

Mr. Turkus' comments on the Ke- 
fauver Committee investigations are 
also interesting though seldom compli- 
mentary. 

Altogether "Murder, Inc., the story 
of the Syndicate" is fascinating, if un- 
pleasant, reading. (New York: Far- 
rar, Straus, and Young, 1951. 498 p.) 



Some North Carolina police depart- 
ments are calling on modern science to 
help them control speeding on streets 
and highways. The device, christened 
the "whammy" by Greensboro police- 
men, is a radar speed meter which can 
accurately determine the speed of cars 
passing within 150 feet. In use it is 
mounted on a patrol car or on a porch 
and the speed of passing vehicles is re- 
corded. When a speeder is detected, 
his license number is sent by radio to 
a patrol car which hands out the speed- 
ing citation. 

Winston-Salem has been using the 
meter for about a year but it has not 
been bringing motorists into court on 
the radar evidence alone. Violators 
detected by the machine are mailed 
cards telling them of the speed viola- 
tion and asking co-operation in traffic 
safety by driving slower. Greensboro 
began using the meter in September 
and brought 19 motorists into court 
the first day. The Mecklenburg Coun- 
ty Police Department is purchasing a 
unit for testing purposes. Other cities 
and the State Highway Patrol have in- 
dicated interest in the meters but are 
hesitating to purchase one or many 
until the courts have indicated whether 
they will accept the meter readings as 
evidence in court. In the meantime 
law enforcement officials are pointing 
to the strong psychological eft'ect the 
radar control system can have on speed- 
ers even though the violators are not 
brought into court. 



— 26 — 



Now You Can Help Us! 



FOR the past two years, under the pres- 
ent editorship, SPRING 3100 has en- 
deavored to bring to its readers a well- 
rounded magazine which would have 
something of interest for everyone. A 
balanced issue does not just happen; it 
requires a lot of planning. 

The "student" and the "back-room law- 
yer" are interested in one type of maga- 
zine; devotees of "Looking 'Em Over" 
have other ideas on the contents. Our 
retired subscribers seldom fail to look 
over the retirements and the "In Memor- 
iam" page. Law enforcement personnel 
from other cities like informative articles 
on police procedure and practice. Our 
contemporary police publications appar- 
ently feel the same, because our factual 
articles have been reprinted throughout 
the world and in a wide variety of for- 
eign languages. 

Yet, every now and then, it is well to 
take stock of yourself. Despite the fact 
that our circulation has increased and 
that we occasionally receive a highly 
complimentary letter, v/e do wonder how 
close we come to fulfilling the require- 
ments of each type of reader. 

This is your opportunity to guide us in 
giving you the best possible magazine. 
The moment or two that is required to fill 
in the attached questionnaire will help us 
to decide where we should expand and 
where we can contract. The regular fea- 
tures of the magazine are listed. Next to 
each category are four possible com- 
ments. Check the box which best gives 
your opinion on how we should handle 
that feature in future issues, but remem- 
ber that your choices must be compressed 
into forty pages. No signature is neces- 
sary. Return the completed questionnaire 
directly to SPRING 3100, 400 Broome 
Street, either through the department 
mail or United States mail. 

The conclusions to be drawn from the 
tabulated results will be published at a 
later date if sufficient replies are received 
to make a valid sampling. This is your 
chance to hove a hand in guiding our 
policy. Mail the questionnaire today! 



QUESTIONNAIRE 



ITEM 

Letters to Editor 

Monthly Calendar 

Editorial 

Newspaper Hero Awards 

Feature Articles: 

INFORMATIVE such as "Motorcycle School," "Pickpocket 
Squad," "Article 2 Pension Fund" 

HISTORICAL such as "First Women in The Department," 
"Missing Persons Bureau," "Traffic Control in Retrospect" 

INSTRUCTIONAL such as "Motor Vehicle Accident Investiga- 
tion," "Bullet Holes in Glass," "Election Day" 

REPRINTS from other publications, such os "Coping with 
Disaster" 

CONDENSATIONS of other publications such os "Annual 
Report of Police Department," "Mayor's Committee on 
Teen-age Narcotic Addiction" 

PAL ACTIVITIES such as "PAL on Television," "PAL 
Photogropiiy" 

Awards and Commendations 
Promotions and Graduations 
All in the Day's Work 
Top Command 
Short Story 

Department Sports Activities 
The Old Forty-Niner 
Memo Book such as: 

"Narcotic Indentification," "Civilian Defense Procedures" 

Down the Line 

Study Hall 

Browsing in the Library 

Looking 'Em Over 

Amendments 

Wanted Page 

Retirements 

In Memoriam 

Cartoons 

Duty Charts 



I vote for: (Check one box) 

More Same Less None 

of Amount of of 



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□ Detective 
n Other Units 



(Reader; Please Check Box in Front of Appropriate 



n Retired 

□ Out-oMown P.D. 

Classification) 



Use Bottom of Page for Additional Remarks 

— 27 — 



Blueprint For Survival 

(Continued Irom poge 13) 

when necessary, during an emergency. In strategic places, 
fourteen traffic control points have been established to facili- 
tate the movement of civil defense forces. At the points, 
where the civil defense routes lead outside of the city, eight 
aid-check points have been established to serve as clearing 
points for mutual assistance vehicles arriving at or leaving 
the city. Operators of such vehicles are advised as to where 
they are needed and the best route. 

At the outset of the Red Alert of November 28, the 
police authorities of New Jersey, Westchester and Nassau 
Counties were notified and they cooperated wonderfully by 
halting all traffic to New York. Within the city all primary 
routes, as for example, the West Side Highway, the East 
River Drive and Canal Street, were completely cleared of 
vehicles. All bridges and tunnels in the city were cleared 
of traffic; and with the cooperation of the New Jersey 
autliorities and the Port Authority, so were the George 
Washington liridge. and the Hi)!l;md and Lincoln Tunnels. 

Public and Private Shelters 

As the Police. Air Wardens and Auxiliary Police com- 
bined their efforts to get everyone oft the streets, the public 
shelters took on an added significance. Up to that time, 
the average New Yorker only knew of the shelters as neatly 
printed signs indicating their existence. For many months 
prior, the Department of Housing and Buildings had been 
surveying locations for use as public shelters. ^V'hen found 
to meet certain basic requirements, the Police Department 
was advised. The Chief Engineer's Office then surveyed 
the exterior of the premises and chose the best possible 
location for the installation of the directional sign, indicat- 
ing the shelter. Where possible, the signs were attached to 
street lamps, traffic lights, or some other existing surface. 
1 f none was available, then the department installed a 
pipe-support in the ground. The shelter signs, themselves, 
have been designed and produced by the Chief Engineer's 
Office. There are 560 public shelters in existence at present 
and these have a capacity of less than 250,000 persons. 
.Surveys of 240 additional locations are under way. 

Just as important as the public shelters are the private 
shelters which the Police Department has been attempting 
to set up in every building within the city, with the excep- 
tion of one and two-family dwellings. These shelters are 
designed to take care of the needs of the building's occu- 
l)anls, both normal and transient. On August 18, 1950, 
even before the Air Warden Service was organized, the 
Police Department began to recruit and enroll Building 
Control Directors. 

It has been a most difficult undertaking. The Building 
Control Director is required to prepare plans for the orderly 
movement of people from all portions of the building to 
shelters. He must establish first aid rooms; provide fire 
watchers and fire-fighting equipment ; and control vital util- 
ities such as gas, electric, water and steam. According to 
Police Department statistics, there are almost 205,000 
buildings in the city that should be organized. Yet, only a 
little more than 75,000 buildings have designated a Build- 
ing Control Director. 



Fortunately, almost all the large industrial plants, office 
buildings, hotels, department stores, schools, hospitals, thea- 
tres and public buildings are organized. The inertia is to 
be found in multiple dwellings such as apartment houses, 
of which only about twenty per cent have designated a 
director. 



Building Control Program 

During the public drill of November 28, many buildings 
organized under the Building Control program, but not 
designated as public shelters, had a large influx of persons 
from the streets. One department store on 34th Street, 
which contained thirty thousand persons when the alert 
sounded, iiad anoliier 2,500 people enter within the next 
minute or so. Another department .store in the Union 
.Square area had 350 enter the store as the sirens sounded. 

Specialized units of the Police Department had also made 
elaborate plans in connection with the drill. The Emergency 
Service Division, augmented by the return of its off-duty 
members under the emergency chart placed into efl^ect by 
the Chief Inspector, dispatched its twenty emergency serv- 
ice trucks with full crews to important- centers of popula- 
tion-concentration, such as in the vicinity of railroad termi- 
nals, shopping areas and ferry terminals. Operation of the 
Radio Emergency Patrol cars continued and arrangements 
were made with the Communications Division to dispatch 
the nearest truck by radio if its equipment was needed by 
an R.E.P. car crew. 

The Harbor Precinct dispatched some of its returning 
ofif-duty members to the Randall's Island Launch Repair 
Shop where three launches were undergoing needed re- 
pairs. Temporary adjustments were made to permit these 
boats to join the rest of the fleet in patrolling the city's 
waterways. The balance of the returned Harbor Precinct 
men were transported to Welfare Island where they were 
assigned to foot patrol posts. 

The Aviation Bureau ordered a helicopter, based at Air- 
port No. 1 on the East River, to take to the air with the 
sounding of the Red Alert. As it flew over the city, its 
amplifying equipment advised the city's residents that it 
was an air raid drill and that they should take shelter. On 
a local basis, the Municipal Broadcasting Station WNYC, 
was doing the same by means of fifty-seven sound trucks 
which toured throughout the city. The station had prepared 
a standardized recording that emphasized that onlv an air 
raid test was in progress. Where the trucks were assigned 
to areas having a predominant foreign population, record- 
ings in that language were also played. 

In each sound truck, there was also a microphone for use 
by the police if necessary to give specific directions. For 
the most part, these trucks were donated by private con- 
cerns, to supplement the available sound trucks from city 
agencies. The Police Information Booth at 43rd Street and 
Broadway was also equipped with one of WNYC's re- 
cordings. 

As the air raid drill came to a close with the sounding 
of the All Clear signal, the police helicopter continued to 
hover over the city's main arteries and reported on traffic 
flow and potential congestion. 



— 28 — 




THE SEVEN TOP PROBATIONARY PATROLMEN of the December '51 class proudly display their trophies as Commissioner AAon- 
aghan and Mayor Impellitteri award the George Kelrick trophy to Prob. Polw. Mary L. Mclnnis. The new patrolmen are (I. to r.) 
Jack W. Clark, Jerry F. Joseph, Martin J. Flannery, Elmore Richman, Edward T. Harrington, Joseph E. Byrne, Jr., and James McGoey. 

Five Hundred Forty-Three Probationers Graduated 

Mirror Pistol Tournament Winners Receive Awards 



BEFORE an audience of friends and families, 543 pro- 
bationary patrolmen and policewomen were graduated 
into the active ranks of the force on December 10 at 
the Washington Irving High School. 

Mayor Vincent R. Impellitteri in addressing the gradu- 
ates noted that the force now stood at a strength of 18,781 
and that the quota of 20,030 had not yet been filled. He said, 
"A shortage of manpower in the Police Force is not desir- 
able and the ranks must be filled as quickly as possible. I 
intend to do all I can to appropriate the money necessary to 
fill the quota. To do otherwise would be a dangerous and 
false economy." 

In a heart warming speech, Commissioner George P. 
Monaghan welcomed the new recruits into the department. 
He greeted the men and women and their families by say- 
ing, "This is a happy occasion for all. It is an especially 
happy occasion for those wearing the blue for the first time 
because they are now police officers in action and deed. This 
is also an important day for the public too because with the 
assignment of these men to posts, the people of the citj' 
will have additional police protection." 

Highlight of the ceremonies was the awarding of trophies 
to the outstanding probationers of the class. The following 
won awards : 

Probationary Patrolman Jerry F. Joseph, Traffic A, 
awarded the Vincent R. Impellitteri trophy for having per- 
formed the outstanding act of police duty in the field during 
the training period. While off duty on October 24. he appre- 
hended two men who were breaking into an automobile. 

Probationary Patrolman Jack W. Clark, 88th Precinct, 
awarded the Hiram C. Bloomingdale trophy for having at- 
tained the highest general average in all subjects. 



Probationary Patrolman Martin J. Flannery, 22nd Pre- 
cinct, awarded the Honorable George P. Monaghan trophy 
for having attained the second highest general average in 
all subjects. 

Probationary Patrolman Elmore A. Rickman, 90th Pre- 
cinct, awarded the Chief Inspector's trophy for having at- 
tained the third highest general average in all subjects. 

Probationary Patrolman Edward T. Harrington, 28th 
Precinct, awarded the Edwin R. Masback trophy for having 
attained the highest average in pistol practice. 

Probationary Patrolman Joseph E. Byrne, Jr., 34th Pre- 
cinct, for having attained the highest general average in 
physical instruction. 

Probationar}' Patrolman James McGoey, 11th Precinct, 
awarded the Frank J. Keeler trophy for having attained the 
highest mental average. 

Probationary Policewoman Mary L. Mclnnis, Bureau 
of Policewomen, awarded the George Kelrick trophy for 
having been the most deserving student in her class. 

NEW YORK mRROR AW.4RDS 

The graduation exercises were also the scene of the 
_ awarding of trophies won by department members at the 
New York Mirror Pistol Tournament held in August. 

Sergeant l\Iark Walsh walked off with the lion's share of 
the awards, by winning the William Randolph Hearst Cup, 
the William Randolph Hearst Watch and the New York 
Mirror Award. 

Sergeant Frank Lantay won the James ^^'. Gerard Tro- 
phv and Detective Adelaide Knowles was awarded the Wo- 
men's Individual Championship Trophy. 



•29- 



Judge Castigates Holdup Man 
Who Shot Police Officer 



More Data From The Annual Report 



BKONX 
Jose 




PtI. J. Smith 



County Judge Samuel J. 
ph, last November 27, meted 
out a twotity to thirty year prison 

tirm !ci a man wh" 

P. had robbed a diner 
^ and a tavern, seven 
■ months before. The 
>■ tlni,t;'s partner re- 
ceived a thirty-five 
to sixty year term 
lor having shot Pa- 
trolman John Smith, 
I 41st Precinct, in the 
chest duringf the tav- 
ern hold-up. 

"Anyone who dares to lay a finger 
on a policeman can expect no mercy," 
Judge Joseph said. "I give notice to 
all thugs and bandits that they will he 
dealt with to the limit of the law if 
they resist or harm the police." 

Last April 28, Patrolman Smith was 
walking past the tavern while the rob- 
bery was in progress and saw the bar- 
tender with his hands raised. He in- 
tercepted the bandits as they rushed 
out but one of them managed to strike 
him in the face with a gun and, as 
the officer fell, fired a bullet into his 
body. Despite his wound, which came 
within a fraction of an inch of the 
patrolman's heart, Smith managed to 
regain his feet and succeeded in knock- 
ing the weapon from his assailant's 
hand with the night baton. Although 
the thugs escaped, they were subse- 
quently captured by other officers. 

Branding the gun-toter as "the low- 
est and most vicious of all criminals," 
Judge Joseph said that "only an act of 
God had .saved the life of Patrolman 
Smith." 

PATROLMAN ENTERS 
BROTHERHOOD 

Patrolman John F. Kavanagh, for- 
merly assigned to the 73rd Precinct, 
resigned from the department on Octo- 
ber 23, 1951 to continue his studies in 
the Congregation of the Brothers of 
the Christian Schools. He entered the 
department in 1947 after having served 
four years in the Air Force in World 
War II. His former residence was at 
841 East 45th Street, Bronklvn, 
New York. 



THE September 1951 issue of 
S|)ring 3100 contained a resume 
of the interesting information from the 
1950 Animal Kejwrt of the Police De- 
partment, .'■ipace limitations necessitat- 
ed the omission of certain items. They 
are included at this time in the interest 
of those who have been unable tf) olitain 
a copy of the full report. 

Incidentally, the statistics enumerat- 
ed in the September issue under "Traf- 
fic Safety" are those of 1950 and not 
of 1949. 

ILLUMINATED POLICE SIGNS- Illumi- 
nated police signs were installed over 
signal boxes on the Grand Central 
Parkway and the Belt Parkway. This 
completes the installation of such signs 
on all parlcways in the city. 

STEAMSHIP PIERS -— The Steamship 
.Squad, operating along the trans-Atlan- 
tic piers on the North and East Rivers 
regulated the arrival and departure of 
more than 663,000 passengers and 
3,318.000 visitors. 

POLICE ACADEMY— The basic train- 
ing of the 1,274 new recruits in the 
Police Academv consisted of 108 hours 
of mental instruction, 108 hours of 
phvsical instruction. 96 hours of traf- 
fic duty, 48 hours of pistol practice and 
144 hours of field duty. The class of 
November 1950, comprising 482 re- 
cruits, received special training in 
plainclothes work. 

MOTOR TRANSPORT MAINTENANCE 
DIVISION— The 1.700 vehicles main, 
taiticd bv this division travelled more 
than 27,000,000 miles during 1950. In 
iddition to its efficient maintenance ac- 
tivities, the division performed other 
services, as refilling 359 fire extin- 
guishers, issuing 160 body covers, and 
towing 4,452 \ehicles other than those 
assigned to the departinent. 

DIVISION OF LICENSES— Based upon 
the number of licenses issued bv the 
various bureaus within the Division of 
Licenses, there were in the citv 320 
dance halls, 1,459 cabarets, 39,.346 hack 
drivers. 11,801 taxicabs and 93 horse- 
drawn vehicles. This latter represents 
a reduction from 105 in 1949. Also 
issued were 21,847 permits to carry 
pistols on the person and 1,563 per- 
mits to have pistols on the premises. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT — Expendi- 
tures by the department for the fiscal 
period 1949-1950 amounted to $99,- 
270,580.23. This represented an in- 
crease of $2,730,402.68 which was re- 
quired for salaries, wages and pen- 



sions of the personnel. Expenditures 
for equipment decreased by $27,- 
972.45 as compared with the previous 
year. 

POLICE PENSION FUND The Police 
I'ension lund i .\rliele 1) reported 
that 265 members of the force retired 
for service and 28 retired for dis- 
ability during the fiscal vear July 1, 
1949, to June 30, 1950. 'Of the '265 
who retired, the length of service of 
the majority was as follows : 

Length of Service Number 

20 years anrl under 21 96 

21 years and under 22 49 

22 years and under 23 31 

For the entire 265, the average length 
of service was 23.5 years. 

MENDICANT SQUAD— In addition to 
numerous arrests for begging and un- 
licensed pedding, an unusual aspect of 
the .squad's activity is the four arrests 
for "wiping windshield." 

PENSION AND RELIEF BUREAU— Of 
the 78 apjjlicants for relief which 
were received, 43 were approved. 

BUREAU OF PLANNING AND OPERA- 
TIONS — One of the big problems which 
faced this bureau at the beginning of 
1950 was the city-wide coal shortage. 
Surveys were made of the quantity of 
coal on hand in the 213 coal yards in 
the city. A Priorities and Allocations 
Board was set up at Police Head- 
uarters and granted the p>ower to 
ration and control available coal stocks 
to insure equitable distribution and 
preferential treattiient where necessary. 
Numerous forms, instructions, assign- 
ments and orders were promulgated so 
as to carry out the provisions of vari- 
ous State orders. 

BUILDING AND REPAIR BUREAU 
This bureau maintained and serviced 
120 department buildings during the 
year. In connection therewith, it pre- 
pared plans and specifications. 

POLICE ATHLETIC LEAGUE — The 

vear's membership was 73,815 boys 
and girls between the a,ges of seven 
and twenty-one years. The league 
operated 102 full-time and part-time 
centers. It conducted seventy-three 
plavstreets and playgrounds under paid 
supervision. This was thirteen more 
than in 1949. 

.■\ Dental Unit, on the stvle of the 
Medical fi^nit started in 1949, was 
established to provide free dental work- 
tor PAL members in seven of the 
centers. 



— 30 



STUDY 



POLICE ACADEMY 




HALL 



JANUARY, 1952 



QUESTION NO. 1 

What specific precaution will a desk officer observe be- 
fore he accepts as bail the property of two or more persons 
who own real property jointly? 

QUESTION NO. 2 

What value requirement should real estate possess when 
it is offered as bail by a surety ? 

QUESTION NO. 3 

What two subjects will appear as indexed on the last 
page (No. 600) of the Blotter? 

QUESTION NO. 4 

In what circumstance will five copies of the Charges and 
Specifications be prepared? 

QUESTION NO. 5 

What disposition will be made of the Individual Delin- 
quency Record (UF 42) when a patrolman is transferred 
to another command? 

QUESTION NO. 6 

Which department unit will a member of the force notify 
when he wishes to communicate by phone with any person 
or department outside of the city? 

QUESTION NO. 7 

Name the t\vo department forms on which complaints 
nf missing persons will be recorded. 

QUESTION NO. 8 

In what department unit will the unnecessary noise re- 
ports of the entire department be filed for statistical and 
reference purposes? 

QUESTION NO. 9 

What two department forms will a member of the force 
convey to his new command when he is transferred? 

QUESTION NO. 10 

State five types of cases that will he arraigned in the 
Vehicle Accident Courts. 

QUESTION NO. 11 

What will a member of the force ascertain when he is 
requested to summon an ambulance for a maternity case ? 
State his action and reason for doing same. 

QUESTION NO. 12 

State the immediate and subsequent action of a force 
member who comes into possession of a lost child. 



QUESTION NO. 13 

State the responsibility of a desk officer relative to the 
search of a dead human body that is found in a public place. 

QUESTION NO. 14 

List three circumstances when the identification Tag 
( UF 95) will be placed on bodies. 

QUESTION NO. 15 

Under what circumstances will the precinct file copy of 
an aided card of a dead human body be signed by the desk 
officer and filed when a notification to the relatives of the 
deceased has not been made? 

QUESTION NO. 16 

What will be considered a street accident case for the 
purposes of Article 1 of the Manual of Procedure? 

QUESTION NO. 17 

Under what conditions will a desk officer permit the re- 
moval of a motor vehicle involved in an accident that has 
caused death or serious injury when an examination of 
such vehicle has disclosed a mechanical defect? 

QUESTION NO. 18 

What precaution will a member of the force in charge at 
the scene of an aircraft accident take relative to obligations 
of the pilot? 



ANSWER NO. 1 

He will not accept the property as security unless all of 
the persons appearing on the deed as the grantees thereof 
execute the bond CUT 23). TAuth. : Article ?>, Paragraph 

?,2.) 

ANSWER NO. 2 

Surety must have a clear equity of double the amount of 
required bail, above all encumbrances, and amounting to at 
least $1000. based only on the assessed valuation appearing 
on the current tax bill after deductions for mortgages, liens 
or other undertakings. (Auth.: Article 3, Paragraph 30c.) 

ANSWER NO. 3 

a. Current Raided Premises: b. Records taken from a 
command. fAuth. : Article 4, Paragraphs 4 to 7.) 

ANSWER NO. 4 

When prepared in other than the command of the mem- 
ber of the force charged with the delinquency. TAuth. : 
Article 5. Paragraph 2d.) 

(Continued on next page) 



The questions and answers in this section were prepared by Lieutenant Sanford D. Garelik, Police Academy. 
This material is restricted and cannot be used in other publications without the permission of the Editor. 



31 



ANSWER NO. 5 

It is forwarded to the office of the district, division or 
bureau conceniecl, (^Auth. : Article 5, Paragraph 7.) 

ANSWER NO. 6 

He shall notify the Statistical, Correspondence and Rec- 
ords Bureau. (Autli. : .\rticle 6, Paragraph 14b.) 

ANSWER NO. 7 

a. L'i' oO (Conipaints — Chronological Record) ; b. DD 
13 (Report of Missing or Unidentified Person). (Auth. : 
Article 7, I"'aragraph 2d.) 



ANSWER NO. 8 

Safety Bureau, Traffic Division. (Auth. 
graph 5'2.) 



Article 7, Para- 



ANSWER NO. 9 

a. force Record (UF 10); b. Time Record (UI^ 11). 
If member is sick or suspended when transferred, the 
forms will be forwarded through the Distributing Room. 
(Auth.: Article 9, Paragraph 71.) 

ANSWER NO. 10 

a. Homicide by a vehicle ; b. Penal Law, Sec. 244, Subd. 
2 (As.sault by vehicle) ; c. Driving motor vehicle or motor- 
cycle while intoxicated; d. Leaving scene of an accident 
after injury to person or property; e. If foregoing charge 
is made, all other charges in connection therewith and aris- 
ing out of operation of a motor vehicle or motorcycle. 
CAuth.: Court Chart in rear of Manual of Procedure.) 

ANSWER NO. 11 

If birth is premature and, if so, advise the Communica- 
tions Bureau which makes request for Premature Trans- 
port Service through the Department of Health. (Auth.: 
-Article 1, Paragrapji 6.) 

ANSWER NO. 12 

Imnifdiatel}- notify desk officer by signal box or tele- 
phone. Then make brief inquiry on post and, if guardian 
not located, bring child to station house. (Auth. : Article 1, 
Paragraph 13.) 

ANSWER NO. 13 

He directs that .body and effects be searched under super- 
vision of a superior officer and before one or more respon- 
sible civilians when practicable. If practicable, search at 
scene. Use policewoman for female. TAuth. : Article 1 . 
Paragraph 21b.) 

ANSWER NO. 14 

a. Dead persons at scene of accident, b. Unconscious 
persons at scene of accident, c. Dead bodies that are to be 
delivered to morgue for examination by the Medical Exam- 
iner. (Auth.: Article 1, Paragraph 25.) 

ANSWER NO. 15 

When the precinct squad detective that is assigned reports 
that he was unable to locate relative or friends of the de- 
ceased, and has so notified the Missing Persons Bureau 
which information is entered on the U.F. 6. (Auth. : Article 
1, Paragraph 26.) 

ANSWER NO. 16 

Only vehicular street accidents. A "Vehicular Street Ac- 
cident" is one which occurs on the street between the build- 



ing lines, and a vcjhicle is involved, f Auth. : Article 1, Para- 
graph 29.) 

ANSWER NO. 17 

a. If vehicle is towed by a tow truck capable of lifting 
the front or rear end of the vehicle from ground; b. Before 
release of vehicle, if defect has been corrected, obtain signed 
statement from adjuster to that effect and file with receipt 
for vehicle in the Property Receipt Book. (Article 1 Para- 
graph 34.) 

ANSWER NO. 18 

a. If pilot is not suffering from injuries that necessitate 
removal to hospital, do not permit him to leave scene until 
after questioning by responsible authority ; b. Advise pilot 
of his or owner's responsibility to make report to the station 
house of accident occurrence within 10 hours. (Auth. : Arti- 
cle 1, Paragraphs 38 and 39.) 







CORRECTION 






n the December, 


1951 issue on page 26, 


Subdivision 2 


of 


Section 100 of 


the Traffic Regulations 


read in part. 


" ^ 


. . except that a 


siren may be attached 


to a bicycle " 


Th 


s should have read, ". . . except that a 


horn, bell or 


off 


er device except 


a siren may be attached 


to a bicycle." 



PROMOTION COURSE 

Preporotion for 
Sergeant — Lieutenant — Captain 

Monday 7:30 P.M. 

Tuesday 10:30 A.M. 

Wednesday 5:30 P.M. 

Thursday 11:30 A.M. 

Friday 5:30 P.M. 

(No session on holidays) 

at 

Officers' Training Scool 

7 Hubert Street, Manhattan 

(One-half block from Hudson Street) 

Transportation 

independent Subway System— Canal Street Station 

I.R.T. System, 7th Ave. Line— Canal or Franklin 
Street Stations 

I.R.T. System, Lexington Ave. Line — Canal and 
Lafayette Station 

B.M.T. System— Canal and Broadv/ay Station 

topics will be changed weekly. Each class ses- 
sion will be for a period of fwo hours. Attendance 
will be on time off duty. No fee will be charged. 



— 32 — 



The Old Forty-Niner 

(Continued from page 10) 

following day. 

Old Sol's rays as they came over the flats of Harlem, 
found the Old Forty-Niner at the doors of the 28th Pre- 
cinct. He was met by the captain, Beale, Hennessey and 
Hughes. The rays of the decorations on their uniforms 
sparkled stronger than the sun. "Take them off," Old Forty- 
Niner shouted. "You're blinding me." They led him into the 
back room and when his eyes had become normal again, the 
interview began. 

The precinct reporter had been correct. Richard Beale, 
first grade patrolman, with eight years in the job has earned 
eleven awards. Over this short span of time, he collected 
five commendations, five meritorious police duty and one 
excellent police duty. Dick had a little trouble remembering 
whether he won the awards when he was on the car or 
when he was doing foot patrol. 

"There was the time I was sitting in the car at about 
11 :30 P.M., waiting for my partner who had gone into a 
building on a routine complaint. Suddenly a woman ran up 
and told me that a man obviously nuts, was terrorizing the 
next street by waving a gun at everybody and threatening 
to shoot. I left the car and ran to the street. It was com- 
pletely empty except for this man who was shouting and 
waving that gun. Fortunately, his back was turned to me. 
I crept down the street, hoping that he wouldn't turn 
around. My luck held until I was a few feet from him. 
Then he turned. I made a dive for him. The gun and both 
of us went down together. Just then my partner arrived 
and we were both able to take care of him. That gun was 
loaded — but full — and he had forty cartridges on him." 

"How about the time," young John Hennessey said, 
"when we were both riding together and were stopped by 
someone who said that a man had gone berserk and was 
threatening a crowd with a gun. That was a hot one. We 
went scooting down the street, the wrong way, trying to 
cut off this guy who w-as running between the parked cars 
like a rabbit — except that he had a gun. We didn't know if 
it was loaded. You don't have much chance to think of those 
things when you're in the middle of it. We finally cut him 
oiif behind a parked car. Beale ran around and tackled him 
from the rear, getting a grip on the gun. I jumped him from 
the front and together we took that gun away. It was loaded, 
cocked and ready to go off. Me? I've only got four com- 
mendations and two meritorious police duty awards." 

"How about you?," Old Forty-Niner asked Joe Hughes 
who had been listening quietly. "Well, I've got five com- 
mendations, tW'O meritorious police duty and one excellent 
police duty — and a letter of commendation from the Fire 
Department. I got a commendation for that one. A tene- 
ment caught fire and as luck would have it, there was a 
children's nursery on the fifth floor. My partner and I 
dashed up those steps and pulled out eight kids and the wo- 
man who ran the nursery. That was a tough one — it was a 
three alarm blaze and the whole building finally went up." 

"Was that the toughest case you were on?" Old Forty- 
Niner asked. 

All three men thought a while and finallv Hennessey 
laughed and said, "You know, it's a funny thing but some- 
times the toughest ones are the ones that go by the board. 
Once Beale and I had to take in a man for disorderly con- 
duct — and that guy fought us tooth and nail all the way 
back to the station house. Another cop came over to help — 



it turned out to be my brother — and the three of us finally 
brought him in." 

"Yeah," said Beale, "I went to the hospital with bites on 
my ear and arms, and Hennessey had to get some cuts fixed 
up. I was on sick report for two weeks. That was the 
toughest case we ever had — and yet it went on the blotter 
as only a disorderly conduct case." 

Hughes said, "I'll go along with that. Say, we don't know 
how you got to us, but now that you're here did you know 
that the three of us were all in the same class in the Police 
Academy and that we all have brothers in the job?" Old 
Forty-Niner didn't know it but Dick Beale has a brother, 
Warren in the 25th Precinct ; John Hennessey has a brother, 
James, in the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Joe 
Hughes' brother, William, is in the 30th Precinct. "It's nice 
to know there are more at home like you," Old Forty-Niner 
said earnestly. 

Beale looked at the clock on the wall. "Gee, I've got to 
go or I'll be late for the Honor Committee Meeting." 

"OK, fellows, and thanks. I think I've got enough," the 
Old Forty-Niner said. The captain caught up with him as 
he was going out the door. 

"I just wanted to tell you how good those three men 
really are. They are "all cop," every inch of them. You 
never hear them complain about time in court ; they don't 
watch the clock. If they see anything, no matter what the 
time is, they go into action. You couldn't ask for better 
men." 

By the time he got back to headquarters, the Old Forty- 
Niner found that Patrolman Weiboldt had been burning up 
the wires trying to get him. 

"Wow !", he said, "I almost let one of the biggest ones 
get away. I took another look around the precinct and I 
found that I left out Arthur Young. I don't know how I 
did it — but this guy's got nine citations — five commenda- 
tions and four excellent police duties. In addition, he's a 
great guy and one of the best liked in the precinct. Being a 
fine athlete probably helped him to win all those awards. 
He's a crackerjack hand-ball player and Harlem's YMCA 
chose him as a perfect physical specimen. I could go on but 
just put him down for being a credit to the department!" 
Old Forty-Niner said he would do that and was sorry that 
he had missed meeting him at the precinct. 

"I'll bet there are lots of men who can tie or beat these 
records," he mused. "They do their work faithfully and 
conscientiously, building up great records of achievement 
for themselves and the department. Who are the other un- 
sung heroes in the department? Send their names and rec- 
ords to SPRING 3100 and perhaps we can give them a 
blow." 

WELCOME 107th 

(Continued from page 5} 

tional money and contracts were awarded within the first 
ten days of December. Work on the building was sched- 
uled to commence on January 10, 1949. 

As the building neared completion, the Board of Esti- 
mate on September 15, 1949 approved an expenditure, not 
to exceed S8,500 for the purchase of desks, typewriters, 
chairs, tables, filing cabinets, fifteen beds and 200 metal 
lockers. The opening ceremonies took place on November 
28, 1940, 

SPRING 3100 acknowledges the helpful assistance re- 
ceived in the preparation of this article from Acting Super- 
intendent of Buildings Byron P. Wilson, R.A.; Captain 
GeofFrey P. Shea of the 66th Precinct; and Acting Sergeant 
Joseph H. Lestrange of the Building and Repair Bureau. 



— 33 



t^ci^H the /the 



News About Police Department Organizations 



PBA-UFA Unite For Fair Pay 



ON December 11 at a meeting held 
at the Hunter College auditorium 
by the Police-Fire Fair Pay Commit- 
tee, more than 7,000 men passed a 
resolution to petition the Board of 
Estimate to increase salaries by thirty 
per cent. The meeting was the opening 
gun in a campaign to arouse public 
opinion on the need for a substantial 
pay increase for the Police and Fire 
Departments. 

The PBA has also been active in 
Albany where First Vice-President 
Mario Biaggi has been meeting with 
Lieutenant Governor Frank C. Moore 
and Senate Majority Leader Arthur 
Wicks. Purpose of the conferences is 
to pursuade these officials of the neces- 
sity for adopting PBA legislation on 
the five-day, forty-hour week. It was 
learned that the feeling in Albany is 



that the matter is strictly one for each 
municipality to determine and that the 
solution lies with city officials. 

Meanwhile in the city, three police 
line organization representatives are 
part of the council set up to define a 
labor relations board for city em- 
ployees. The three police representa- 
tives are John E. Carton and Mario 
Biaggi of the PBA and James Sheri- 
dan, president of the Sergeants' Be- 
nevolent Association. These men were 
selected by all the police line organiza- 
tions to serve as representatives for 
the police. Also represented on the 
committee are the Civil Service Forum, 
the Commerce and Industry Associa- 
tion, the Citizens Union, the Civil Serv- 
ice Reform League, Transit Police, 
Women's Trade Unionist League, and 
the New York County Bar Association. 



THE TRAFFIC SQUAD BENEVOLENT AS- 
SOCIATION will hold its next meeting 
on Thursday, Januar)' 31. The asso- 
ciation reports that its annual dance 
was a tremendous success, and that 
spurred on by this, a membership drive 
will be launched to make every traffic 
man an association member. 

THE SHOMRIM SOCIETY will hold in- 
stallation ceremonies for its new board 
of officers at the Riverside Plaza Hotel 
on January 21, 1952. The following 
officers will be installed : 

George Bopp President 

Sidney Rocker 1st Vice-Pres. 

Louis Weiser 2nd Vice-Pres. 

Harry Schreiber Treasurer 

Samuel Pierson _ Fin. Sec'y 

Jacob J. Levit Rec. Sec'y 



Seymour Blau Sgt.-at-Arms 

Joseph Fink Ass't Sgt.-at-Arms 

Jacob Isaacson Marshal 

Emanuel Zwerling Trustee 

THE ST. GEORGE ASSOCIATION will 
hold its next meeting on Thursday, 
January 3, 1952, at the Masonic Build- 
ing, 71 West 23rd St. At this meeting, 
the following officers elected to serve 
for 1952 will be installed by the Hon. 
Gustave W. M. Wieboldt: 

William Klingenbeck ...President 

John Toll _ 1st Vice-Pres. 

Conrad Myck 2nd Vice-Pres. 

Charles J. Roehm Rec. Sec'y 

John O. Becker Treasurer 

Gustave Herr Fin. Secretary 

The following were elected to the 
Executive Committee : Charles Wer- 

— 34 — 



ner, Eric Weidanz, Edwin Barker, 
John Kurka, Edward Lehane, Albert 
Miller, Herman Lampe, and Howard 
Van Dover. 



THE HONOR LEGION has elected its 
new board of officers for the year 1952. 
The new board will be installed at a 
dinner and dance to be held at the Park 
Sheraton Hotel on January 17. The 
following were elected : 

David Salter President 

James McDonnell 1st Vice-Pres. 

John Concannon 2nd Vice-Pres. 

John Brostek Treasurer 

William Kelly Financial Sec'y 

Martin Gillen Recording Sec'y 

Julius Stockhouse Sg^.-at-Arms 

Gustave G. Herr Sgt.-at-Arms 

Vincent Tabano Color Sergeant 

Harry A. Erickson Marshal 

Edgar Cooke —Historian 

Charles Mannkopf Ritualist 

Thomas Burns Del.-at-Large 

Wm. Lawrence Del.-at-Large 



PENDING LEGISLATION 

Of interest to policemen, is the bill 
introduced in the City Council in early 
December by Councilman Hugh Quinn 
which would charge commercial firms 
a fee for guarding payrolls which the 
department now docs without cost as 
part of its crime prevention activities. 
The rate would be $5 per hour per 
man and it is estimated that the city 
would derive revenue aggregating $5,- 
200,000 a year as a result of these 
charges. The bill has been referred to 
the Finance Committee for further 
study. 



POST 460 INSTALLATION 




THE NEW YORK CITY POLICE POST 460, AMERICAN LEGION installed its new board 
of officers at a dinner held on November 24 at the Henry Hudson Hotel. Standing, 
left to right: Joseph Murtha, John Becak, William Graham, Frank Hartnett, James 
Linden. Seated, left to right: Edward Conlin, Henry Koch, Edward Peyton, John Lawlor, 
Joseph Geroty and Charles Graham. 



THE NEW YORK CITY POLICE GARRI- 
SON 3100 will install its new com- 
mander Robert Kelly of Mounted 
Squadron No. 2, at a dinner-dance to 
be held on January 5 at Lenox Man- 
sion, 254 East 2nd Street. The garri- 
son will hold its regnlar business meet- 
ing at the Fraternal Clubhouse at 110 
West 48th Street on January 14 at 
8:30 P.M. 

THE POLICE SQUARE CLUB will hold a 
dinner-dance on January 15 at the St. 
George Hotel in Brooklyn at which the 
following officers will be installed for 
the year 1952 : 

John S. Filshie President 

Isrel Janowitz _ 1st Vice-Pres. 

William Spengler 2nd Vice-Pres. 

THE CIVILIAN COUNCIL 179 will install 
its new board of ofificers at a dinner 
to be held at the Henry Hudson Hotel 
on January 17, 1952. The following 
members will be inducted : 

Walter S. Drechsler President 

Leo Bruzza . - .Vice-Pres. 



Irving Weber Vice-Pres. 

Leo Malwitz Vice-Pres. 

Al Coftey Vice-Pres. 

Warren A. Rogers Treasurer 

Nathan Stein Recording Sec'y 

George Kraus Financial Sec'y 

Virginia McCormack Historian 

Walter Neuberger Sgt.-at-Arms 

Executive Committee 

Frederick Wendt, Saul Brandler, An- 
thony Ciringioni, Elliot Racer, Eddie 
Englebracht, Alex Thomas, Frank Or- 
televa, Thomas Cloonan. Aaron Kal- 
isch, William Carolan. 

The Civilian Council finds itself 
greatly disappointed in the findings of 
the recently published Griffenhagen re- 
port. Interpreting the report as a 
means of downgrading all groups and 
lowering salaries, the new board of 
officers has pledged itself to correct 
these findings. 



THE COLUMBIA ASSOCIATION will hold 
its next meeting on Tuesday evening, 
January 15 at Werdermann Hall. The 
meeting is of particular importance to 
all members since nomination of offi- 
cers for the year 1952 will be held. All 
members are urged to attend. 

Did You Know That: 

1885— Prison ward established in Bellevue. 

1885— Police Relief Fund established by 
law. 

1899— Line-up established. 

1907— Police dogs first used after study 
of methods in Ghent, Belgium. 

1907— First gasoline and electric patrol 
wagons used experimentally. 

1912— First matron promoted to detective 
for excellent work. 

1918— "Campfires" were held for the en- 
tire force as morale builders. Suit- 
able grounds were selected within 
the city limits to which 1000 men 
reported each day. They indulged 
in athletics during the day, were 
served an evening meal at cost. 
Then they gathered round a camp- 
fire and listened to talks by super- 
ior officers of the department. Pur- 
pose of the "Campfires" was to 
"break down constraint between 
the ranks without impairing disci- 
pline". 

1922— First white guide lines painted in 
Central Park. Bureau of Public 
Safety inaugurated. 

1923— Commissioner states traffic has 
reached saturation point. Hope is 
expressed that the airplane would 
decrease congestion within twenty 
years. 

1930— Bureau of Engineering charged 
with maintenance, installation and 
design of all traffic devices. 

1948— Ninth and Tenth Avenue mode 
one-ways. 

1949— Traffic Commission formed. 

1 950— Department of Traffic inaugurated. 

1951— The use of police dogs discontinu- 
ed. Last four dogs turned over to 
the A.S.P.C.A. 

1951— The quarters used by Emergency 
Service Squad No. 19 are leased 
by the city from the Bayside Fire 
Department, Inc. 



35 




NO 'CM OVEn 



MANHATTAN 

3rd PRECINCT: Famous sayings: "Sign two, keep one." Rookies 
in this job may be unfamiliar with this phrase but they can ask any 
old timer for further facts — ; he speaks from experience. . . . 
Going, going, gone: Ed Straub and John Conk — both recently re- 
tired and well established in the outside world. Good luck, boys, and 
may you live to be 100. Could be maybe a few more will be gone 
before this goes to press ; one I know will be affected by the 63-year 
retirement bill, Nick Paul. Don't know for sure — but by the looks 
of things now, he will also be gone. Well done; now you can sit back 
and watch the buffaloes take over. . . . Prospective Sergeants : Jim 
Collins and George Blumenthal ; could be tliey might beat this 
edition to press and have the gold badge before the first of the year. 
Not a bad couple of guys. Good luck "sergeants.". . . Maybe you 
haven't heard; Ed Derle goes in for swimming — in the East River 
of all places. Can't rightly remember if it was a Saturday nite or 
not, but wet he got. . . . What patrolman swore off riding in cabs 
since his last experience? What patrolman is so devoted to duty, he 
comes in on his "48"? Could his name begin with an "L" and end 
with and "N"? You guess who — the patrolman who when he hears 
anything is wrong will invariably try to fix it, whether jou consent 
to it or not. I said — "try to fix it" and when he gets through will 
say "you need some new parts, the thing don't work" . . . Bright 
saying during the recent Air Raid drill while assigned to CD. 
Hdqts. : Who, when told that theoretically the Brooklyn Bridge had 
been bombed, cutely remarked — "Gee, now how am I going to get 
home? They should have picked on some other bridge." Only one 
guy could say a thing like that and get away with it— Could his 
name begin with a "D" and end with an "R" . . . Added starters 
from the 3rd Squad; boys in the 3rd Squad are curious to know 
if Detective Lemonice is Italian or French. Detective Bova can 
answer that ; he works with him — "sometimes" . . , Larry Naughton 




The 8th's Jim McDonnell. 



still on sick leave — Here's hoping for a speedy recovery Larry — The 
boys miss you. Don't know if its news to you, never mentioned it 
in this column — but a good guy now bats first for the 3rd Squad — 
Act. Lt. Edmund A. Donnelly. Don't know what else to add so will 
end with an old saying— THE SAFEST PLACE TO KEEP A 
SECRET IS IN YOUR HEAD— So long. 

8lh PRECINCT. Thumbnail sketch : The photogenic patrolman 
pictured here, although young in years, has become quite a popular 
gendarme in our midst. Jim McDonnell has the tenacity and forceful 
personality necessary for the successful policeman; he is a credit 

a to himself, the command, and the 

department. Says Speedy Gonzalez 
of Jim, "He is truly the man to 
stamp out crime." — His liobby and 
greatest joy is little Jimmy Jr. . . . 
\ Congratulations are in order for 

_ Dom Largo and Harry Rosenstock 

who lately joined the Ancient Order 
of Beaming Grandpas. Bill O'Rourke 
informs us that 01' Deck Keane is 
turning a deep green with envy. . . . 
Bert Alvins obtained one of the best 
haircuts of his life when the Pepper 
Tycoon of Richmond County trim- 
med his locks. Hue}' Brockhues, 
beaming daddy of a brand new baby girl is impatiently waiting for 
his hair to grow longer so he can be in line for the next tonsorial 
job. . . . Tom Farley is the proud poppa of a baby girl No. 2. • . . 
Still another father of a new bambino is Sal Sardcgna, demon 
sergeant's chauffeur, who almost achieved sartorial elegance 
by turning out in brown shoes. Seems, if memory serves us right, 
there was once another sergeants' chauffeur who tried that same 
stunt some years back — (Initials W. S.) . . . Ted Potter secretly 
ordering new uniforms to the dismay of Harry Cohen and Moe 
Schleier. . . . George Luzzi promoted to the downstairs locker room. 
He is to be accorded new deference, and joins the stellar company 
of Henry Kelly, Joe Paganucci, and Paul Ludwig, celebrated in song 
and story. Freddie Cambria and Ray Layden are heartbroken at 
Blackie's absence. . . . Waiting impatiently for the sirens to sound, 
the fabulous Ludwig was the FIRST in the city to hear the wailing 
before anyone else. Rushing into the S. H., he warned all that the 
Air Raid Drill had begun prematurely. Upon investigation, Captain 
Krantz calmed Paul by informing him that the siren was only a 
D. S. truck hoist in operation. — For Sale: complete set of uniforms, 
cheap. See P. L. . . . Heartiest congratulations and best wishes to 
Ray Jaques, recently promoted to sergenat, and currently supervis- 
ing patrol in the wilds of the one-two-two. . . . Joe Pullane and 
George Lippi being tutored in Ed Barrett's sanctum by Lt. Seubert, 
with assistants Bill Foster and Henny Roth to lend a helping hand. 
. . . And what with the promotion e.Mam date announced, Rog 
Lucchese is biting his nails to the elbows while getting price quota- 
tions on chevrons AND clotheslines. . . . "WHO is this Gerard"'^, 
mutters Dan Carnevale, while Cicero only smiles benignly. . . . Matt 
Kurshals inadvertently wearing a pair of Size 14 shoes for three 
days before discovering his error. "No wonder they felt tight," 
says Matt. . . . Jim Kelly joins the happy hand of sergeants' 
drivers. . . . Welcome Sal Porco, back from sick report looking a 



— 36 — 



QUESTIONNAIRE 

Don't Forget — SPRING 3100 wants your answers 
to the QUESTIONNAIRE on page 29 of this issue. 



bit wan, but all the better for having lost some unnecessary weight. 
. . The SPRING 3100 box in the sitting room still an empty 
cavern. That's why you hear so little of Squads 5 to 10. Let's have 
some dirt. . . . We're getting schizo-something trying to keep up 
with Al Stuckert's mustache. . . . Tom Dunn, local elder gave young 
Richard Sanjour, 13, son of your reporter, quite an educational 
lecture on juvenile proprieties one frigid day on East 14th Street. 
Richard turned blue with cold by the time Tom finished his dis- 
course. . . . Sgt. Ahern looking around for a stray cat on the S. I. 
Perry.— Teo Best riding the same boat. . . . We extend our heart- 
felt sympathy and condolences to the bereaved families of Mike 
Rusinyak and Dan Walthers, both of whom lost dearly beloved 
parents; Michael, his father, and Dan, his mother. ... It was a 
distinct shock to every one of us to learn of Al Gillings' sudden 
and untimely death. Every man attached to the 8th Precinct was 
genuinely saddened, and to Al's grief-stricken young widow, his 
children, and the rest of his family, we offer our deepest sympathy 
in their irreparable loss. 

15th PRECINCT: MAN OF THE MONTH— Ptl. Sabatino 
Fusco & Sam Festa, while on RMP, chased and captured a man, 
who was breaking into parked cars on 41st Street near Madison 
Ave. The prisoner had a previous record of 19 arrests. . . . CON- 
DOLENCE: To Jim Maher on the death of his Dad. . . . EX- 
CLUSIVE : Frank O'Rourke, has captured tlie heart of one of the 
bigtovra's loveliest blonde models. Her intials are "DJ". The wedding 
is expected to take place on New Years Eve. . . . HALL OF 
FAME : Tom Swift and Andy McLauglin, who were cited in the 
recent General Orders for Excellent Police Duty. . . . HAPPY 
BIRTHDAY: To Captain Thomas Burns, Sgt. Bob O'Donnell, Al 
Brown, Bill Haywood Joe Haeffley, Frank Masci, Harry Morrissey, 
Hugh McKee, Tom McNamara Lou Palumbo, Ed. Schultz, Toe 
Steinwand and Joe Veyvoda. . . . DID YOU KNOW THAT: 
Carmine Pacifico, told Artie Keenan that there is no truth to the 
report that he is writing his autobiography. . . . The town is talking 
about the wonderful job the boys in the "ISth" did during the 
recent Air Raid Drill. . . . The Christmas Party, Tim Brady, our 
PAL patrolman threw for the kids in the neighborhood was a big 
success. . . . SPORTS CORNER: Tom Moher is always sur- 
rounded by a large crowd in the sitting room just before turn-out 
time when he lectures on "How To Improve Your Golf Game". 
Tom, constantly shoots in the low seventies and at these bull ses- 
sions we have noticed Marty Duffy, George Hiller and Jack Potter 
taking notes. ... SO PROUDLY WE HAIL : Sgt. Ed Donohue, 
who last month celebrated 40 years in the job. . . . The application 
forms for promotion to sergeant, went fast and it seems 
that everyone in the house is going to take the examination this 
time. We believe that the stafT of SPRING 3100, is doing a terrific 
job of publishing vital information for all concerned and so we 
suggest that you guard vour copy of this magazine well for past, 
present and future reference. . . . WE WISH FOR THE NEW 
YEAR THAT : Someone leaves Jack Potter an 18 hole golf course 
in his will. . . . Byron Schrock and Tim Ellsworth get a pennant 
winner in Brooklyn. . . . Jim Schramm grows a beard. . . . 
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO : All former members of this command 
in the job, retired members, those in the military service and last 
but not least the boys in blue of the "15th" 

22nd PRECINCT: Last year we batted -1000 in managing to 
have a column in each issue of our magazine and we hope to be 
able to duplicate the feat this year. Here we are ofT to a late, but 
we hope, good start. With the first snowfall of the year Central 
Park has turned into a veritable Winter wonderland. The trees lost 
their look of bareness as the snow set the scene for Christmas and 
the coming year. Pine Hill, Pilgrim's Hill, Burn's Lawn ; every 
hill in the park resounds to the happiness of the city-bred kids 
who love to romp and cavort in the clean newly-fallen snow, which 
reminds us of a curtain, as it falls silently, blanketing the town and 



hiding the dust, dirt and filth of the metropolis and creating the 
impression that the wonder of the change will stay with us forever. 
It would be nice if it could. In the evening, as the lamplight reflects 
the crystal beauty of the snow and the snow crunches underfoot 
one thinks, "This is really the 'Wanna make ya live weather — yeah, 
live in Florida ! !' " Recently one of our favorite desk officers, Lt. 
Becker became a pioneer in opening a new precinct and we refer to 
the 107th Precinct, Queens. Lt. Becker was with us for a little 
more than five years and during that period of time he proved him- 
self to be a man among men and a desk officer par excellence. A 
situation never arose where the Lieutenant didn't competently and 
capably discharge his duty. In his new endeavor, the Lt. is accom- 
panied by Patrolman Walter Maxwell who will be remembered 
by the command as the guy who dove into icy water in the mid- 
dle of the Winter on a bitter cold day to save the life 
of a little boy whose intrepidity exceeded his sense and 
who had fallen through the ice at the 100th Street pool. ... A 
delicate problem has arisen. In last month's column we, in speaking 
of one of our new fathers-to-be, mentioned the fact that he would 
soon be preparing formulas and walking the floor. Well, the power 
of the written word is truly apparent ! Why ? Well, we understand 
that his wife says, "Now looky here, it said right in that magazine 
that this is your job! So there!" Dear Reader: We suggest you 
comply with your wife's request and admittedly this is a quick 
answer to a difficult problem, but we don't believe in antagonizing 
those members of society on the distaff side. Never underestimate 
the power of a woman. Their ways are varied and strange and you 
wouldn't want the basket to be hung high, now would you? And 
speaking of neo-paters may we offer our sincerest congratulations 
to our own Little Eddie Martin whose wife, Helen, gave birth 
last month to a fine broth of a boy. Ditto to Mike Miano whose 
wife also gave birth to a boy. And may we add, Mike REALLY 
gave Coronas and was he happy ! Oh ! boy . . . you'd think that 
he had the baby ! Well, that's two more seegars that we add to our 
collection. Speaking of births, we feel that birthday greetings would 
be apropos at this point, so taking a cue, and W'ishing j-ou Hoppy 
Boifday, Sgt. Matty, (who is our Nemesis!), Ptls. John Bolger, 
Louis Braverman, Mike Caruso, Hank Guzowski, Joe Kleniewski, 
George Moran, Fred Nowicki, Arthur Plate, Jack Regan, Mike 
Santacroce, C. Sullivan, and that is the sum total of those members 
of the command who decided to get off to an early start! We 
wondered recently why it was so quiet around the precinct and then 
our friend L. Pohgnani asked if we had heard how Martin Curnan, 
pronounced Curnan, was enjoying his Canada-Florida vacation. We 
hope he's enjoying himself. We welcome to the command Sgt 
Redden, whom we are quite sure will enjoy his stay with us. And 
whadda you know, Joe Parisi finally made Mcy — A good guy whom 
(Continued on next page) 




^Aif 



37 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-fConHn„.</) 



we wish well. Visit us, Joe, because we're sure that M. Onianoff 
will be lonesome for you. Yes yes, Joe Morgan, Jack Connors and 
Artie Plate left via transfers and we hope that you will be happy 
in your new assignments. From the Academy we welcome I'rob. 
Ptls. Boy, Caflfrey, Crow, Devine, Flanncry, Gallagher, McElry and 
Reidy. If you men had been assigned here in the Spring we would 
have been able to strew roses in your path but right now you'll have 
to settle for snowballs! Welcome, men, to the best precinct in the 
city. Our good friend Lt. Jeremiah McCarthy has once again chal- 
lenged us to a game of handball and we know that we'll ha\e to 
dig up a ringer somewhere because the good Lt. can really belt that 
little old handball around. Us, we're strictly for spectator participa- 
tion. We figure we'll live longer tliat way. Well, >ou're right, we 
don't believe in spectator participation in EVERYTHING. Jack 
Regan and Harry Kiritz doing a bang-up job in tlie upper end and 
what's this we hear about Regan buying a new set of uniforms? 
Hmmm? Seen taking in the lower end of the Park on his day 
off and looking quite dapper indeed : Sgt. M. George Miller ac- 
companied by his lovely wife, Florence, whose looks certainly 
belie the size of her two sons. Why they're bigger than the old 
man and what's more they've got more hair! Mighty attractive 
family, yessirree ! Our commanding officer is certainly the personi- 
fication of sartorial splendor and let us tell you, we have seen few 
members of the diplomatic corps who look as well in a homburg 
as our captain ! Applications for the Sgt. exam are out and 
the boys wasted no time in snapping 'em up. We know that 
several of our boys will do well on the next exam and we put 
Dick Cronin, Charlie Fikar, Bill Clancy and Mike Lonergan up 
high. Sgt. Hunt's big problem is how many Lts. will be made. Jack 
will be made but whether to use the preference or not to use it. That 
is the problem. Whither goest tliou? Our thought for the month: 
While talking to an old-timer once an extremely well taken point 
was made. Our friend said that cops were always targets for 



Cop "Arrested" While Flying For Marines 



SEE PAGE 29 

Be sure to fill in your preferences for your magazine, 
SPRING 3100, and send them to the EDITOR OF SPRING 
3100, 400 Broome Street, New York City. 




When Patrolman E. H. P. Lynk of the 114th Precinct took a leave 
of absence from the department for a tour of active duty as a 
Marine Corps flying lieutenant, he no doubt thought that he 
was finished with arrests for a while. Assigned to a "Banshee" 
jet fighter squadron, he learned differently, however. Recently, 
while serving with the mighty Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean, 
Lieutenant Lynk had the distinction of making the 40,000th 
arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier FRANKLIN D. 
ROOSEVELT. The occasion was marked by appropriate cere- 
monies including a king-size cake turned out by the ship's galley. 
Photo shows Lieutenant Lynk (center) being congratulated by 
Commander Campbell (left), the carrier's executive officer, 
while Morine Sergeant Porter looks on. Lynk saw Navy and 
Marine service during World War II from 1943 to 1946. 



criticism and it hurt the good cops because of the bad that a few 
had done, but he said always remember, the Good Lord had 
twelve disciples and they weren't all faithful to Him. So, when you 
have 19,000 men you're bound to have a few that aren't FAITHFUL 
TO THEIR TRUST. Don't feel bad about them. Just you be 
good . . . not because you fear the consequences if you aren't good, 
but because you want to be good. That's the thing to do. The 
column extends to members of the command and the department 
warmest greetings and best wishes for a happy and pleasant New 
Year ! Until next month, men. Keep the Faith ! 

23rd PRECINCT: Before we go any further, let us all pray 

that the year 1932 brings only good health and prosperity to every- 
one in the department together with their families and friends. . . . 
With the impending Sgts. exam, the locker room sounds like a 
classroom at a local law school. Everyone is cramming but hard. 
Lots of luck, fellas. . . . Light Duty Squad — We had a visit from 
Tommy Brennan last month. Tom was looking fine. Not so with 
Patty Bohan who is undergoing another brain operation at St. 
Vincent Hospital. How about dropping him a card? Better still 
pay him a visit, I'm sure he'll appreciate either. . . . Our expert on 
Puerto Rican affairs, Pete Rodriguez, finally got himself hitched, 
and who else could be his best man but Les Sackett. Good luck and 
the best of everything Mr. and Mrs. Pete. . . . Those 
Ancient Mariners, Elliot and Stagliano, were called by radio 
to the foot of 90th Street and F.D.R. Drive one A.M. The 
signal 32 was for a boat in distress. Arriving at said place, they 
peered through the half-light looking for a boat of any kind. Not 
seeing even a piece of drift wood, they thought it a false alarm 
or practical joke when someone pointed out a funnel jutting out of 
the water at their feet. It turned out that the funnel was attached 
to the fishing boat, Ansonia, which sank in some mysterious manner, 
but it's not true that they were taking deep sea diving instructions. 
. . . Our heartfelt sympathy and condolences go to Lt. Palmer, 
Henry Keolon and Ptl. Franklin in their hour of bereavement. . . . 
Mescall made a smart arrest of a man holding up a gas station, 
and how about Sgt. Luhrs and Bob Dorney capturing a hoodlum, 
seconds after he shot and seriously wounded another man? . . . 
Signs of The Time — The R.M.P. cops in the precinct buying walking 
shoes. . . . The PAL collecting toys for the annual Christmas party 
for the neighborhood kids. . . . Wasylciow and Dracha bagged 
themselves a buck deer apiece, an eight point and six point 
respectively. Memo to Little Moose — If you try real hard, 
maybe they'll relent and you may taste venison this year 
yet. Sam Gable Rubenfeld, an expert, didn't bag any deer 
either. Moose. . . . Our ever smiling Joe Geraci was on "the 
Winner Take All" radio program recently, and copped all the 
prizes. Bernie Schoenbrun was — on the "Songs for Sale" television 
show, but his song — didn't win, even though it won a lot of praise 
from the panel of experts. Better luck next time, Bernie. . . . You 
men who don't eat on the late tours, take a lesson from London. 
He consumes a good sized bag of lunch on all his late tours, and 
there are lots of men, including yours truly, who would like to 
have Kenny's trim waistline. . . . Once again let me wish a good 
and a happy New Year to you and yours. 

25lh PRECINCT: As we look in retrospect over the many out- 
standing achievements of our lads during the past year, the highlight 
undoubtedly was the award in two consecutive months of the 
Journal ."Kmerican's Public Protector Award to members of this 
command, Lou Middlestorb for October and Joe Mahon for Novem- 
ber, with Sergeant Matthew Redden (who has now left us for 
greener fields) and his driver Johnnie Kellelier mcntiotied as 
runners-up. More important to them than the cash prize (who needs 
it, anyhow?) are the extra points to be used in the forthcoming 
examination for sergeant. And speaking of examinations we wonder 



— 38 



do other precincts have as many avid students as we, eagerly 
awaiting the big day. . . . 

The pleasure we derive from seeing good superiors move up via 
promotion is always tinged with regret at the prospect of losing 
them, referring of course to the brand new lieutenant's list. With 
Sgt. Pat Kelly's imminently scheduled retirement on December 
31st we'll soon be seeing new faces in R.M.P. 323. And speaking of 
new faces, a hearty welcome from all to the eight new recruits, 
Eckert, MacLannan, Mann, Martin, McBean, McGuire, Snyder, and 
Welsh ! . . . Gag of the Month. . . . The back room of the station 
house buzzed witli its usual activity just before the sergeant's routine 
roll call. Around the bulletin board one group was busily engaged 
copying the alarms from the teletype sheets, while another awaited 
a turn at the shoe shine machine. At a long table a game of domi- 
noes was in progress, occupying the attention of the players and 
various spectators, while some just sat around smoking a last ciga- 
rette before the command to fall in. Suddenly, through a lull in the 
hum of voices, Ollie Glass spoke up. "Look here," he remarked 
with mild surprise in his voice, "I thought I was the only Glass 
in this house. Who's this fellow Abbott Glass?" . . . Reminds us 
of the time some years back when a member of this command, 
since retired, left his post to cover a payroll escort at the Palace 
Theatre on Second Avenue. Long after he was due there, the 
manager of the theatre called asking the whereabouts of the 
patrolman. Another man was dispatched in his place, and the desk 
officer and the sergeant on the "boxes" began to wonder what had 
happened. Visions of the missing officer injured or in trouble flashed 
through their minds. Finally to their relief his familiar voice was 
heard over the telephone. "Where are you?" the sergeant 
gently inquired. "Why sarge", came the answer, "I'm at the Palace 
Theatre, but they don't want any escort here." A wild thought 
passed briefly through the sergeant's mind as he incredulously 
asked "What Palace Theatre?" And then it happened! "Why 
sarge," answered our hero, "THE Palace Theatre, Broadway and 
47th Street" ! ! ! 

And that, my friends, winds up our activity for the start of an- 
other year. To each and every member of this command goes your 
reporter's heartiest and good wishes for the best possible New Year, 
and his sincere thanks for the manv kindnesses shown him by you, 
and you, and you ! HAPPY NEW" YEAR ! ! ! ! 

28lh PRECINCT; The entire command extends its sympathy 
to Claude Cargill on the loss of his mother. . . . We were genuinely 
sorry to see Ray Gleason finally put in his papers. Ray was a 
familiar landmark in the Division Office, almost a legend — altho 
the story that when the building was erected in 1912 Ray was 
already sitting in his customary corner on the second floor had 
been proven grossly exaggerated ! We certainly wish him well in 
his retirement! . . . Our gallant comrades garnered twenty-one 
citations in the last Departmental Recognition orders — quite a 
tribute to the courage and prowess of our alert and stalwart consta- 
bles I Topping the list was Joe Hughes, who added two, a Com- 
mendation and an Excellent Police Duty ; and the list included 
Commendations to Sgt. Herb Milhauser, Pfl. Charlie Jones, Pat 
Fusci, Al Fondiler, Jim Costigan, Frank Torla, Ernie Zeh, Jim 
Worthy, retired Red Rooney and also two to Bob Stewart, now- 
Detective Bob! Meritorious Police Duty awards went to Walter 
Brady. Frank Ward, Jim Mullin, Ed Engel, Julie Rouge, Dan 
O'Reilly, Al Bostic, and John Fahey, (now of the 17th Pet.) . . . 
High on the list for future awards will be Sgt. Roy Hatem and 
Charlie Jones, who when informed of the holdup by an armed man 
of a cab driver, investigated so promptly and efficiently that they 
apprehended the thug in the very act of counting his haul I Armed 
though he was, and despite his pointing his loaded gun at them and 
even pulling the trigger, (which misfired, due, no doubt to the 
fact that Sgt. Hatem and Charlies go to Church regularly!) they 
overcame the robber and with a few well directed right crosses 
relieved liim of both his gun and his inclination to battle any 
further. . . . Also coming to the aid of a hackie were Carmelo 
Perconti, Bill O'Connor and George Murray. O'Connor and Mur- 
ray, riding radio motor patrol, and Perconti, off duty and en route 
to the station house, observed a staggering man who proved to be a 
cab driver, stabbed in the leg by his two fares who had tlien robbed 
him and escaped by entering two different buildings. Murray entered 
one building, and the other two officers went in the second building, 
and all encountered their quarries. Both were armed witli long knives 




What'd they do? Run it down? 

and put up considerable resistance before being overpowered and 
placed under arrest. ... A report emanating from Montreal, Canada, 
is currently being checked for authenticity. Report averred that a 
thoroughfare in that city previously called St. Catherine Street, 
has been changed by unanimous acclaim of the local innkeepers and 
pub owners, to "Riordan Costello Boulevard." Incidentally, we have 
it on good (?) authority that Jim Costello is arranging the dowry 
terms for the proposed marital merger between his client. Bill 
Riordan, and a nameless female gendarme. . . . What are the 
circumstances whereby Pat (Table d'hote) Fusci is being referred 
to as "Mr. 160?" . . . The accompanying snapshot shows the 8-point 
buck, weighing 160 pounds, encountered and apprehended in the 
scrub oaks section of Glen Spey, N. Y. on Thanksgiving Day, al- 
thoftigh not by the wrestling holds being exhibited. The mighty 
(Continued on next page) 



FORMER PAL MEMBER NOW MISSIONARY 
PRIEST IN AFRICA 

From far-off Africa comes word of a former PAL 
boy who played in the PAL harmonica band at the World's 
Fair. He is Father John M. Schiff of the Marj-knoU Order, 
now assigned to the Masonga Mission in Tanganyika Ter- 
ritory, British East Africa. The information was embodied 
in a letter received by Deputy Inspector William F. Maley, 
4th Division, from his daughter Sister Marie William, a 
Maryknoll Nun, also in Africa, to whoin he had sent some 
recreational equipinent. Sister Marie William's letter read 
in part : "Our new volley ball has been well used now. Dad. 
It has lots of bounce and the youngsters are thrilled with it. 
We gave Father Schiiif of the Mar)'knoll Order, assigned 
to the Masonga Mission, a bat and ball, and imagine my 
surpise to learn that Father Schiff is from the Bronx, New 
York, and was in the PAL harmonica band for seven years. 
The band used to play on the radio and was at the World's 
Fair. He didn't know of my connection with the Police De- 
partment until this box arrived. He said to tell you that one 
of the old PAL'ers turned out all right. You should hear 
him praise the PAL. He was ordained at Marj'knoll in 
1949, still plays his harmonica, and says many thanks for 
the bat and ball." 

The package sent by Deputy Inspector Maley contained 
various items of recreational equipment and weighed sev- 
enty pounds. Is was transported to British East Africa free 
of charge by the Farrell Line and was admitted without 
duty by the local customs officers there. 



— 39 



hunters include Ray Wieboldt, holding the deer astern, his brollicr 
John at the helm, and their uncle, Paul HorwcKo, center. Their 
part)' of 8 hunters bagged llirec well-antlered bucks in the first three 
hours of the hunting season, which is well below par for the course ! 
Bill Riordan, lunuing with Pat Fusci, Joe Basta and Al Tuzin, 
brought down his deer with a well-directed shot on the second day 
of their hunting. Bill didn't stay up in the woods long, though. He 
said he packed his bag and came right home when he saw an S-point 
deer driving a car with a hunter tied across the hood ! 

BRONX 

42nd PRECINCT: The 42nd Precinct, known throughout the 
city for its activity, efficient police work and heroism, now has taken 
another step towards keeping itself on the top. We have always 
known it to be a fact that there are few organizations, be they 
religious, political, labor or what have you, that have our o\v)i 
Police Department licked when it comes to esprit de corps, faithful- 
ness and brotherhood. . . . This became more evident on the morning 
of December 2nd, 1951 when the men of this command, both uni- 
formed and detectives, regardless of creed or religion, turned out 
en-masse for the Precinct's 6th Annual Holy Society Communion 
Mass and Breakfast. A total of 170 men were present including our 
honored guests. . . . After Mass, celebrated by Monsignor Szuhrinski 
at St. Adlebert's R. C. Church, we marched to the school hall and 
partook of a breakfast which was excellent and plentiful. Cigars 
and souvenirs followed and, then some unusually fine speeches. 
Charlie O'Connor did a wonderful job as M.C., and A.D.A. 
Wilfred Waltemade, D.I. James J. Dermody 3rd Div., D.I. Maurice 
Savage 13th Div., Ptl. Mario Biaggi, VP of the P.B.A. and of 
course our own CO., Capt. John Petrenchick all were outstanding 
on the dais. Other honored guests included Inspector Daniel Lake 
11th Div., D.I. Jones J.A.B., Lt. Robert Magnum J.A.B. No. 5, 
Ptl. John Achnitz President Holy Name Society of Bron.\, Manhat- 
tan and Richmond. 

For the excellent work in making our breakfast a success we 
wholeheartedly thank Capt. Petrenchick, Harold Wagner, Al Mc- 
Donald, Charlie O'Connor, and also to our very capable altar boys, 
George Cox and Al Lewis. Sgt. Milton Zarchin flew in from Wash- 
ington D. C. where he is currently serving with the U. S. Army as 
a Lt. Colonel. We were treated to some entertainment by six 
members of the police glee club led by Sgt. Dillon, and with Bill 
Diemer (Plug) acting as M.C. There was also a young cop who did 
a few solos, Jimmy Marley of the 44th Pet. My opinion, Jim, you're 
in the wrong job— another Mario Lanza. . . . Thanks to; Dick 
Carroll, now a civilian, who came up on his own to sing witli the 







St. Anselm's fife and drummers lead the 42nd Pet. turnout. 

(Inset) Msgr. Szubrinski is an interested listener as Captain John 

Petrenchick addresses the breakfast. 



glee club quartet; to the boys of St. Anselems' for the fife and drum 
escort; and to the men of the 46th Pet. for their delegation. We 
missed our very good friend ACI James McElroy, who due to 
illness was unable to make it. We sincerely wish him a speedy 
recovery. Thanks to Tom Moore of 2nd District Traffic for coming 
up on his own and rendering a couple of songs. Thanks to Arthur 
Speyer of 363 E. 161st for the swell photos. . . . Last month was a 
busy one for the boys and as usual we came up with a high score. 
Mark Francis and Thomas Leonard, Joe Rago and Jim Monaghan, 
Hugh O'Neill and Tom Dillon, Sgt. Soto and "Fresh Air" Mc- 
kenzie, Frank Taylor, and Bertie Nethersole, all performed out- 
standing feats in the line of duty. In the last set of orders, the 
men of the 42nd received more awards than any other single 
precinct throughout the city. . . . Eric Weidanz has ceased having 
palpitations of the heart now that the elections are over. . . . Seems 
he doesn't need Willie Fox's advice any more. . . . CongraPulalions 
to Captain Petrenchick's son, John, and his wife Audrey, married 
on November the 10th. . . . And to Fiore and Doris Latini who 
are proud parents of Joanne, 9 lbs. 3 oz. . . . imagine a little skinny 
guy like him; . . . Huh! 

Johnson swearing he will retire if Johnny Rice makes sergeant. 
. . . Dave Wcidcnbaum holder of ticket No. 1 for the Precinct 
Communion Breakfast ; Dick Corcoran, Fred Taylor, and the afore- 
mentioned John sweating the next sergeants appointments. . . . 
Barrett is recovering and is offering to give diving lessons come 
this summer. . . . Frank Taylor staying away from the roof tops 
and is allergic to hammers. Very recently six detectives of the 
42 Squad cornered a desperado in front of the station and served 
him with a summons for angle parking. ... So to all members of 
this command, my very sincerest wishes for a Happy New Year 
and the hope that the coming year will be even better than the last. 

43rd PRECINCT: How did Santa Claus treat you?? Yeah we 
gave- miirc than we got, too. . . . Congratulations to Sgt. Morris 
Gerwitz on becoming the proud father of a new son. . . . That 
recent exam for Traffic Officer of the Port of New York .Authority 
disclosed some interesting facts about their job; starting salary 
$58 a year more than N.Y.P.D., full equipment furnished free, com- 
plete winter uniform provided without cost, an animal allowance 
of $55 for repairs and maintainance of uniforms, group hospitaliza- 
tion and medical programs, a special life insurance plan, and a 
forty hour week!! ... On December 15th thirty two women traffic 
cops took over their new duties in the heart of New Orleans, 
Louisianna. Those swirling skirts on a breezy morning might 



40- 



wreak havoc with the traffic — If you know what we mean! 
... In a recent conversation we had with one of the ninety year 
old clam diggers of Classon Point we asked what he attributed his 
old age to. He explained that whenever he and his wife start to 
argue she would immediately go to the kitchen and he would go out 
doors. When asked what bearing that has had on his long life he 
answered, "Why I've been an outdoors man all my life!" . . . Our 
boys Pete Gragnola, Tony La Rocco, and Charley Lacina have 
their gold potsies now. Pete and Tony are in the 42 Squad, and 
Charley is in the 45 Squad. ... If you're wondering why Jimmy 
Satriano has been looking a little down in the dumps lately just ask 
us. It's a good reason, too ! . . . Bob Talbot and Ando bagged two 
burglars while your reporters made an arrest for burglars tools, 
larceny, and malicious mischief, (we have to fdl up space) . . . 
Charley Sibon is quickly mastering the trials and tribulations of the 
clerical man's job. (we are not banging ears) . . . We had a swell 
time on our fishing trip Nov. 29th. We'll see if we can run a few 
more in the Spring. Sgt. Ed Beiner and Frank Tooley tied for first 
with six each. Cy Jordan caught the biggest fish just beating Jack 
Haeser's catch by half an ounce. Those who ran out of the money 
were Lt. Tom O'Connell, Sgt. Jack Isaacson, Leonard Guenzburger, 
Hal Hartner, Katsch, Ray Keane, John McCarthy, Jack Osborne, 
Eddie Oswald, Tony Perrino, Charlie Schneider, Herb Weber, 
Volpato, and yours truly. (If you come next time you'll see your 
name in print too). ... In our WHO dept : WHO is the Sector 
3 cop in the 9th squad who put his pay check in a bureau drawer and 
forgot aborut it till the next pay day? WHO is known as the 
"green hornet" because of his long trip daily in a green Nash? 
WHO was seen shining his rubbers on the shoe machine? WHO was 
the guy who sent out a notification for Tommy Kirk to report 
early for T.S. duty? WHO flew 800 miles to the Holy Name 
convention in Detroit and wound up in the church of a different 
faith? . . . We heard from reliable sources that back in '33 in the 
48 Precinct Frank Marino was considered the precinct romeo. 
(believe it or not). . . . We were told Gene Connelley said, "I'm 
Irish and proud of it", while Andy Cockburn replied, "I'm Scotch 
and FOND of it! ... We'd like to take this opportunity to wish 
you all a HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!! . . . We all mourn the 
passing of Frank Albrecht, our clerical man for the past few years. 
Frank was well liked by all though he had a tough job to perform. 
We know we express the sentiments of all the members of our 
command in offering our sincere condolances to Frank's loved ones. 

44ih PRECINCT: GREETINGS FROM OUR CAPTAIN: 
"I am happy at this time to extend to members of this command 
and -their families my sincere greetings and best wishes for a 
Healthful and Happy New Year. Each and every member is assured 
of my appreciation for the splendid support given me since my 
coming to the 44th Precinct, and for the effective manner in which 
the functions of the Police Department have been carried out." . . . 
FROM YOUR REPORTER: In the spirit of the Christmas season, 
your reporter wishes to extend to all our contributors a note of 
sincere thanks for their graciousness in furnishing all those little 
items of interest for the column. Thanks to the Editor and his 
staff for the patience in editing our stuff and to our readers — 
particularly those who. when the occasion calls, take their ribbing 
in good spirits like the real sports they are. So to the members 
of this precinct and their families and friends a Happy New 
Year. . . . CONGRATULATIONS: To Ptl. Harold Cassel and 
missus upon the birth of their daughter. ("She's as sweet as the 
candy in Barton's.") . . . To Ptl. James Smith and his lovely wife 
upon the blessed event (a daughter). ... To Ptl. George LHmer 
upon his new assignment as FIRST BROOM. . . . THRU THE 
GRAPEVINE: It is rumored that Ptl. Frankie Mangan is going 
into Stock Car racing. (????) . . . WELCOME: To Lts. Hol- 
brook and Lyons upon entering our family circle, hoping your stay 
with us will be pleasant and healthful. ... I still can use some help, 
fellows, so let me have it thru the little black box on the w'all, 
marked "NEWS ITEMS." 



BROOKLYN 

61sl PRECmCT: On Nov. IS, 1951 the boys of the 61 gathered 
to eat, drink, and give handsome retirement gifts to Placanica, 




DO<4C«Ty-1l'| 



Ryan, Camperlingo, Norden and Jenkins. In addition to a good 
turn out by the present members of the command we had at least 
a dozen retired men down to enjoy the festivities. . . . The annual 
P.A.L. party took place at the Kingsway Theatre at 9 a.m. Dec. 
24, 1951. About 2000 children attended and had a big time. . . . Con- 
gratulations to the Shuberts on the birth of another son. . . . Good 
luck to De Masi who has recently retired. . . . Glad to hear Gilley 
has recovered from the injury he received. Hope our men who are 
at present ill will recover soon and rejoin us. . . . Jake took time 
off from his hectic preparations for the Christmas party to realize 
how old he is getting. His son Harvey will be confirmed soon. 

QUEENS 

102nd PRECINCT: Our sincerest condolences to Walt Ryan in 

the recent loss of his sister and to Henry Stamm in the loss of his 
father-in-law. ... A note of thanks received from \\'illie W'endt, 
in appreciation for the noble gesture on the part of the boys of 
the 102. Incidently, Willie, recently released from the hospital, is 
winning an uphill battle— We knew you could do it, Willie. I 
shall endeavor to look into that scotch diet of yours, must be 
something to it. . . . It has been said, "show me the company you 
keep and I shall tell you what you are." . . . Henry Stamm de- 
liberately cuts holes in his trouser pockets so that he doesn't have 
to carry money. . . . We bid adieu to Bimpson, via retirement, 
as of Nov. 30th. Best of luck in civies. ... Ed Stahl, off sick 
report and now on vacation, looking better than ever. Lost quite 
a bit of weight. His stomach now looks as if he got rid of 
three or four bowling balls. . . . Stanton detailed to Communications. 
. . . Sgt. Gribbon's nemesis, Tom Pauls, writes that the Sgt. gave him 
a big spiel on his intended home-cooked dinner of four baby lamb 
chops plus all the trimmings, and then when his tour was over, 
stopped in Trunz to purchase 15^ worth of bologna. . . . Babies 
are in the limelight once again. Angelo Maltagathi and Charlie 
Parsons announced the birth of sons on Nov. 3rd and 24th respec- 
tively. Hear ye, hear ye. Parsons has a baby boy (Charlie, now you 
cannot accuse us of not mentioning your name in Spring 3100) 
Mothers and sons doing fine— Congratulations to all. . . . Hey 
Tierney, no school crossing on Saturdays. . . . Roscher inquires, 
"Who is this new man, Manual, that I hear so much about?" . . . 
We miss Sgt. Connelly's cartoons in Spring 3100— Wha Hoppened? 

(Continued on page 43} 



41 



Amendments — Rules and Regulations 



Clip along lines; insert in appropriate place in book. 
Other amendments will be found on pages 44, 46, and 48. 



Rules 407 
and 408 



Poste over present 
Rule 407 and first 
part of Rule 408 at 
bottom of Page 165. 



Rules 408 (Cont.) 
and 408A. 



Past* over present 
fnotler at top of 
Peg* 166. 



Ro/e 19, Subd. e. 



Post* over present 
Subdivision e ol bot- 
tom of Pog* 16. 



407. A temporary assignuiciit, except to the 
Light Duty Squad, will continue only during 
such time as the services of a member of the 
force are actually required. Such temporary 
assignment, unless otherwise authorized, will 
not exceed thirty-one days, expiring automati- 
cally with respect to commands in the borough 
of Manhattan at 8 :00 a.m. on the first of each 
month and in other boroughs at 8 :00 a.m. on 
the sixteenth of each month. When the serv- 
ices of a member of the force temporarily as- 
signed are no longer required, the command- 
ing officer of the command to which such 
member is temporarily assigned, will discon- 
tinue the temporary assignment, direct the 
member to report to his regular command, 
notify such member's commanding officer, and 
forward a report of action taken to the Police 

Commissioner. (Amended 6-8S:, G.O. 25) 

408. An application for the renewal of a 
temporary assignment will be forwarded to 
the Police Commissioner, through official chan- 
nels, five days prior to the date of expiration. 

165 



408A-411 

Such application will show the date of original as- 
signment, the work accomplished by the member of 
the force during his previous assignment, and the 
necessity for the extension thereof. 
(Amended 6-8-51, G.O. 25) 

408A. The Chief Surgeon shall recommend the 
terriporary assignment or renewal of a temporary 
assignment of a member of the force to the Light 
Duty Squad for a half month period not exceeding 
si.xteen days, or for a month period not exceeding 
thirty-one days, according to the circumstances of 
the case. Such assignments will terminate at 8:00 
a.m. Recommendation for renewal of such an assign- 
ment will be made five days prior to the date of 
expiration. 

(Added 6-8-SI, G.O. 25) 



e. The Juvenile Aid Bureau is composed 
of a Central Office and District Units. The 
territorial jurisdiction of District Units shall 
be as outlined in the Manual of Procedure. 

(Amended 12-12-51, T.T.O. 30) 



226-228 

in any way exact prior consideration and pre- 
vent him from performing police duty. 

a. No meinber of the police force of the 
City of New York shall become a member of 
any labor union. 

(Subdivision a added 8-7-51, T.T.O. 24) 



Rule 50 revoked. 

(As per G.O. 32, 7 3-51) 



383. A commanding officer shall obtain all 
Police Department property issued for the use 
of a member of his command who resigns, re- 
tires or is dismissed, immediately at the time 
such resignation, retirement or dismissal 
becomes effective, except that during the 

152 



384-386 

30 day period immediately prior to retirement, 
if a member goes on vacation or other au- 
thorized leave of absence, such property will 
be obtained at the time the vacation or leave 
becomes effective. He shall also obtain all 
Police Department property issued for the use 
of a member of his command who dies. Such 
Police Department property shall be forwarded 
by the commanding officer to the Chief Clerk 
and a receipt obtained therefor. 

(Amended S-l"-51, G.O. 40) 



137. The Bureau of Policewomen shall be 
untier the command of a member of the force 
designated by the Police Commissioner. Such 
commanding officer shall be under the direct 
supervision of the Commanding Officer, Head- 
(luarters Division. 

(Amended 12-12.51. T.T.O. 30) 



Rule 225, Subd. 



Paste over portion 
of present Rule 225 
at top of Poge 94. 



Rule 50 



Paste over son^e por- 
tion of present rule 
at bottom of Poge 
32. 



Rule 383 



Paste over first part 
of Rule 383 ot bot- 
tom of Poge 152. 



Rule 383 (Coni.) 



Paste over balance 
of Rule 383 at top 
of Page 1S3 



Rule 137 



Paste over present 
Rule 137 on Page 63. 



REMEMBER 



Send in Your Questionnaire on Page 29 



— 42 — 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-fCon*inued; 



Those of you who missed the Hero Comics issue that Harold 
Neal appeared in can breathe easier. Neal's sons can be found on 
124th St. Most every afternoon, passing out free autographed 
copies. Jimmy Wolf says Harold has to get rid of a cellar full of 
the magazines in this manner, because city ordinances prevent him 
from charting a plane and scattering them over NYC. ... A 
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU AND YOURS. 



OTHER UNITS 

TRAFFIC G: May I take this opportunity to wish the staff of 
Spring 3100 a Happy New Y'ear. I trust that with the new year 
your reporter will be able to gather more news and forward it 
to you before each deadline. ... To the members of Traffic Pre- 
cinct "G" my very best wishes for a happy holiday season. Every- 
one of you men who comprise this command can well take a bow. 
It is a pleasure to be among you. The best to you and your families. 

MOUNTED SQUADRON NO. 1: This is your anonymous re- 
porter back once again with a few chosen words of wisdom, a tale 
or two about some of YOU and a little gossip you have tried to 
hide but this ever alert newshawk has ears all over. . . . First we 
must congratulate Urquhart and DiGiore who shot and wounded 
a Harlem hoodlum who attempted to shoot them, and Gittens, who, 
with the aid of his faithful steed, disarmed another gunman. May 
you wear tliose commendation bars with pride, gentlemen. . . . We 
all wish a speedy and complete recovery to Bill Rivello who is 
recuperating at the Beekman Downtown Hospital. Although seriously 
injured, Bill is permitted visitors, so don't hesitate to stop and say 
hello. . . . November was a tough month this year with W'ills, 
Gordon, Hunt and Holm joining the ranks of those injured. A 
rapid recovery is our wish for you lads, and hope to see you back 
in the saddle again. . . . Whether or not we lose our veterans by 
law is as yet unknown at this writing, but the day our own Johnny 
Reilly hangs up his uniform "The Finest" shall have lost one of 
its Finest. . . . We bid goodbye and extend good luck to D. Miner- 
vini, Ed Hughes and J. MacCauley on their assignment to the De- 
tective Division. . . . Stop in and say hello to us when time permits, 
for with all our horse sense we may have a few tips for you. . . . 
Once again, when called upon, the mounted men performed notably 
on the waterfront. . . . Although the tours were long and the weath- 
er bad we all wound up smiling. . . . Wonder how the rooks enjoyed 
the ride from 128th Street. . . . Seems like old times when we 
rode from Varick St. to the Polo Grounds and then did 8 hours 
on 48th Street or Harlem on Sundays. . . . How come O'Brien is 
now reading the Times? . . . Filby was observed scanning the Fire 
eligible list. . . . Fagan still says "Yes Sir" to Umberto. . . . 
Potente prefers Schwartz. . . McDonald keeps counting to 288 and 
its not sheep. ... Is it true j'our daughter is going to join the WAC, 
John? . . What happened in Queens with so many retirements? . . . 
All the home owners are looking to fill the vacancies. ... To each 
and every member of this command and their families I take this 
opportunity to wish you all a healthy, happy and wholesome New 
Year. To all of you retired men our wishes for the best of every- 
thing to you and may God bless you all for a job well done. . . . 

POLICEWOMEN'S BUREAU: WVre off! (But don't tell any- 
one!) . . . Ruth Steindel's bundle of joy arrived November 17th. 
The dapper diaper-wearer is a fine boy named Charles. Director 
Peters' bundle of joy, a Christmas present from her hubby, wears 
a turtle neck sweater with an air-conditioned hemline. (This is a 
boxer puppy, complete with super dooper pedigree, aged 3 months, and 
named Suzy Q. — maybe, if the A.K.C. agrees.) . . . That order 
about members of the department not receiving Christmas gifts 
was hard on many of our girls . . . nobody outside of their families 
offered them anything ... so how could they be noble and refuse? 
. . . Ha ! . . . Mink. . . . That's a weasel with a college degree. 
. . . D.S.P. — Darn Steep Price. . . . Get well wishes to Cath- 
erine "Robbie" Robinson, who had a slice job and is re- 
couping in Methodist Episcopal Hospital in Brooklyn. . . . They 
thought she had a floating kidney (from drinking WATER . . . 
let that be a lesson to you ! ) but when they operated they did a 



carbon and valve job! Speedy recovery wishes also go to Mae 
O'Neill, Eileen Hanast and Betty Fuller. . . . Speaking of health, 
the Police Department Blood Bank is overdrawn, and members of 
the force are urged to give blood, if they can, to get the account 
solvent again. This blood is for members of the force and their 
immediate families, so let's get behind the program and show what 
we can do. . . . Felicia Shpritzer on vacation cruise to Panama. . . . 
good hunting, kid ! That P.E.A. Tea on November 14th was a big 
success. There were 150 members and guests, the room at the Penn- 
Top of the Statler was lovely, the arrangements perfect, and every- 
one had a wonderful time. Guests included Mrs. Impellitteri, Mrs. 
Thomas Murphy, Mrs. Martin Meaney, Mrs. Frank Doyle, Mrs. 
John Jones, Mrs. Bernard Uiflot, and of course Irene Peters and 
Ann Fenety. Also the God-father of all policewomen, Dave Salter, 
Councilwoman Bertha Schwartz, Corporation Counsellor Angela 
Parisi and our friends Jack Cohen, alias Jack Roberts, alias Jack 
Cavanaugh (Anyway, he's the lad who plays at Dave's favorite 
hangout) and Johnny Concannon (He's V.P. of the Honor Legion) 
and Marty Keane — that popular star of radio, television and police 
affairs . . . also one of the Keane twins who gets double value 
from some kind of whiskey chiefly by not drinking. The door 
prize, donated by Ann Fenety, was won by Mrs. Frank Doyle. . . . 
(Isn't that good Public Relations stuff ?— Really, it was all on the 
level.) Clara Johnston aided and abetted by Marie Rynne and 
Marion Falloon handled the details of the tea and have since been 
heaped with deserved praise. (I'll buy you girls new hats if this 
keeps up!) . . . Big news last month was graduation of 47 new 
policewomen from the Police Academy on December tenth. Honor 
Girl was Mary Mclnnis . . . who when asked what she intended to 
do with the prize gun said, "Learn to shoot it." The addition of 
these girls enabled another important chunk of news to come about — 
girls who have been working in J..\.B. for years have now been 
permanently assigned there, 28 of them . . . And for the first time, 
24 girls have been permanently assigned to various divisions and 
borough offices. Four of the new girls went to J.A.B., eight to 
special assignments, and the rest to the Policewomen's Bureau. 
This whole policy represents a great new opportunity for police- 
women in general, and to all the girls go good wishes for success 
in the new assignments, both for the personal satisfaction of each 
one, and for the good they can do for all policewomen by making 
good on the job. . . . P.E.A. elected officers for the year of 1952, 
(Continued on page 45) 




But I DID search him, Lieutenant! 



43 — 



Amendments — Rules and Regulations 



Rule 19, Subd. a 



Pasta over present 
kubd. a of Rule 19 
on Pag* 13. 



Rule 19, Subd, a 
(Conf.) and b 



Poste over present 
Rule 19 as contained 
on Page 14. 



Rule 19, Subd. b 
(Conf.) 



Poft* over present 
niotter of top of 
Page 15. 



Clip along lines; insert in appropriate place in book. 
Other amendments will be found on pages 42, 46, ond 48 



a. The patrol force is organized into 
Borough Headquarters Commands as fol- 
lows : 

Borough Headquarters Manhattan West 



13 



19 



Borough Headquarters Manhattan East 
Borough Headquarters Bronx 
Borough Headquarters Queens 
Borough Headquarters Brooklyn West 
Borough Headquarters Brooklyn East 
Borough Headquarters Richmond 

The territory within a borough headquarters 
command is divided into divisions. The ter- 
ritory within a division is divided into pre- 
cincts. The territory' within a precinct, for 
purpose of patrol, is divided into sectors and 
posts. The territorial jurisdiction of each 
command shall be as outlined in the Manual 
of Procedure. 

(Amended MO-50, T.T.O. 2; 12-27-50, T.T.O. 28; 
2-20-51, CO. 9; and I0-20-51, T.T.O. 28, later con- 
firmed by G.O. 57, 10-30-51) 

b. The Detective Division is composed 
of Central Office Bureaus and Squads and 
Statistical and Criminal Identification Bu- 
reaus maintained at Police Headquarters, 
together with Detective Bureau Borough 
Headquarters Commands as follows : 

Detective Bureau Borough Headquar- 
ters Manhattan West 



14 



19 



Detective Bureau Borough Headquar- 
ters Manhattan East 
Detective Bureau Borough Headfjuar- 

ters Bronx 
Detective Bureau Borough Headquar- 
ters Queens 
Detective Bureau Borough Headquar- 
ters Brooklyn West 
Detective Bureau Borough Headquar- 
ters Brooklyn East 
• Detective Bureau Borough Headquar- 
ters Richmond 
The territorial jurisdiction within the 
Detective Bureau Borough Headquarters 
Bronx, Queens and Richmond shall be bor- 
ough wide. The territorial jurisdiction of 
Detective Bureau Borough Headquarters 
Manhattan West, Manhattan East, Brook- 
lyn West and Brooklyn East shall be as 
outlined in the Manual of Procedure. De- 
tective districts and detective squads shall 
have territorial jurisdiction co-extensive 
with patrol divisions and precincts respec- 
ively. 

(.Amended 2-20-5I. G.O. 9; 521. 31. T.T.O. 15; and 
10-200 1, T.T.O. 28. later confirmed by CO. 57. 10- 



343-347 

343. In all accident cases where persons 
have been killed or seriously injured and are 
likely to die, if the accident was caused by a 
motor vehicle, members of the force shall de- 
tain the vehicle and request that a ciualified 
member of the Homicide Squad be assigned to 
examine and test the mechanism of vehicle 
converned. 

(Amended 8-21-51, G.O. 41) 

344. When an arrest is made as the result 
of an accident caused by a motor vehicle, and 
it is apparent the accident was caused by a de- 
fect in mechanism, the member of the force 
who makes the arrest shall detain the vehicle 
and cause an examination to be made by a 
qualified member of the Homicide Squad. 

(Amended 8-21-51, G.O. 41) 

345. If, in any case, after an examination 
by a qualified member of the Homicide Squad, 
it is found that no defect in the mechanism 
exists, the vehicle shall be delivered forthwith 
to the owner; otherwise members of the force 
shall take possession of, and hold it as evidence. 

(.Amended 8-21-51, G.O. 41) 



25. The order of rank in the Police Force 
shall be as follows : 
Chief Inspector 
Chief of Detectives 

Assistant Chief Inspector-Chief of Staff 
Supervising Assistant Chief Inspector 
Assistant Chief Inspector 
Deputy Chief Inspector 
Inspector 
Deputy Inspector 
Captain 
Lieutenant 
Sergeant 
i Patrolman 
I Policewoman 



(Amended 12-29-50, 
38; 1-21-51, T.T.O. li 
9-27-51, G.O. 51) 



G.O. 
and 



43. A deputy inspector assigned to a division office 
shall have iminediale cliarge and control ol ihc mem- 
hers of the force assigned to duty in i>lainclothes in 
the division ofiice and shall be specifically charged 
witli and responsible for the enforcement of the laws 
relating to public morals, gambling and intoxicating 
liquors and the rules of the State Liquor .Authority 
and the New York City .Alcoholic Beverage Control 
Board, under the direct spervision of the division 
coniinander. 

(Amended 10-20-51, T.T.O. 27, later confirmed by 
(;.0. 57, 10-3051) 



Rule -14 revoked. 

(As per T.T.O. 27, 
57, 10-30-51) 



10-20-51. later confirmed by G.O. 



Rules 343, 344 
and 345 



Paste over present 
rules at top of Poge 
141. 



Rule 25 



Paste over present 
Rule 25 on Page 21. 



Rule 43 



Paste over present 
Rule 43 on Page 30 



Rule 44 



Paste over some por- 
tion of Rule 44 on 
Poge 30. 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-rconf,nued; 



so here's the Hne-up of who will be representing you. ... As presi- 
dent, Theresa Scagnelli; Vice-President, me — Adelaide Knowles; 
Recording Sec'y, Virginia Howard; Corresponding Sec'y, Stephanie 
Horvath ; Treasurer, Morrie Baer ; Sgt.-at-Arms, Felicia Shprilzer ; 
Legislative Chairman, Helen Sullivan; Research Chairman, Grace 
Kuhls; Grievance Chairman, Rosemary Patrissi ; Membership Chair- 
man, Lee Schuchardt. Well, Kids, that's enough for now. . . . I'm 
off to get the jump on the hunting. . . . Leap Year, you know . . . 
good hunting to all youse gals . . . after me, of course. Eyestrain? 
. . . see your optometrist to-day. — Yipes . . . and I thought I 
wouldn't have much to put in the "Col-yum" ! 

DIVISION OF LICENSES: A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO 
EVERYONE!! We hope this coming year will bring much hap- 
piness, health and SALARY INCREASES to all of us! ! . . . 
We wish to congratulate the Editor and his competent staff for the 
wonderful job they have done with our SPRING 3100 Magazine. 
Through their untiring efforts they have truly made a FINE 
magazine for NEW YORK'S FINEST!! We wish them continued 
success in the coming year ! ! . . . We all make New Year's resolu- 
tions, and then forget to keep them. Here are a few we ought to 
try to keep I Maybe if we did, this world would be relieved of some 
of its suffering. ALWAYS TRY TO MAKE OTHERS HAPPY 
— BE GENTLE AND KIND AT ALL TIMES — TRY TO 
REMEMBER THAT WE ALL HAVE OUR SHARE OF 
TROUBLES — DON'T CONDEMN YOUR FELLOW-MEN — 
PEACE ON EARTH — GOOD WILL TO ALL — A^O MATTER 
WHAT THEIR RACE OR CREED. ... We hope the New Year 
will bring a speedy recovery to Sgt. Millon and Ptl. Tommy McNa- 
mara who are still on sick report. . . Our sincere sympathy to Ptl. 
Joe Mazzone in the loss of his dear brother, a retired member — Also 
to Ptl. Johnny Egan in the loss of his dear father. Losing our loved 
ones is always on ordeal, especially during the holiday season. But, 
sorrow, grief and woes are sent into our lives, to help our souls 
to grow. . . . The stork was very busy delivering Christmas 
packages ! He delivered a bouncing boy to Ptl. Vince Tif- 
fany, and Civ. Irving Bergerman, who already have little girls, 
and to Ptl. Lou Cerrutti, he brought a nice little girl. Lou, you 
know, is our song-writing cop who wrote some beautiful songs 
before he got married I Maybe now that he's become a Papa, we 
may have a nice lullaby soon. Best wishes and congratulations to 
our new fathers. . . . Congratulations also to three swell Sgts. who 
hit the Lt's. list high in this order; Andy Leddy, Bill Loures, and 
Danny Holland. And they have no worry about the 63 year bill, 
'cause they're still young fella's ! ! . . . Frank DeVoy, one of our 
waterfront squad men has joined the ranks of civilians. Happy 
retirement, Frank, and may you enjoy a long and healthy life as a 
civilian. . . . Tel. Opr. Johnny Ashe, who was drafted for the 
Korean "POLICE ACTION", has been sent to St. Alban's Naval 
Hospital for a serious operation. We wish him success in the opera- 
tion and hope he returns to us soon. Good Luck, Johnny. . . . Too 




bad I don't have a picture of one of the most beautiful brides, the 
lovely daughter of Lt. Johnny Muchow, who was married last month. 
The wedding reception was held at the St. George Hotel, and 
people are still talking about it. A happy life to the bride and groom, 
and also to Lt. Papa and his lovely wife. . . . Lt. Touwsma's grand- 
son, Johnny Touwsma, received a $25 award in the semi-finals of 
the Mirror Beauty Child Contest. He is also entered in the finals, 
and we hope he wins. Nice goin' eh? . . . Our building is having 
it's face lifted, what with a paint job, new offices, new switch-board 
AND a new assistant for me. I now have Helen Hazel, formerly 
of the Chief Clerk's Office, assisting me with my busy chores. We 
welcome Helen, and hope she'll be happy with us. Sorry, Chief 
Finn, but your loss is our gain! We thank you! ! . . . This is a 
picture of some of our GAY BLADES taken at the Installation 
Dinner of American Legion Post 460. You'll notice that the ones 
who have their better halves with them are not so GAY. The only 
reason Frank Hartnett is smiling is because that hat he's wearing 
was tickling his ears ! Reading clock-wise from bottom of photo 
we have : Lt. and Mrs. Bill Touwsma : Ptl. Frank and Mary Hart- 
nett; Ptl. Charlie and Mrs. Feldscher, Mrs. Jennings with 
(SMILEY??) Jack, (who looks like he needs "THE THING";) 
Ptl. Tom Leech and Bill Stapleton. 



Division of Licenses' corner at American Legion Post 460's 
installation dinner. 



Irish Athletes Praise 
Police Guide 

On the recent occasion of the visit to New York by the 
football team of Meath County, Eire, the group's guide and 
escort was Lieutenant Michael J. McDermott of the JAB. 
The following excerpt of a story which appeared in the 
Irish newspaper, The Meath Herald, tells in unmistakable 
fashion of the glowing impression that the athletes took 
home with them of Lieutenant McDermott and the New 
York City Police Department. The Reverend P. Tully, C.C, 
Moynalty, Chairman of the Meath County Board of the 
Gaelic Athletic Association, who accompanied the group to 
New York contacted the Meath Herald on his return home. 
Here is the paper's story of his report : 

"Father Tully told us that Lieutenant Michael McDer- 
mott is Public Relations Officer of the New York Police 
Athletic League and was responsible for arranging trans- 
port accommodation for the visitors on such occasions as 
the reception at the City Hall and Central Park ; the visits 
to St. Patrick's Cathedral, the Polo Grounds, Belmont Park 
and the cruise round Manhattan Island. 'A more efficient 
man than Lieutenant McDermott we could not hope to 
meet,' said Father Tully, who went on to observe 'As a 
guide, his method of description was just what we wanted. 
As we rode on the coach through the busiest streets, his 
talks on historical, geographical, legal, administrative and 
sporting topics were so lucid, so much to the point, and 
so instructive in a simple way, that we made sure not to 
lose a word from him. He won our hearts completely by his 
inodest, gentle, unobtrusive manner at all times. Above all 
he personified the great virtue of patience, so necessary in 
dealing with a bunch of forty-eight hurlers and footballers. 
He was the first man ready on all occasions and, always, he 
had to wait for the last.' " 

"Father Tully went on to say: 'Lieutenant McDermott 
is a native of Lanesboro, County Longford, where his 
mother still resides at the grand old age of 92 years. To her, 
we want to say : Your son, Michael, is a credit to you and 
your family, to Lanesboro and to Ireland. May God re- 
ward you and him for all the good he has done and all 
the happiness he has brought to those who have had the 
privilege of meeting him.' " 



■45- 



Amendments — Rules and Regulations 



Clip along lines; insert in appropriate place in book. 
Other amendments will be found on pages 42, 44 ond 48. 



Rule 360 



Paste ov«r the por- 
tion of present rule 
OS oppeort on top of 
Poge 146. 



Rule 34, Subd. d. 



Poste over present 
subd. d' on Page 27. 



Rule 400 



Postc over present 
oKiterial ot bottom 
of Po9« 162 



Rule 239 



Pasle 


over 


present 


Rule 


239 


on Poge 


102. 







361-362 

demeanors, shall be taken without unnecessary 
delay to the precinct detective office for the 
purpose of identification. All such persons 
who have been arrested, and are still in cus- 
tody of the police, shall be delivered to the 
Detective Division, Police Headquarters, Man- 
hattan, not later than 8 A.M., the next day. 
At the same time and place shall be delivered 
a copy of the arrest entry concerning such 
prisoner, if arrested by other than a member 
of the Detective Division. If any such pri- 
soner is bailed, the Main Desk, Detective Divi- 
sion, will be notified by telephone. 

(Amended 5-1-50, T.T.O. 12 and 5-15-51, T.T.O. 15) 

d. On the first of each month, patrol divi- 
sion commanders will forward a report to 
the Chief Inspector, through official chan- 
nels, of the places and premises within their 
respective divisions in which patrolmen have 
been so assigned, with their recommendation 
regarding the continuance of such assign- 
ment and the reasons therefor. A copy of 
this report shall be filed in each command 
concerned. The borough headquarters com- 
mander concerned will forward the original 
copy to the Chief Inspector with recom- 
mendation. 

(Amended 6-8-51, G.O. 25) 

400. When a civilian employee is injured 
while on duty, and the case is such that emer- 
gency treatment is required, an ambulance shall 
be summoned, and in addition to any other 
action required, the civilian employee shall : 
a. Immediateely report all such in- 
juries, whether emergency treatment was 
received or not, to his commanding officer 
or supervisory head, giving the following 
information : 

1. Employee's name and title, 

2. Date, time, place and nature of 
occurrence, 

3. Names and addresses of witnesses, 

4. Name of doctor or attendant and 
hospital from which ambulance re- 
sponded, 

162 

239. A commanding officer shall obtain all 
revolvers and pistols in the possession of a 
member of his command who resigns, retires, 
or is dismissed, immediately at the time such 
resignation, retirement, or dismissal becomes 
effective, except that during the 30 day period 
immediately prior to retirement, if a member 
goes on vacation or other authorized leave of 
absence, his revolvers will be obtained at the 
time such vacation or leave becomes effective. 
He shall also obtain all revolvers and pistols 
among the effects of a member of his com- 
mand who dies. Commanding officers shall be 
responsible that these revolvers and pistols 
are properly safeguarded and promptly in- 
voiced to the Property Clerk. 

(Amended 8-I7-51, G.O. 40) 

102 



174-178 



GENERAL 



174. When assigned to perform the duties of an- 
otlier rank, a member of the force shall be governed 
by the regulations and orders affecting that rank. 

175. A tneniber of the force shall be fit for, and 
subject to, duty at all times, except when on sick 
report. He shall devote his entire time and attention 
to the service of the department, and shall not engage 
in any other business or calling, except that when sus- 
pended from duty without pay, he may engage tem- 
porarily in another business or calhng. In addition, 
a member of the force who has filed his application 
for retirement may, during the 30 day period imme- 
diately prior to the effective date of the retirement, 
engage in another business, occupation or calling pro- 
vided he is on vacation or other authorized leave of 
absence during that period. 

(Amended 6-14-51, T.T.O. 17) 



285. Sergeants and patrolmen on patrol in 
uniform shall be equipped with the following: 

a. Memorandum book 

b. Indelible pencil or fountain pen 

c. Baton or billet 

d. Holster with belt 

e. Revolver, fully loaded 

f. Not less than 12 extra cartridges 

g. Police whistle 
h. Nippers 

i. Book of personal white summonses 
k. Traffic Regulations of the Commis- 
sioner of Traffic 
1. Printed Posts List 
m. Serviceable flashlight (on tours 4 

P.M. to 8 A.M.) 
n. Traffic whistle (traffic patrolmen) 
o. Key to traffic light (traffic patrolmen) 

(Amended 8-21- 51, T.T.O. 26) 



401-403 

or if removed to a hospital, the 
name of attending doctor and hos- 
pital. 
5. Whether reporting sick or remain- 
ing on duty, 
b. If treatment of injury is neces- 
sary thereafter, consult his own doctor. 

(Amended 7-23-51, G.O. 36) 

401. The commanding officer or supervisor)' 
head shall, without delay, notify the Chief 
Clerk, by telephone, giving the above informa- 
tion, and shall confirm such notification by 
a written report on form U.F. 49, including 
therein such other pertinent facts as may be 
ascertained. Such coninianding officer or su- 
pervisory head shall also notify the Chief 
Clerk by telephone of the return to duty of 
an employee who reported sick at the time of 
occurrence and each additional time such em- 
ployee reports sick and returns to duty there- 
from due to sustaining these injuries. 

/ t l-J .T 1? r 1 



Rule 175 



Paste over tfie upper 
port of Page 79 to 
cover space from top 
of page to end of 
present Rule 175. 



Rule 285 



Paste over 
Rule 285 o 

120. 



present 
I Poge 



Rule 400 (Cont.) 
and 401 



Paste over balance 
of present Rule 400 
and all of Rule 401 
at top of Page 163. 



/ 



Tg^^lS 



Nome 

PtI. Charles F. A. Lynch 
PtI. John J. Conklin 



Appointed 

Jan. 10, 1921 



Command 



Died 



y\i IN SERVICE 

Comir 

18th Pet. Nov. 17, 1951 

Sept. 7, 1927 5th Pet Nov. 22, 1951 

PtI. Francis T. Moroney Feb. 17, 1939 Traf. B Nov. 24, 1951 

PtI. John D. Paar Mar. 6, 1925 E.S.D. Nov. 27, 1951 

PtI. John W. Boyce Oct. 19, 1925 Traf. A Dee. 7, 1951 

PtI. John C. Biedlnger Jan. 10, 1927 106th Pet. Dec. 11, 1951 

PtI. Arthur J. Nealon Feb. 1, 1947 M.S.B. Oct. 26, 1951 

RETIRED 

D.C.I. Archibald H. McNeil! June 8, 1901 Boro. Hq. Bklyn-Rich Dec. 2, 1951 

Copt. Daniel A. Kerr Aug. 27, 1895 Old 19th Div Nov. 15, 1951 

Lt. Arthur B. Gloster Dec. 8, 1896 Old 31st Pet Nov. 15, 1951 

Lt. James A. Cooper Oct. 2, 1893 Old Tel. Bur Nov. 15, 1951 

Lt. Michael J. A. Gleeson June 8, 1901 Old Tel. Bur Nov. 22, 1951 

Lt. Alfred Bernard May 11, 1904 Mcy. Dist. Nov. 27, 1951 

Lt. John E. McAdams Jan. 21, 1897 108th Pet Dec. 5, 1951 

Sgt. George L. McGovern Feb. 5, 1912 50th Pet. Dec. 11, 1951 

PtI. Harry W. Edwards Apr. 30, 1907 72nd Pet Nov. 7, 1951 

PtI. Alfred J. Lehman Apr. 1, 1908 50th Pet Nov. 15, 1951 

PtI. Walter E. Sharland Apr. 1, 1908 19th Div. Nov. 17, 1951 

PtI. Charles H. Arend Apr. 11, 1910 Traf. P Nov. 21, 1951 

PtI. Martin O'Connor June 4, 1915 103rd Pet Nov. 24, 1951 

PtI. Ralph H. Zengen Feb. 20, 1928 Det. Div. Nov. 23, 1951 

PtI. Thomas Mozzone Feb. 20, 1928 45th Pet Nov. 26, 1951 

PtI. Charles F. Thomsen Sept. 10, 1895 4th Pet Nov. 27, 1951 

PtI. Caspar Glaubiak Sept. 25, 1930 20th Pet Nov. 16, 1951 

Ptl. Joseph H. O'Connell Mar. 21, 1900 Traf. B Nov. 28, 1951 

PtI. John F. Wetzel May 29, 1905 40th Pet Nov. 30, 1951 

Ptl. Luke F. McDermott Aug. 7, 1907 Det. Div. Nov. 29, 1951 

Ptl. William Hogan Feb. 23, 1905 Old Marine Div Nov. 30, 1951 

Ptl. Anthony N. Saverino June 24, 1927 110th Pet. Dec. 4, 1951 

Ptl. Martin P. Dov/ling May 24, 1911 112th Pet Dec. 3, 1951 

Ptl. William M. Ward Jan. 17, 1927 Mey. Pet. 2 Dec. 3, 1951 

Ptl. Frederick P. Boer June 18, 1912 104th Pet Dee. 6, 1951 

Ptl. Raymond Hoppenstedt Aug. 27, 1925 105th Pet Dec. 10, 1951 



— 47- 



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WANTED BY THIS DEPARTMENT 



ASSAULT AND ROBBERY 




PHOTO TAKEN 1931 
Age 29 



WILLIAM SUTTON 

Alias Julian Loring, George Holland, Richard 
Courtney, Richard Loring and Edward Lynch. 

Age, 49 years; height, 5 feet, 8'/2 inches; weight, 150 
pounds; blue eyes; medium chestnut hair; fair complexion; 
medium build. 

Wanted for the robbery of branch office. Manufactur- 
er's Trust Company, Long Island City, Queens on March 
9, 1950. He has been indicted and bench warrant has 
been issued. 

Sutton is considered by veteran law enforcement of- 
ficers to be without peer in the underworld as a conceiver 
and user of disguises to perpetrate crimes. He has 
seemed to specialize in bank robbery and has, in the past, 
gained entry to premises, outside of business hours, by 
posing as police officer. Western Union messenger and 
mailman. 

He escaped from Sing Sing Prison in 1932 and from 
Eastern State Penitentiary in Pennsylvania in 1947, for 
both of which escapes he is also wanted. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 46 



$26,000 REWARD -WORLD'S FAIR BOMB EXPLOSION 



The Board of Estimate of the City of New York unanimously 
voted to appropriate $25,000 reward and the Detectives' Endowment 
Association of the Police Department, City of New York, has voted 
$1,000 reward for the apprehension, or for information leading to 
the apprehension and conviction of the individual or individuals, or 
organizations, that placed, or had any connection with placing, an 
infernal machine or bomb in the British Pavilion at the World's Fair, 
which, after being carried from the Pavilion to a vacant part of the 
Fair Grounds by members of this Department, exploded on Thursday, 
July 4, 1940, at about 4:40 p.m., causing the death of two detectives 
and injuries to other detectives. 



All information and the identity of persons furnishing it will 
be kept strictly confidential, and if the informant is not required as 
an essential witness and he so desires, the source of the information 
will not be disclosed. 

Persons having information should communicate in person or by 
telephone with Chief of Detectives' Office, Police Headquarters, 
Manhattan, 240 Centre Street, Telephone CAnal 6-2000. 

If more than one person is entitled to the reward, it will be pro- 
portionately distributed, and the Police Commissioner shall be the 
sole judge as to its distribution. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1940 
Age 22 



Homicide 

John GuistO — White; age 3i years; lieight, 5 
teet, 8 inches; weight 170 pounds; blue eyes; 
brown hair; wanted for homicide of Wil- 
liam Lurje, who was stabbed to death on Tune 
21, 1949 at 224 W. 3Sth Street, N.Y.C. He has 
been indicted by New York County Grand Jury 
and a bench warrant has been issued. Accomp- 
lice in this crime, Benedict M.acri, surrendered 
to authorities on June 18, 1950. A $25,000.00 
reward has been otTered by the International 
Ladies' Garment Workers Union for tlie arrest 
and conviction of the killers of William Lurve. 



Homicide and Felonious Assault 

Salverio Lopes Lagoeiro — alios Solverio 
Lopes Da Silvo — Age 55 years; height 5 feet, 
1 1 5 2 inches ; weight 190 pounds ; dark brown 
eyes and hair ; dark complexion ; scar under- 
neath chin; pit mark over left eye; a Portu- 
guese ; occupation, a longshoreman ; He is 
wanted for the shooting and killing of Joseph 
J. Serria, and shooting and wounding Felix 
Longo on board a barge at Pier 15, East River. 
New York, on November 14 1041 



# ^ 




PHOTO TAKEN 1941 
Age 45 




PHOTO TAKEN 1946 
Age 22 



Homicide 

McKinley Seals — alias Dukey — Age 27 

years; lieight, 5 feet, b niches; weight, 135 
pounds ; maroon eyes ; black hair ; occupation, 
machine operator. He is wanted for shooting 
and killing Jerville Goodman on April 11, 1947. 
He has been indicted and bench warrant has 
heen issued. 



Homicide 



Oc McLeod — .\yc 4j; lieigiu 5 fcel. b J 
inches; weight 138 pounds; brown eyes; black 
liair. He is wanted in connection with the 
perpetration of a homicide by stabbing, at 
Ear Rcickaway, Queens on .^ugust 1, 1051. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 40 



Membert of the Force who ore successful in the apprehension of any person described on this page or who may obtoin information which 

will lead to his arrest will receive Departmental Recognition. 

GEORGE P. MONAGHAN, Police Commissioner. 



I, NO. 2 



FEBRUARY, 1952 




Published by the 

OLICE DEPARTMENT 
CITY OF NEW YORK 



GEORGE P. MONAGHAN 
Commissioner 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



FRANK FRISTENSKY, JR. 

First Deputy Commissioner 



PtI. Joseph A. Callohon 

Polw. Yelta Cohn 

Pll. Thomas P. Connors 





A MAGAZINE FOK POLICEMEN 



FRANK D. DOYLE 

Secretary of the Deportment, Editor 

CONRAD H. ROTHENGAST 

chief Inspector 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Sgt. William M. Hambrecht 



Vol 23 



JAMES Mcelroy 

Chief of Staff 



PtI. Joseph Gangi 
Det. James W. Magner 
PtI. Gerald Walsh 



No. 2 



In This Issue 

Poge 

EDITORIAL ' 

NEWSPAPER AWARDS 2 

TIMES SQUARE PATROL 3 

PROMOTIONS 6 

INCOME TAX 8 

ALL IN THE DAYS WORK 10 

TOP COMMAND 13 

FINGERPRINTS BY TELEPHONE 14 

D.P.C. AARON FRANKS 16 

LAW HIGHLIGHTS 17 

RETIREMENTS 18 

THE RETIRED RING IN 19 

THE OLD FORTY-NINER 20 

SHORT STORY 21 

STUDY HALL 23 

MEMO BOOK-PARK REGULATIONS 25 

DOWN THE LINE 29 

BROWSING IN THE LIBRARY 31 

LOOKING EM OVER 32 
AMENDMENTS 34-36-38 

IN MEMORIAM 40 

PRECINCT REPORTERS 

PtI. Michoel C. Zapf (3rd Pet.); PtI. William 
Sanjour iSth Pet.); PtI. Nicholos Perrino (13th 
Pet.); PtI. Chorles F. Sullivan, Jr. (22nd Pet.); PtI. 
Raymond R. Wieboldt (28lh Pet.); Pll. Dan 
Crowley and PtI. Gene Loewy 143rd Pet.); PtI. 
Nicholas Parpon !l02nd Pet.;; PtI. Anthony Doyle 
(111th Pet.); PtI. William Burke (Troffie G); Mrs. 
Rose Lupo (Division of Licenses). 



Published by the Police Department, City of 

New York. 

Copyright, 1952, by Police Department City of 

New York. 
No port of this publication may be reproduced 
in whole or in part without written permission 

from the editor. 

Address all communications to SPRING 3100, 

400 Broome Street, New York 13, N. Y. 



Letters 



Narcotics 

Dear Sir: 

Co ngratu lotions on your article on the Drug 
Traffic. It was the most complete, concise and 
educational piece for a policeman that I've seen 
so far. There was just one point that wos not 
given enough prominence. That is the importance 
of vigilance on the part of the foot patrolman. 
Too few persons realize that the cop on the beat 
is actually the eors, eyes and backbone of any 
efftcient police department. . . . Keep up the 
good work and let's have more educational reod- 
ing in SPRING 3100. 

Truly yours, 

A Nassau County policeman. 

(name withheld by request) 



De 



Sir: 



I would greatly appreciate it if you would 
send me a copy of SPRING 3100, containing the 
comprehensive article on narcotics published . . . 
for members of the force. 

Very sincerely yours, 
Frank P. O'Brien, M.D. 
Associate Superintendent 
NYC Board of Education. 



Deor Sir: 

I hove just finished reading the excellent article 
on Narcotics. . . . Because of the completeness 
of the material covered, is it possible to send 
me three copies so that our teachers in health 
education, who teach a full unit on narcotics, may 
benefit thereby. . . . 

Very sincerely yours, 
Alexander G. Rudel 
Long Island High School 



Ed. Note: SPRING 3100 hos received numerous 
requests for copies of the article on narcotics. 
These were received from schools, courts, the U.N. 
Commission on Narcotics, police departments, mag- 
azines and newspapers all over the country. As 
long OS the supply lasts, we are trying to comply 
with these requests.) 



Memoranda 

Febrourcy 1952 
4. NY POLICE POST, VFW. Meeting. Sokol Hall. 

7. ST. GEORGE ASSN. Meeting. Masonic 
Temple. 

11 NYC GARRISON 3100. Meeting. Clubhouse. 

12. LINCOLN'S BIRTHDAY. 

POLICE SQUARE CLUB. Meeting. Masonic 
Temple. 8 P.M. 

14. CAPTAINS' ASS'N. Meeting. 12 Noon. 

18. SHOMRIM SOC. Meeting. Riverside Plaza. 



19. COLUMBIA ASS'N. Meeting. Werdermonn 
Hall. 

NYC POST, AL. Meeting. Jewish Guild for 
Blind. 8:30 P.M. 



21. CIVILIAN COUNCIL Meeting. Triol Room. 
6 P.M. 

DETECTIVES ASSN. Meeting. Hotel Croydon. 

22. WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY. 

25 NYC GARRISON 3100. Meeting. Clubhouse. 
ANCHOR CLUB Meeting. Tough Club. 

26. WM. E. SHERIDAN POST. Meeting. Club- 
house. 



27. LIEUTENANTS ASS N. Meeting. Gov. Clinton 
Hotel. 



FRONT COVER 

SHADES OF GEORGE WASHING- 
TON. The young fellow told no 
lies when he explained that his 
presence with a cardboard hatchet 
beside the toppled tree was merely 
a coincidence. 

(Photo by Detective James Magner, 
Bureau of Public Relations.^ 




from f/>9ii»2Eesfc on 



Our Urgent Need For Blood 

IF someone should tap you on the shoulder at this ver}- minute, and 
pointing to a stretcher-case behind the lines in Korea, inform you 
that fifteen minutes of your time and a pint of your blood would save 
that soldier's life, would you refuse? I know you would not. Daily you 
make much greater sacrifices in the protection of life and property. 

Aside from the needs of our Armed Forces, there is another aspect 
to this matter of blood donations, and a moment's reflection on the 
events within our own city during the past year might provide the 
impetus for greater support for the American Red Cross Blood Donor's 
Campaign. 

Can any of us in the Police Department forget those seemingly 
endless hours when Detective Howard Phelan hovered between life 
and death as pint after pint of life-sustaining plasma dripped into his 
veins? Fortunately, God saw fit to spare him. It would be rather 
presumptuous to rely on miracles when we ha\e it within our own 
power to help sustain life in another. 

Last year, the Police Department through the ]\Iedical and Surgical 
Bureau supplied almost 2,100 pints of blood, not only to the members 
of the force but also to members of their immediate families. Our dona- 
tions to the blood bank did not keep pace with our withdrawals. 

Now is the time, not only to make up the deficit but to provide a 
margin of safety for future contingencies. None of us can foretell the 
moment when we will be everlastingly grateful for the existence of an 
adequate blood bank. 

Those members who relied on the resources of the bank during 
the past year should personally see to it that at least an equal number 
of pints are replaced. They should enlist the aid of fellow members of 
their commands to repay this "moral" obligation. 

Those members who have yet to seek out the department's aid 
for themselves or their loved ones should anticipate the need and give 
their pint now. Appointments may be made through the various com- 
manding officers or supervisory heads. I strongly urge your support 
of this very urgent and extremely humane cause. 



Ljeorae / . 1 1' lonaali 



tan 

COMMISSIONER 



Detectives And Uniformed Men Share 

Newspaper Awards 




THE NEWS HERO AWARD is presented by the Police Com- 
missioner. Left to Right: Detective Robert McDermott, Mrs. 
Eileen McDermott, Robert McDermott Jr., Commissioner Mon- 
aghan, Mrs. Albert Beron and Detective Beron (extreme right). 
Around Mrs. Beron are Elizabeth, Lorraine and Rose Beron, 
while the Beron boys, Edward and Albert Jr., stand in rear. 



(Kignt). As 14-month-old Margaret Mary Browne receives 
support from the broad shoulders of PtI. Norton Baxt and the 
arms of her father, PtI. Cornelius Browne, Commissioner 
Monaghan presents the JOURNAL-AMERICAN cash awards to 
Mrs. Eleanor Browne and Mrs. Deborah Baxt. Browne (right) 
and Baxt hold their Certificates of Honor. 



Daily News Aivard To Detective— Killers Of Ex-Convict; 
Journal • American Honors Slayers Of Armed Maniac 



DETECTIVES Albert Beron and Rob- 
ert McDermott, 73rd Squad, who, 
last December 15, shot and killed a 
notorious, dope-crazed ex-convict who 
had boasted he would never be taken 
alive, were declared winners of the 
Daily News Award for December. At 
a ceremony in Police Headquarters on 
January 2, the officers received the 
awards from the Police Commissioner 
while their wives and children looked 
on. 

Beron, a member of the force for 
twenty-seven years, is the holder of 
fourteen previous citations. McDer- 
mott, who joined the department five 
years ago after service as an infantry- 
man in World War IT, had been 
previously cited six times. 

A detail of five detectives, includint; 
Beron and McDermott, went to a hotel 
in Brooklyn's Bedford-Stuyve.sant sec- 
tion early on the morning of December 
15, after a tip was received that a 
gunman, high on the department's 
wanted list, was in hiding iIktc. I It- 
was Percy Alston, 21, who had Inen 
previously convicted of rape and 
burglary and who was wanted for a 
recent series of Brooklyn stick-ups in 
one of which he had shot his victim. 

The police secured from the desk 
clerk a passkey to Alston's room and 



entered quietly. Alston, asleep on a 
couch, woke up with a start and 
grabbed a nearby automatic. However, 
Beron and McDermott each got off 
two quick shots and Alston fell dead. 
A search of the desperado's room dis- 
closed a loaded sawed-ofif shotgun, a 
quantity of shells and some marijuana 
cigarettes. 

Joiirnal-.4merican Award 

Patrolman Norton Baxt, 82nd Pre- 
cinct and Patrolman Cornelius J. 
Browne, Emergency Service Squad 13, 
won the Journal-American December 
Public Protector Award for having 
emerged victorious in a death struggle 
with a knife-wielding maniac in the 
attic of a Brooklyn rooming house. 

On the evening of December 23, 
Ben 'M Bechir, a French Moroccan 
sailor, suddenly went beserk from drug 
addiction and began to shout and 
threaten other occupants of the room- 
ing house with an 18-inch knife. After 
the police had surrounded the house, 
two tear gas grenades were lobbed into 
the seaman's room hut thoy failed to 
dislodge him. 

Officers Baxt and Browne, wearing 
gas masks and carrying portable lights, 
ascended the stairway and had to 



clainber over furniture that the mad- 
man lad thrown down at them. With 
drawn gun, Baxt entered the unlighted 
room to take him into custody. The 
seaman was hiding in a closet. Baxt 
placed his light on the floor and kicked 
open the door. The seaman sprang at 
him. slashing with his knife. Baxt 
grappled with the madman, and got in 
several blows with his night baton. 
Both men were wedged against the 
hallway door and this prevented 
Browne from gaining immediate entry 
to the room. Finally by lunging against 
the door, he succeeded in forcing it 
open. Meanwhile, the fierceness of the 
struggle inounted to the point that 
Patrolman Baxt had to shoot his vio- 
lent assailant. As he was pushed into 
the hallway, the sailor then slashed at 
Browne and cut his right hand. Patrol- 
man Browne fired two more shots, 
which ended the furious struggle. He 
then carried Baxt, bleeding and ex- 
hausted, to the street. 

Police Commissioner George P. 
Monaghan presented hand illuminated 
certificates of honor to the two officers 
on January 5, in the presence of their 
wives. The Brownes' daughter Mar- 
garet Marv, 14 months, was also 
present. Both policemen are army 
veterans of World N\ :n- TI. 




Polw. Elizabeth Burke and PtI. Daniel 
Scannell leave their headquarters at the 
16th Precinct to begin their patrol. 



IN its recent survey on the work of the Jmenile Aid Bureau, the Citizens 
Committee on the Children of New York commented : "One cannot over- 
estimate the importance of the poHce functions of patrolHng, observing, 
reporting, investigating and sometimes arresting. If the poHce do these things 
well, they can help young people in a very real way to understand and recog- 
nize the meaning of law and order, rules and punishment. . . . New York's 
program compares favorably with others in these respects and one can only 
urge that the Juvenile Aid Bureau continue, expand and make even more 
effective, intelligent and considerate policing particularly where young people 
are involved". 

The committee's report, in part, refers to the Juvenile Aid Bureau's teams 
of patrolmen and policewomen who are assigned to regular patrol of the city's 
trouble spots which attract youngsters. Some of these areas, like Coney Island 
and Central Park, are seasonal in nature; others like Broadway require atten- 
tion on an all year round basis. Broadway being the number one magnet of 
the country for youths, means that manv a delincjuent bov and girl can be 
expected to "hit" Times Scjuare. As a result a permanent squad is assigned 
by the Ju\enile Aid Bureau to this area. 

The policeman-policewoman teams begin their work at 9 P.M. and finish 
as one patrolman said, "when the work is done". That is frequently not until 
much later the next day and is never before 4 A.M. 

Cases are referred to the squad from the courts, the Missing Persons 
Bureau, distraught parents, the Navy's Shore Patrol, the Army's Military 
Police and corrective institutions from all over the country. Armed with 
photographs and descriptions, the teams set out nightly from the 16th Precinct 
to find their missing or delinquent children. Although the bulk of runaways 
come from New York City homes, the squad has located and returned youths 
to their homes in Ireland, Czechoslovakia, Mexico, and California. 



PtI. Scannell and Polw. Burke question a young couple whose behavior has attracted their attention. Note that young 
man and girl are being questioned unobtrusively. Times Square area is constantly patrolled by Juvenile Aid Bureau 

teams. Other areas in the City receive "seasonal" patrolling as needed. 




SPtCIAL WECKCY HATM 



SPECIAL 



iWEEKUr S MONTHLY rates! 

SIGH T S E EING 



» O »• r I c B 





Above: Frequently, parents come in to ask the aid of the 
squad in locating missing children. Below: The team 
checks hotels in an efFort to locate a girl reported missing. 




LOST OR STRAYED YOUTHS FROM 7 TO 21 
ARE THE CHARGES OF THE SQUAD 

Through the grape-vine tliat runs through this "lost" 
chiidron's world, the youngsters seem to gravitate to certain 
hotels, bars, cafeterias and movies. Fortunately, the relation- 
ship between the proprietors of these establishments and 
the squad is excellent and it is not an infrequent occurrence 
for a room clerk to call the squad and inform it of the 
presence of a girl or boy whose activities seem questionable. 
Jjecause of this cooperation and the constant patrolling of 
the area, it is not possible for a boy or girl to remain a run- 
away or "lost" for very long. 

The anonymity, the shelter and warmth of bus and rail- 
road terminals attract the runaway or delinquent, and the 
squad regularly flushes a crop of "wanted" children in these 
spots. Children who are not accompanied by adults and who 
do not seem to be going anywhere, even if they have some 
luggage are watched. Dirt is the give-away. The runaway is 
usually dirty. His clothes are rumpled and he gives all evi- 
dence of having slept in them — which he undoubtedly has. 

It might seem inconceivable that a seven-year-old's actions 
would warrant police attention, yet frequently the squad 
picks up children that young who are selling newspapers, 
shining shoes, begging or just wandering about at two a.m. 
The question might well be asked : "Where are the parents 
of these children?" The answer too often can be found in 
the corner bar where the parent is "just having a beer." 

It is a cliche, sad but true, that the Navy remains the star 
attraction for girls. Statistics show that the squad's activity 
rises when the fleet is in town and declines when the ships 
weigh anchor. Girls involved in these situations are sexually 
promiscuous, frequently diseased and as such are a menace 
to themselves and societ\'. They frequent cheap bars and 
furnished apartments on the extreme West Side since most 
hotels refuse them entry. Pathetic attempts are made to 
appear older by lathering their faces with heavy make-up 
and dressing "older" — which means high-heel, cutaway 
shoes and much junk jewelry. The net result, of course, 
only draw's attention to their youthfulness. Girls as young 
as twelve years old have been picked up in these sordid 
circumstances. 

According to the Alcoholic Beverage Control regulations, 
no person under the age of eighteen may be served an 
alcoholic beverage in a public bar. The penalties for this are 
severe — entailing suspension of the owner's license. Children 
under sixteen are not permitted in a public dance hall, cab- 
aret, bar and grill, pool and billiard parlor or bowling alley 
unless accompanied by a parent or guardian. The Times 
.Square Squad in its patrol covers all these establishments, 
discreetly observing the patrons to see that there are no 
violations of law. Frequently, it becomes necessarj' to ques- 
tion a patron about his or her age. Some who are questioned 
carry birth certificates or other documentary evidence which 
establishes their age as over twenty-one. Astute questioning 
in these instances, generally reveals that those who go to 
the bother of carrying documentary evidence are generally 
carrying false evidence. The trained, experienced eyes of the 
squad members can judge a minor's age accurately by ap- 
pearance and manner, despite attempts at camouflage. 



SPRING 3100 acknowledges with thanks the ossistonce 
received in the preparation of this article from 
Inspector John J. Jones, Acting Lieutenant John J. Forrell, 
Policewomen Elizabeth Burke, Priscilla Wolfe, and Patrol- 
men Daniel Sconnell, John Sweeney and James Tallon. 



— 4 — 



SPECIAL PROCEDURES DETERMINE 
DISPOSITION OF THE JUVENILE 

It has long been established that the juvenile requires 
special treatment by police officers and the judiciary. Certain 
safeguards and methods of procedure by both agencies have 
been set up and incorporated into law to protect the juvenile 
whose actions demand corrective or authoritative treatment. 
Chapter 716 of the New York City Charter, for instance, 
sets up a Girls' Term Court which has exclusive jurisdiction 
over all girls between the ages of sixteen and twenty-one 
whose conduct is delinquent or immoral. In order not to 
stigmatize the girl as a criminal, "proceedings under this 
act are deemed to be civil in character." 

Other courts have been set up and have special jurisdic- 
tion over minors who are in conflict with the law. Under 
the Youth Term Act, special Youth Parts have been estab- 
lished in the Magistrates', Special Sessions, General Ses- 
sions and County Courts of the city. Other special courts are : 

Children's Court: a part of the Domestic Relations Court, 
which is for all children up to the age of sixteen, except for 
murder cases in the first degree if the juvenile is fifteen 
years old. The case would then go through regular channels. 

Girls' Term: for girls between the ages of sixteen and 
twenty-one charged with delinquency or immorality. 

Adolescent Court: In Brooklyn and Queens only, for 
boys and girls between the ages of sixteen and eighteen. 
Under the Youth Act, the juvenile is charged with being a 
youthful offender and his crime is adjudicated as an offense. 
All records are impounded and cannot be i:sed against him 
for future reference. 

DETENTION AND TRANSPORTATION 

In compliance with the Girls' Term Act, the department 
requires that any girl taken into custody shall not be trans- 
ported in a patrolwagon containing male minors or adult 
prisoners. When being sent to a shelter or Girls' Term 
Court, she shall be transported by a vehicle of the Juvenile 
Aid Bureau in the custody of a policewoman. The Juvenile 
Aid Bureau in complying with this regulation has long 
maintained a station wagon, manned by a team composed 
of a patrolman and policewoman in plainclothes. The car is 
on twenty- four hours duty, seven days a week and responds, 
when possible, to calls from any section of the city. There 
are no identifying insignia on the car. 

Girls are transported from the place of pick-up to a 
place of detention ; from certain detention places to court ; 
from court to the Euphrasian Residence, Bcllevue or Kings 
County Hospitals or any other place for temporary shelter 
pending investigation and adjudication. 

Whenever possible when a juvenile is picked-up, his par- 
ents are notified and the juvenile is released in their custody 
until court appearance (if necessary). Frequently however, 
the parent is not immediately available. Runaways from out 
of town have to be detained until their parents arrive. Some 
parents refuse to take their children back into the home. 
Children wanted on a court warrant have to be detained 
until they can be brought into court. In these instances, sev- 
eral institutions have been designated to care for children 
when shelter must be provided. 

^Conh'nued on page 18^ 




Above: Transportation terminals are favorite hide-outs for 
runaways or delinquents. Below: A "runaway" is trans- 
ported by station-wagon to a designated shelter. 




— 5 — 




EVERYBODY'S HAPPY that "pop" is a sergeant. Clustered 
about Sergeant Michael Keohane, 16th Precinct, are Mrs. 



I 'tiily Mtrrcr Fhoto 

Keohane (standing next to Commissioner Monaghan) and oil 
the future representatives of the Keohane clan. 



TWENTY-NINE PROMOTIONS MADE 

Assistant Chief Inspector Berkerv Heads Group 



A small but enthusiastic audience compo.sed of friends 
and relatives was present when Commissioner George 
P. Monaghan promoted twenty-nine members of the force 
in the Trial Room at Police Headquarters on January 11. 
Topping the list of promotions was Thomas F. Berkery, 
Commanding Officer of the Division of Licenses, who was 
promoted to the rank of assistant chief inspector. In con- 
gratulating Chief Berkery, the Police Commissioner said : 
"Everybody is happy about the selection of Tom to fill this 
high rank. For years, Chief Berkery has run this important 
division in a workmanlike, efficient manner. You ha\e all 
out best wishes." 

Next on the list was James Nidds, Commanding Officer 
of the Supervising and Investigating Unit of the Chief 
Inspector's Office, who was promoted to the rank of 



deputy chief inspector. Of him. tin.- Commissioner stated, 
"We all recognize the vast importance of the job which 
Deputy Chief Inspector Nidds holds. His duties are many 
and difficult. It is a well-deserved promotion for a job 
well-done.'' 

Deputy Inspector John J. Jones, Commanding Officer of 
the Juvenile Aid Bureau and Deputy Inspector Cornelius J. 
Lyons, now assigned to Manhattan I'"ast Hcadcjuarters, were 
then promoted to the rank of inspector. The Commissioner 
had words of praise for the two new inspectors. He said, 
"Inspector Jones has done a tremendously good job with 
the Juvenile Aid Bureau. He is doing a tine job in keeping 
children from running afoul of the law'." He congratulated 
Inspector Lyons, saying, "He has served his community 
well. Not only do all members of the department concur in 



— 6 




COMMISSIONER MONAGHAN congratulates Assistant Chief 
Inspector Berkery. Standing in line are Deputy Chief Inspector 

his appointment but men from all walks of life in the 
community he served have spoken well of him. He well 
deserves his promotion." 

In promoting two captains to the rank of deputy inspec- 
tor, the Commissioner said, "Both of these men are doing 
excellent work as policemen. Everyone I consulted was 
unanimous in recommending them for promotion." Re- 
cipients of the promotion to deputy inspector were Captain 
James J. Morrissey and Michael A. O'Neill. 

Promotions from Civil Service lists then followed. Two 
captains, seven lieutenants and fourteen sergeants were ap- 
pointed. In addition, three policewomen were inducted as 
probationary policewomen. 

The Commissioner pledged himself to make appoint- 
ments for all vacancies as they occur. He pointed out that 
in the past few months, the department has regained the 
confidence of the public and that this was evident from the 
large amount of unsolicited, commendatory mail received 
dailv in his office. 



ASS'T. CHIEF INSPECTOR 

Thomas F. Berkerv, Off of 
4th D.P.C. 

DEP. CHIEF INSPECTOR 

James Nidds, O.C.I. 

INSPECTORS 

CorneHus J. Lyons, Boro Hq.. 

Man. E. 
John J. Jones, J.A.B. 

DEPUTY INSPECTORS 

Michael .A, O'Neill, Idth Div. 



Tames J. Morrissey, E.S.D. 

CAPTAINS 

Edward T. Sullivan, Hq. Div., 

M.T.S.' 
Francis X. Roche, 22nd Div. 

LIEUTENANTS 

John T. Callahan, Jr., Traf. O. 
Marion Miller, llth Pet. 
Michael T. Yorke. 6th Pet. 
Thomas j. Doyle, 76th Pet. 
Stephen T. Walsh. 67th Pet. 
Carl F. C. Palm, 62nd Pet. 
Tohn T. Downer, 70th Pot. 



Nidds, Inspectors Jones and Lyons, and Deputy Inspectors 
O'Neill and Morrissey. 




CHIEF CLERK VINCENT E. FINN administers the oath to the new 

sergeants. 

SERGEANTS 



Joseph R. Harley, C.O.D.D. 
James M. Neylon, D.D. Boro. 

Hq. Man. E. 
Gerard \'. Bovle, Traf. B. 
Henry C. Bischoff, 14th Pet. 
Daniel T. Scannell, Tr., Det. 

Div. 
Michael Keohane. 16th Pet. 
Tames C. Tasinski. 122nd Pet. 



Wiliam H. Tohnson, Mtd. Sqd. 

No. 1. 
Charles T. Bradley. 6th Pet. 
.■\rmando J. Zona, 15th Pet. 
Adam J. Noreika, 17tli Pet. 
Saul Sehisler, 46th Pet. 
Hugh J. Cullen, 50th Pet. 
lohn T. O'Connor, 90th Pet. 



CAPTAINS Roche (I.) and Sullivan (r.). THE NEWLY PROMOTED LIEUTENANTS are sworn in for their new duties. 




• 










FORM 1040 

U.S. Treasury Department 
Internal Revenue Service 



U. S. INDIVIDUAL INCOME TAX RETURN 

FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1951 

or taxable year bBglnnin?_ , 195 .■., and ending . ,195 



1951 



N»mc I«M^ Police Officer 

(PLEASE PRINT. It ihis li .1 lomt rtlurii o( liu'^bjnd anJ witc, use first names of bolli I 

HOME ADDRESS 240 Centre Street. 

(PLEASE PRINT. Street and number or rural route) 

New York City 13 New York 

(City, town, or post office) (Postal zone number) (State) 



Social Security No. 



Occupation 



Do not write in these spaces 



Sfiul 
No. 



(Cnhier't Scamp) 



1. List your name, 
had no inc" 
list also ' 



wife (or husband) 
•■-„•■ ■ ■ return, 



Check bel' 
your 



INCOME tax time — when the ordinary taxpayer marvels at 
the diabolical ingenuity of the tax forms — is just around 
the corner again. Contrary to popular belief, the tax col- 
lector does not sit up nights trying to devise a tax return 
which has all the intricacies of a Rube Goldberg drawing. 

Actually the Bureau of Internal Revenue is constantly 
striving to make the tax return forms as simple as possible 
without sacrificing any pertinent information. Adequate 
forms must be available for all types of taxpayers. It may 
be that confusion is caused because there are so many 
alternatives available to the average taxpayer. A simple, 
down-to-earth explanation of the tax regulations may 
assist the members of the department with this annual 
headache. 

In the sheet of instructions which accompany the return, 
reference is made to the term "adjusted gross income." For 
the typical member of the Police Department, total income 
(salary plus income from dividends, interest and other 
specified sources) will be the same as his "adjusted gross 
income." In a few cases, it may differ, as for example, 
where there are losses from the sale of stocks and bonds or 
where the deductible expenses of real property exceed the 
rental received therefrom. 

Because these cases are in the niinorit}', the use of the 
term "total income" will be less confusing than "adjusted 
gross income." The ensuing explanations will be more 
readily understood through the use of the term "total 
income." However, the Internal Revenue Act specifies 
"adjusted gross income" and in case of doubt, that defini- 
tion is the controlling factor. 

Salary for income tax purposes means the full amount 
earned before making deductions for pension contributions, 
withholding taxes or hospitalization plans. The earnings 
of children are not reported as additional income of the 
parents. Such employed children, from whose earnings 
withholding tax deductions have been made, are required 
to file individual returns. If they earned less than $675 
during the year, no tax is payable; but if taxes have been 
withheld from this amount, a tax return should nevertheless 
be filed in order to obtain a refund of the amount deducted. 



Pensions as Income 

Income from pensions recei\ed by retired members of 
the force is subject to taxation. In every instance, the full 
amount received is not necessarily the "income," because 
the taxpayer is entitled to recover, tax-free, the actual cost 
of the pension. In other words, he gets back the amount that 
he paid into the pension fund without paying a further tax 
thereon. 

However, even though the government is willing to 
acknowledge that your contributions into the pension fund 



' On lines A and B below — 

■"'ther 65 nor blind write the fl"-- 
•!5 or blind write th' 



are not subject to further tax, it requires that three per 
cent of the cost (not of the money received) be considered 
as income during the first year. For example, a member 
of the force during his years in the department pays 
$10,000 into the pension fund. Upon retirement, he is 
awarded an annual pension of $2,000. Assuming that he 
retired on January 1, his income for the year for income 
tax purposes would be three per cent of $10,000 of $300. 
The remaining $1700 is considered a return of the tax- 
payer's cost. 

In the following year, another $300 of the pension 
received would have to be considered as income and once 
more, the balance of $1700 would represent a return of 
cost. After the passage of five years, the taxpayer would 
have had $8,500 of his cost returned free from tax. In 
computing his tax for the sixth year, he would have to 
include $500 as his income as shown below : 

Pension received $2,000. 

Cost of pension $10,000. 

Returned as cost— 5 years 8,500. 



Balance to be recovered 
Income for the sixth year 



1,500. 



$ 500. 



Because the full cost of $10,000 would have been recovered 
by the end of the sixth year, all of the pension received 
in the seventh and subsequent years will be considered as 
income. 

Choosing Proper Form 

There are three optional methods of reporting your 
Federal income tax: on Form 1040A (a simplified return) ; 
on Form 1040 — Short Form (a more detailed return) ; and 
on Form 1040 — Long Form (a very detailed return). If 
Form 1040A is used, the taxpayer makes no computation; 
and no payment for any unpaid balance of tax is made at 
the time of filing. The Collector of Internal Revenue will 
compute the tax and if additional tax is due, he will send a 
bill. If the taxpayer is entitled to a' refund, a check will be 
mailed to him. 

Tax Form 1040 is identical for use either as the Short 
Form or the Long Form. When used as a Short Form, 
only the first two pages are used, and the tax is computed by 
the taxpayer from a table which is attached. When used 
as a Long Form, the three pages are used, and the taxpayer 
computes his tax in accordance with the percentages shown 
at the bottom of page three of the form. 

Any individual taxpayer, or a husband and wife jointly, 
may file Form 1040-Long Form, but in most cases it would 
not be to their advantage to do so. Form 1040-Short Form 
and Form 1040A are limited to those taxpayers whose total 



— 8- 



income is less than $5,000. For the purpose of aiding mem- 
bers of the department in choosing the most advantageous 
method of reporting their income, the following schedule of 
expenditures should be filled in : 

Contributions $ 

Interest (on loans, on mortgages, or on 
installment purchases if amount is shown 
separately on contract) 

Taxes (auto registration plates; operator's 
or chauffeur's license; gasoline taxes 
(four cents a gallon in N. Y.); real 
estate taxes but not assessments for 
improvements or water taxes; sales 
taxes on purchase; New York State 
income tax). 

Losses to real and personal property 
(including automobiles) from hurricane, 
storm, theft or collision, but such losses 
to be reduced by amounts recovered 
through insurance, if any 

Medical and dental expenses (including 
payments for doctors, dentists, chiropo- 
dists, optometrists, drugs, medicines, eye 
glasses, nurses and their board, premi- 
ums for hospitalization plan, and acci- 
dent and health insurance, but deduct- 
ing reimbursements received under 
hospitalization or other insurance 
policies) $ 

Deduct 5% of your total income 

Balance (if any) is deductible 

Automobile Expenses and Depreciation. 
Allowable only to members of force, 
such as detectives, whose commanding 
officer will give them a letter stating 
that the automobile must be used in 
police work. Does not apply to going 
or coming from work. Only percentage 
of expenses and depreciation applicable 
to police work may be deducted. 

Bullets and equipment necessary to your 

work. 

Dues to line organizations 

Uniforms (purchase and upkeep) 

House tax • 

TOTAL $ 

For typical members of the force, if the total of the 
above schedule is less than $440 for first grade patrolmen, 
or $490 for sergeants and second grade detectives, then you 
would pay a lesser tax by filing Form 1040A. You are 
permitted to file this simplified form of return provided 
that: 

If single— Your income consisting of salary 
and not more than $100.00 from sources 
such as dividends, interest, or other in- 
come (not including profit on renting 
property or on sale of securities) from 
which no tax has been withheld = 
under $5,000. 



If married— Combined income as above — 
under $5,000. 

Married persons may file a Joint Return even though one 
spouse has no income. Under ordinarj' circumstances, mar- 
ried persons who file a Joint Return will pay a smaller tax 
than if each spouse filed separate returns. 

If the total of the above schedule for sergeants and sec- 
ond grade detectives amounts to less than $490, and for 
first grade patrolmen to less than $440 ; and there is profit 
or loss from renting property or from selling securities or 
other income of more than $100, then you may file Form 
1040 — Short Form. This form, although requiring more 
information, also provides the chief benefit of Form 1040A 
in that you receive an automatic deduction for permissible 
expenses equal to ten per cent of your income. 

Form 1040 — Long Form must be filed by members of 
the department having an income equivalent to that of 
lieutenant or higher. This form may also be used by 
sergeants and second grade detectives whose schedules' 
totals exceed $490, or by first grade patrolmen whose totals 
exceed $440. In the latter cases, all deductible expenses 
must be itemized in order that the tax collector may see 
in what respect they amount to more than ten per cent of 
your total income. 

Even though members of the force of the rank of lieu- 
tenant or higher are required to file Form 1040 — Long 
Form, they may forego the necessity of itemizing their 
deductions on page three of the form if the total of the 
schedule at the start of this article does not exceed ten 
per cent of their income. This can be accomplished by 
claiming the standard deduction of ten per cent of income, 
but not in excess of $1000, on Line No. 2 in the Tax 
Computation part of page three of the return. 

Personal Exemptions 

Regardless of the tj-pe of tax return that is filed, the 
amounts deductible as personal exemptions are the same. 
The taxpayer is entitled to an exemption of $600. If a 
Joint Return is filed, an additional exemption of $600 may 
be claimed for the wife. If the married status exists on 
December 31, then you are considered married for the 
entire year even though actually married for a shorter 
period. On the other hand, if the spouse should die during 
the year, a Joint Return may still be filed, and an exemp- 
tion of $600 taken for the deceased spouse. 

Dependent relatives and children (i.e. those w'ho receive 
more than one-half of support from you and have an an- 
nual income of less than $600) provide an additional ex- 
emption of $600 each. Further exemptions of $600 are 
granted to the taxpayer and/or his wife if they are over 
65 years of age and another $600 to either or both of them, 
if they are blind. The exemptions for blindness or being 
over 65 years of age do not apply to dependent relatives. 

Filing the Return 

Joint returns should be signed b}" both husband and wife, 
even though one of them had no income during the year. 
The signature or signatures do not have to be sworn to 
before a Notary Public. The original of the Withholding 
Tax Statement (Form W-2) should be attached to the 
return. Checks or money orders for the balance of the tax 
due should be made payable to the Collector of Internal 
Revenue. 

(Continued on page J 2.) 



•9 — 



m % Ike half '^ Wctk 



The Lady is in Distress 




L. I. Press Photo 

PATROLMEN HENRY DANKENBRINK, MARTIN MULLIN AND JERRY STANTON, 110th 
Pet., come to the aid of a distressed lady caught in an embarrassing position. Her tears 
stopped a few moments after this picture was taken when the gallant gentlemen 
released her from the railing separating the living room-dining room in her home in 

Forest Hills. 



PATROLMEN Henry Kronin and 
Joseph Lynch, 26th Precinct, l>e- 
came gold prospectors last January 9, 
when thoy inv(^stifrate(l a car parked 
at 93th .Street, off the West Side High- 
way. As the officers approached, a 
package was tossed out of the car and 
over the retaining wall. 

Two men and a woman were in the 
car. Patrolman Kronin ordered the 
driver out for questioning while Pa- 
trolman Lvnch peered over the wall 
to locate the package. Meanwhile, the 
brother of the driver slipped out of 
the car and jumped Patrolman Kro- 
nin. With Lynch's help, both men 
were subdued. 

In the automobile, the officers found 
fifteen, paper wrapped packages. Each 
contained a bar of gold, some of 
which were marked "U. S. Assay 
Office, Fine." The sixteenth package 



which had been thrown over the wall 
was also recovered, and the entire 
seizure weighed 1,180 ounces. 

The three prisoners, who had immi- 
grated to this country last October, 
were booked at the 26th Precinct and 
later turned over to Secret Service 
Agents. 

pATROLMEN Louis Bravcrman 
-»■ and Joseph Yiachos, both of the 
22nd Precinct, did not celebrate the 
passing of 1951 by making the welkin 
rin^. Instead on December 31 at about 3 
P.AL, they pkingfcd into the icy waters 
lit the Seventy- fourth Street Lake in 
Central Park to rescue three young- 
sters who had fallen through the thin 
ice. Patrolman Bravcrman first spotted 
the three boys as they scampered and 
slid on the ice about fifty feet from 
shore. He called to them and ordered 



them off the thinly frozen surface. 
Even as they defied the order, the ice 
cracked throwing them into the water. 
Patrolman Bravcrman, joined by Pat- 
nilnian Yiachos who had arrived in 
a radio car, promptly doffed their 
outer clothing and plunged into the 
lake. Breaking through the thin ice, 
they waded to the boys, clinging to 
the icy edges, and hauled them out. All 
five were treated for exposure at 
Roosevelt Hospital and then sent 
home. 



ON January 1. three heroic police- 
men attached to the 77th Precinct 
formed a human chain to rescue a 
woman who threatened to jump from 
a window of her blazing apartment at 
632 Herkimer Street. Patrolmen Alex- 
ander Kirsch and Bernard Klein heard 
the screams of the women while they 
were in the station-house. They dashed 
to the nearby scene and were joined 
by Patrolmari Robert Gaul on R.M.P. 
duty. The house was ablaze as a result 
of an oil stove explosion and the men 
were unable to make their way up the 
stairs to the third-floor apartment in 
which the woman was trapped. Plead- 
ing with the woman not to jump, the 
patrolmen dashed into the adjoining 
building. Patrolman Gaul edged his 
way to the end of a ledge at the third 
floor, but found that there were four 
feet between him and the woman — and 
no foothold. Patrolman Kirsch then 
got out on the ledge and held Patrol- 
man Gaul's gun belt. In similar man- 
ner, Patrolman Kirsch was held by 
Patrolinan Klein who had braced his 
feet against a window sill. Then Pat- 
rolman Kirsch leaned out over space 
and grabbed the frantic woman. He 
was pulled back to safety with his 
human cargo by the superhuman 
efforts of Gaul and Klein. The men 
were treated for minor injuries and 
returned to dutv. 



AN observant passer-by thought it 
strange that the bar of a West 
Side grill was deserted at 5 P.M. on 
Christmas eve. Looking closer, he dis- 
covered that three men were holding 
up the proprietor and were in the 



10 — 



process of looting the till. Fifteen pa- 
trons of the bar had been herded into 
the kitchen by the hold-up men, all 
of whom were armed. 

The witness ran to West and North 
Moore Streets where he found Mount- 
ed Patrolman John Tait on his horse, 
Thomas. He quickly told the story 
and Patrolman Tait galloped to the 
scene. He arrived just as two of the 
hold-up men sped from the scene in a 
car, leaving the third man behind. 
Patrolman Tait galloped alongside 
the getaway car and when the driver 
ignored his command to stop, fired 
three bullets into it. The car contin- 
iied to draw away and Tait lost it as 
his mount was unable to keep up the 
pace. 

Tait returned to the scene of the 
hold-up and found the courageous 
witness struggling with the man who 
had been abandoned by his compan- 
ions. Tait subdued the suspect and 
then frisked him. Part of the proceeds 
of the robberv were found on him. 



A T 3 A.M. on the morning of Dec- , 
-^*- ember 10, Mrs. Anna Fagan was 
returning to her home at 946 Bush- 
wick Avenue after a visit to friends. 
She was only a block from her house 
when she was suddenly attacked by 
a man who leaped out of the bushes 
and punched her in the jaw. The man 
then ran off with her purse. Patrolmen 
from the 81st Precinct searched the 
area but could find no trace of him. 

At 4 A.M. Patrolmen Thomas 
Golden and Salvatore Vitucci on 
R.M.P. duty saw a man who was act- 
ing suspiciously. They stopped him and 
found the missing handbag on his 
person. Five more purses, found in the 
man's furnished room, linked him to 
a series of attacks which had been 
plaguing this Brooklyn area. Two 
women definitely identified the man 
as their assailant. 

* * * 

'"pHE 73rd Detective Squad had 
■*■ "dug up" a few good clues. The 
three stickup men who specialized in 
robbing private homes had been de- 
scribed variously as being music-lov- 
ers, the drivers of a new cream-colored 
car, and one had the distinguishing 
feature of a cauliflower ear attached 
to a handsome face. Detective Harold 
Kelly spotted the cream-colored car 
and with his partners. Detectives 
George Ravens, Albert Beron and 
William Matchin, kept it under obser- 
vation. When they saw the man with 



the battered ear, the officers closed in 
and made the arrest. The three had 
boldly burglarized apartments, first 
gaining entrance by flashing a phony 
badge. During one of their sorties, one 
of the trio "entertained" the victims 

by playing the piano. 

* * * 

THREE men who stole an automo- 
bile made the mistake of tangling 
with departmental medal holders. Pa- 
trolmen Frank La Farge, Jr., and 
Walter Bentley of the 24th Precinct. 
At 3 :30 A.M. on the morning of De- 
cember 20, the patrolmen on R.M.P. 
duty spotted the stolen car at Colum- 
bus Avenue and 96th Street and or- 
dered the driver to stop. Instead the 
car raced west to Riverside Drive and 
headed north. By two-way radio, the 
patrolmen advised the Communications 



Bureau of the route of the stolen car, 
and other cars formed a road block 
at 135th Street and Riverside Drive. 
La Farge and Bentley continued their 
pursuit, firing twenty-four bullets into 
the stolen sedan. The fleeing trio re- 
turned the fire by sending six shots 
into the hood and windshield of the 
patrol car. 

The chase was over when the stolen 
car skidded into one of the radio cars 
forming the road-block and turned it 
over. Patrolmen Lester Denmark and 
Sidney Kaminer of the 24th Precinct 
who were in the car suffered concus- 
sions, fortunately not serious, but they 
were removed to Knickerbocker Hos- 
pital. After a brief struggle, the trio 
of suspects was subdued and booked 
on charges of grand larceny and as- 
sault. 



Blood on the Civilian Front 




Daily News Fhoto 

PATROLMEN JOSEPH JOHNSON and EDWARD PUPKE, GCP, assist doctor in adminis- 
tering blood transfusion fo man critically injured in motor accident. 



— 11 — 



On the Scene 




_ . __ Daily Mirror Phot" 

PATROLAAAN HENRY GOLDENBERG, Traffic I, stands guard over robber whom he 
shot and captured after hold-up attempt on liquor store in Brooklyn. 

CERTIFICATE OF HONOR 




Justice Commends 

Department For Cooperation 

During 1951 

Domestic Relations Court Justice J. 
Walter McClancy at the close of last 
year expressed to Police Commissioner 
George P. Monaghan his deep appre- 
ciation for the splendid assistance re- 
ceived from the members of the de- 
partment. 

"Almost daily the members of your 
department from the Detective Divi- 
sion, the officers, both male and fe- 
male, from the Juvenile Aid Bureau, 
as well as members of the Uniformed 
I'orce, come into our court in the per- 
formance of their duties. I have al- 
ways received their fullest assistance 
and cooperation, so that the court and 
police, working in close harmony, have 
been able to take girls and boys from 
the wrong path and place them on the 
right one. I only wish the citizens of 
our city could fully appreciate the fine 
work being done by the members of 
your department." 

Justice McClancy is especially well 
qualified to comment on police-court 
cooperation. He has worked closely 
with the Police Department since 1915, 
when he became associated in a clerical 
capacity with the District Attorney's 
office of Queens County. 



THE YOUNG MEN'S BOARD OF TRADE OF NEW YORK CITY maugurated its annual 
A M *'^"^°*^ °f Honor" award by presenting it to the Juvenile Aid Bureau and the Police 
Athletic League. Commissioner Monaghan accepts the award from the board's presi- 
dent, Charles J. Murphy while Deputy Commissioner James B. Nolan looks on. 



INCOME TAX 

(Continued from page 9) 

Tax returns should be sent to the 
appropriate district office of the Col- 
lector of Internal Revenue as follows : 

First District— 210 Livingston Street, 
Brooklyn 2, New York. (Kings and 
Queens ) 

Second District — Custom House, New 
\'ork 4, New York. (Richmond and 
Manliattan south of the south side of 

.^Mh Street) 

Third District— 110 East 45th Street, 
New York 17, New York. (Manhat- 
tan, from the south side of 35th Street 
to the Bronx County Line) 

Fourteenth District — Federal Building, 
Albany 1, New York. (Bronx) 



12- 



TOP COMMAND 



SKETCHES OF TOP-RANKING MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 



A member of the patrol force almost exclusively since 
his appointment to the force in 1926, Deputy Chief 
Inspector James Nidds is presently in command of the 
Chief Inspector's Supen'ising and Investigating Unit. . . . 
Born in Brooklyn, he was taken to 
Flushing with his family at the age of 
four, where he attended St. Michael's 
Parochial School. . . . His father was 
a motornian with old New York and 
Queens electric line. . . . Prior to join- 
ing the force, he was engaged with a 
brother in the operation of a trucking 
business. . . . Enlisting in the Navy 
early in World War I, he was first as- 
signed as a Boatswain's Mate on the 
USS Connecticut and later did Shore 
Patrol duty in the port of Brest, France. Discharged in 
1919, he did a second hitch from 1920 to 1923. . . . The 
family home is in Flushing, Queens. He and his wife, 
Eileen, have two girls and a boy : Elvida, 24, is the eldest ; 
James A., 17, goes to Bayside High School where he 
captains the basketball team; Eileen, 13^^, is in the eighth 
grade of St. Andrew's Parochial School. . . . He likes 
fishing and boating and is a Dodger rooter. . . . He belongs 
to the Queens Police Post of the American Legion, the 
Anchor Club and the Holy Name Society. 




James Nidds 



AS executive officer of the Division of Civil Defense, 
Inspector Stephen P. Kennedy holds a key post. . . . 
A product of the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn, he went 
on to attend St. John's University and the N. Y. U. School 
of Law from which he received his 
LL.B. in June 1950. . . . Spending 
the majority of his twenty-three 
years on the force as a member of 
the Detective Division, he has served 
on the Manhattan Homicide Squad, 
and as a squad and district com- 
mander. From 1949 to 1951 he 
headed the important Waterfront 
Command. . . . Graduating from the 
FBI National Academy in 1944, he 
Stephen P. Kennedy is a member of the Academy Associ- 
ates in which capacity he takes part in the FBI Crime 
Panels held periodically in Washington. . . . He has had 
several articles on crime published in professional p>olice 
periodicals. . . . Before joining the force he worked as 
checker on warterfront piers. He was also employed as a 
stenographer in the office of the President of the United 
States Steel Corporation. . . . Married in 1929, he and his 
wife, Hortense, live in Bayside with their son Stephen P. 
Jr., who has just enrolled in the University of Notre Dame. 
. . . Inspector Kennedy is a member of the department 
Holy Name Society and the Alumni Association of the 
N. Y. U. Law School. 




A VETERAN of the patrol and traffic branches and a for- 
mer member of the Juvenile Aid Bureau, Inspector 
Francis W. Lent has been with the department for twenty- 
three years. . . . He now commands 
Fourth District Traffic. . . . Born in 
Riverdale, he attended public schools 
in the Kingsbridge section. . . . His 
mother, prior to her marriage, was a 
school teacher. . . . His father, whose 
family ancestry in America dates 
back to 1636, spent forty-nine years 
in the employ of the New York Cen- 
tral Railroad. . . . Formerly an in- 
terior decorator, the inspector also 
spent some time as a performer in 
show business before joining the 
force. . . . Married in 1930, he and his wife, Theresa, are 
the parents of ten children, the second eldest of whom 
is a nun of the Dominican Order. . . . Active in line organi- 
zations throughout his time in the department. Inspector 
Lent served as a PBA Delegate, Recorder of the Lieu- 
tenant's Association, and President of the Captains' 
Association for two 3'ears. . . . He is also a member of the 
Holy Name Society. ... A prolific reader of books on all 
phases of police work, he is the possessor of an extensive 
private library on the subject of law enforcement. 




Francis W. Lent 



NOW in command of First District Traffic with head- 
quarters on West 30th Street, Inspector John J. King 
has a long and varied department experience behind him 
in both the patrol and traffic branches. In addition to having 
been a precinct desk officer, he also 
commanded patrol and traffic pre- 
cincts. As captain of Traffic D, he 
covered the always busy Times 
Square area. . . . Born and raised in 
Greenwich Village, he attended 
Public School 16 and Stu^'^^esant 
High School. . . . He worked for 
the New York Telephone Company 
and in tlie real estate business before 
becoming a cop. . . . Wed in 1929, 
John J. King he and his wife, Grace, reside with 

their family in Jackson Heights. They are the parents of 
three children ; John, 20, a graduate of Xavier High School, 
is in his third year at St. Andrew's Seminary in Poughkeep- 
sie, preparing to become a Jesuit ; Carol Ann, 16, is a 
sophomore in St. Bartholomew's High School; Richard; 
11, attends Blessed Sacrament Parochial School. ... A 
Dodger fan, the inspector also likes fishing and contempor- 
ary novels. . . . He is a member of the Holy Name Societjf 
and the Xavier Fathers' Club. 




13- 



Fingerprints 



by Telephone 



HARTi-ORD, Connecticut is approxi- 
mately 110 miles from New York 
City. Yet, when two men with drawn 
guns entered the Pola Brick Company 
in that city on June 30, 1950, they 
started off a chain of events which 
provided the New York City Police 
Department with the opportunity of 
making its first practical use of a new 
photo transmitting device. 

Installed in the Photographic Bureau 
at Police Headquarters, Manhattan, 
this electronic device is capable of send- 
ing and receiving fingerprints and 
photographs over a telephone circuit 
to anj- similar machine in a distant 
city. For several years, this type trans- 
mitter has been used in sending photo- 
graphs of current events to metropoli- 
tan newspapers using the service. 

The Hartford holdup netted the gun- 
men $800 which was taken from the 
safe's vaullbox after they had tied up 
the proprietor and his wife. Detectives 
accompanied the victims to the Con- 
necticut State Police headquarters 
where the Rogues' Gallery file was 
inspected. After looking through hun- 
dreds of photographs, both Mr. and 



Mrs. Pola chose one photograph as 
having a very close resemblance to 
one of the robbers. 

The state police immediately sent a 
teletype message to our department 
requesting information concerning the 
present whereabouts of Julius F. Klein, 
the suspect. Reference to the Resident 
Known Criminal File in the Bureau of 
Criminal Identification indicated that 
Klein was living on East 189th Street 
in the Bronx. The Connecticut author- 
ities were so advised. 

Several days later, the Polas made 
a trip to New York in company with 
detectives of the Connecticut State 
Police for the purpose of viewing the 
suspect. Klein was picked up for 
questioning by members of our Detec- 
tive Division. At headquarters, he was 
left in a room with about a half dozen 
other men, and the Polas were able 
lo view the group without disclosing 
their presence. Both of them, in turn, 
definitely identified Klein as one of 
the men who had tied them up. At 
the request of the Connecticut author- 
ities, he was placed under arrest and 
held for extradition to Connecticut. 



SENDING. The enlarged fingerprints are placed on the cylinder of the photo transmitter, 

prior to sending to a distant city. 



Among the property found in Klein's 
possession was a small memorandum 
book. In it, the detectives from the 
state police recognized several names. 
Upon returning to Connecticut, John 
D. Sposi was one of the men they 
picked up for interrogation. It devel- 
oped that, although Sposi was not one 
of the actual gunmen, he had aided 
them in planning and carrying out the 
robbery. He assured the detectives 
that he only knew the third participant 
as "Ronnie." Klein's memorandum 
book supplied the name of Ronald P. 
Bleuler, also a New York City resident. 

The Connecticut police communi- 
cated with our detectives to learn 
whether the department could furnish 
any information on Bleuler. Our files 
disclosed that a man by that name 
lived on Findlay Avenue in the Bronx 
but that he had never been arrested 
for any crime requiring him to be 
photographed and fingerprinted. The 
state police once more made a trip to 
New York and this time they brought 
Sposi to observe several men who lived 
at the Bronx address with a view 
toward identifying the one known to 

THE CLARITY OF THE INKED PRINT 
(left), as it appeared on the finger- 
print form, is retained on the photo 




14 — 



him as "Ronnie." 

Lady Luck speeded up the eventual 
identification. While Sposi was in this 
city, our Bureau of Criminal Identifi- 
cation received the photograph and 
fingerprints of a man by the name of 
Bleuler who had just been brought 
back from Rye, New York, on the 
charge of stealing an automobile in 
Rockaway. The new photo was in- 
terspersed with many others and shown 
to Sposi. He picked out Bleuler's 
as being that of the "Ronnie" whom 
he knew. 

At this point, the photo transmitting 
device entered the case for the first 
time. At the request of the Connecti- 
cut detectives, Bleuler's photograph 
and a complete set of fingerprints were 
placed upon the machine. While these 
were being transmitted, the Polas were 
brought to the headquarters of the 
Connecticut State Police. Bleuler's 
photograph was placed in a special 
Rogues' Gallery display and the Polas 
quickly identified him as Klein's 
partner. 

In the meantime, other officers were 
closely examining the set of finger- 
prints which had also been received 
over the photo transmitting device. 
The officers had no difficulty in match- 
ing a latent fingerprint impression 
which had been found on the brick 
company's vault-box with one of Bleu- 
ler's prints. A warrant was imme- 
diately obtained for his arrest. The 
New York Police Department was re- 
quested to lodge it against him so that 
he might be held for the Connecticut 



authorities following the disposition of 
the grand larceny charge arising out 
of the auto theft. 

DESPITE the things that it can ac- 
complish, the photo transmitting 
device is not a large machine. It con- 
sists mainly of a revolving cylinder 
about 10 inches in length and of an 
electronic tube (photo-electric eye) 
which directs a narrow beam of light 
upon it. A flip of a switch converts 
it from a sending to a receiving ma- 
chine. In the process of sending, the 
beam of light scans the photograph 
which has been placed around the 
cylinder. In receiving, the beam of 
light reproduces the photograph upon 
a piece of sensitized photographic 
paper which has been set in place 
around the cylinder. 

The principle behind the transmis- 
sion of photos over regular telephone 
circuits is that energy is capable of 
being transformed from one medium 
to another medium. In other words, 
light may be converted into sound, 
and then, after having travelled the 
required distance, may be reconverted 
into light. When the device is in 
operation, a steady whistling noise may 
be heard. Actually, the whistle varies 
in loudness as the beam is interrupted 
by a synchronized mechanism at the 
rate of 1,800 times a second. The in- 
terrupted particles of light produce 
the tones which carry the various 
shadings of the photograph over the 
telephone lines as sound. 

The transmitting • device scans a 



photograph vertically rather than hor- 
izontally. This is so because the cylin- 
der revolves in front of the light source 
which is stationary. Each complete 
revolution of the cylinder reproduces 
a portion of the photograph equivalent 
to 1/ 96th of an inch in width. It, 
therefore, requires 96 revolutions of 
the cylinder to reproduce a section of 
the original photograph, one inch wide 
and up to eight inches in the other 
dimension. Ihis takes slightly more 
than a minute. Thus in about ten 
minutes, it is possible to transmit or 
receive a regular eight inch by ten 
inch photo. The resultant quality of 
the sound phoio compares very favor- 
ably with that of a regular service print. 

In the case of fingerprints, it has 
been found necessary to enlarge them 
"one and a half times" before placing 
them upon the transmitter. Then prior 
to starting the transmitter, the re- 
ceiving department is advised of the 
enlargement and instructed to reduce 
the fingerprints to normal size. This 
reduction provides in effect an image 
at 144 lines to the inch (one and a 
half times the usual 96), and it is re- 
ceived with such clarit}' that it does not 
interfere with the classification or ex- 
amination of the prints. The extent of 
this clarity may be appreciated when it 
is realized that leading magazines re- 
produce exceptionally fine photographs 
by means of a photo-engraving screen 
which has 120 lines to the inch. 

It has been mentioned that the actual 
transmission of an ordinary 8" by 10" 

(Continued on page 22; 



print (right). The photo print was 

enlarged for transmission and later 

reduced to normal. 



RECEIVING. After the finished prints are removed from the photo transmitter, they are 
developed in regular photographic solutions. 





15 



Commissioner Frank Returns To Old Post 




A unique distinction fell to Aaron Frank, (right) when he again 

received the badge of Third Deputy Police Commissioner from 

Commissioner George P. Monaghan. He had originally been 

appointed to the post on September 1, 1950. 

RE-SWORN as Third Depiitj' Police Commissioner on 
January 1, 1952, Aaron Frank came back to a post he 
had held since September 1, 1950. As trial commissioner 
he performs a difficult task, but his obvious itnpartiality 
has impressed accused and accuser alike. He has presided 
over more than 800 departmental trials. 

Admirably fitted and equipped for such a position, Com- 
missioner Frank is a New Yorker by birth, having been 
born on East 10th Street and raised in the East Harlem 
section of Manhattan. After completing Public School 83 
on 110th Street and De Witt Clinton High School, he 
matriculated at the School of Commerce of New York 
University, from which he received a B. C. S. degree with 
honors in June, 1922. Within a few years he became a 
Certified Public Accountant. He received his LL.B. with 
first honors in June, 1929, from New York Law School. 
Upon graduation he began teaching at that institution and 
now holds the chair of Professor of Law there. He has 
also taught at the St. John's University School of Com- 
merce. 

His practice has included extensive litigation and ap- 
pellate experience, in which he is considered an expert, as 
well as Surrogate's Court work and administrative and 
corporate law. He was a partner of the late Judge Charles 
J. McDermott of Kings County Court. One of his present 
partners is Henry C. Turner, former president of the Board 
pf Education and first chairman of the New ^'ork State 
Commission Against Discrimination. 

For ten years. Commissioner Frank served as a Trial 
Examiner for the New York State Labor Relations Board. 
He has done arbitration work by court appointment and as 
a member of the American Arbitration Association panel. 
He was a member of the Speaker's Bureau of the O.P.A. 
and during World War II was a government appeal agent 
in the Selective Service Sj'stem. He was also active in 
Civil Defense Work. Since becoming deputy commissioner 
he has spoken before many civilian groups on behalf of 
the Civil Defense Program. 

A resident of the Bronx for the last twenty-seven years, 
he was married in 1925. His wife, Estelle, has long' been 
active in the Bronx Motor Corps of the AWVS ai»d in 



volunteer work at the Memorial Hospital. Two children 
make up the reinainder of the family. Julian Andrew, 25, 
is now serving as an assistant U. S. Attorney for the 
Southern District of New York. A graduate of Washington 
and Lee University, he also attended New York Law 
School, where his relationship to his father was not dis- 
closed until the day of his graduation. A daughter, Barbara 
Doris, 21, is a senior at Skidmore College, majoring in 
psychology. 

The Commissioner belongs to the American Bar Associa- 
tion as well as the New York City, New York County and 
Bronx County Bar Associations, in the last of which he is 
a member of the Board of Directors. He is also a member 
of the New York State Society of CPA's, the Grand Street 
Boys, Mount Neboh Lodge 257, F. and A.M., the Police 
Square Club and the Shomrim Society. The Police Honor 
Legion also claims him as an honorary member. 

On November 13, 1951, he was signally honored for his 
services to the community by the American Jewish Com- 
mittee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, at 
a dinner held in the Concourse Plaza Hotel. 

Among his interests he lists good music with that of 
Brahms, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky being his favorites. 
A violinist himself, he has a particular interest in stringed 
instruments. His reading tastes lie in the field of history, 
biography and philosophy. He likes baseball, but having 
been raised a Giant fan, living now in the shadow of the 
Yankee Stadium and having supervision of police condi- 
tions in Brooklyn, he deems it best to root for all teams 
with equal fervor. 



VISITORS FROM CUBA 




CUBAN OFFICIALS included Police Headquarters as one of the 
points of interest on their recent visit to New York. SPRING 3100 
shares the spot light as Deputy Commissioner William Rowe 
and Police Commissioner Monaghan present several copies of 
the magazine to Minister of Arms Pedro Gutierrez and Com- 
missioner of Labor Elpidus Oliva Perez. 



16 — 



Pnm Tht 



Legal 
Bureau: 




LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

Two Recenf Decisions: Illegal Possession 

of Machine Gun — Evidence Seized 

Without Warrant 



* I 'he Court of Appeals on December 
A 6, 1951, rendered a decision in the 
case of People v. William Terra and 
Joseph Terra, the subject matter of 
which should be of interest to members 
of the Police Department. 

A machine gun and ammunition for 
it were found in a one room store 
occupied by the defendants in con- 
nection with their business of distribut- 
ing and servicing pin ball machines. 
They were accused of illegally pos- 
sessing a machine gun in violation of 
subdivision 1-a of Section 1897 of the 
Penal Law and were found guilty after 
trial. They sought a reversal upon the 
grounds that the jury was permitted to 
base its verdict on that portion of sub- 
division 1-a which provides that "the 
possession of such machine gun in any 
room, dwelling, structure or vehicle 
shall be presumptive evidence of its 
illegal possession by all the persons 
occupying the place where such ma- 
chine gun is found." The defendants 
contended that the statute, in so far 
as it creates a presumption, is un- 
constitutional. 

The Court of Appeals considered 
the constitutionality of this statute but 
only insofar as it related to the pre- 
sumption based upon occupancy of a 
room. In its decision, the Court dis- 
cussed the validity of statutes creating 
presumptions. It pointed out that for 
many years legislatures had been en- 
acting statutes which provided that 
certain facts, insufficient in themselves 
to justify a conviction, shall, when 
proved, constitute presumptive or 
prima facie evidence of the existence 
of the principal fact in issue. Un- 
questionably, the Court admitted, such 
provisions facilitate proof of guilt and 
the task of the prosecution. But they 
are not for that reason to be con- 
demned. However, the presumption 
provided by statute does not relieve the 
prosecution of its burden of proving 
the defendant giiilty beyond a reason- 
able doubt. And since a defendant is 
presumed to be innocent until the 
contrary is proved, due process de- 
mands the introduction of some evi- 
dence which tends to prove the ele- 
ments of the crime charged, before a 
verdict is rendered against the defend- 
ant. 



Sinister Significance 

The validity of a presumption-sta- 
tute depends upon whether, based on 
life and life's experiences, a rational 
connection between the fact proved 
and the ultimate fact presumed may 
be said to exist. The fact upon which 
the presumption is to rest must have 
some fair relation to, or natural con- 
nection with, the main fact. Experience 
must teach that the evidence held to 
be inculpatory has at least a "sinister 
significance." 

The Court sustained the constitu- 
tionality of the statute and affirmed the 
conviction of the defendants. The 
Court found that there could be no 
doubt about the "sinister significance" 
of proof of a machine gun in a room 
occupied by an accused. It also uphekl 
the reasonableness of the connection 
between its illegal possession and oc- 
cupancy of the room where it is kept. 
The present context of the statutor\- 
term "occupying" applies to those 
persons who either reside in the room 
or use it in the conduct and operation 
of a business or other venture. Thev 
normally know what is in it ; and 
certainly when the object is as large 
and uncommon as a machine gun, it 
is neither unreasonable nor unfair to 
presume that the room's occupants are 
aware of its presence. That being so, 
the Legislature may not be considered 
arbitrary if it acts upon the presumjj- 
tion and erects it into evidence of a 
possession that is "conscious" and 
"knowing." 

The Supreme Court of the United 
States, Hawes v. Georgia, 258 U. S. 1, 
has upheld the validity of a statute 
providing that the existence of a liquor 
still upon "real estate" constitutes 
prima facie evidence that those "in 
actual possession" of the land know of 
the location of the still and may, on the 
strength of that presumption, be held 
guilty of the crime of permitting a still 
to be operated upon their property. In 
this state, the Court of Appeals has 
upheld the constitutionality of Section 
1898-a of the Penal Law, which pro- 
vides that the "presence in an auto- 
mobile" of any gun or other designated 
weapon "shall be presumptive e\ndence 
of its illegal possession by all the 



persons ... in such automobile at the 
time such weapon ... is found." If 
such statutes are constitutional — one 
presuming knowledge of a still from 
possession of perhaps a large area of 
land and the other presuming posses- 
sion of a gun from mere presence in 
an automobile — then certainly, a pro- 
vision declaring possession of a gun 
inferable from occupancy of the room 
where it is found, is reasonable and 
valid. 

Except for law enforcement officials 
and the few other groups expressly 
exempted from the application of sub- 
division 1-a of Section 1897, a machine 
gun is never permissible equipment or 
standard stock in trade of any legiti- 
mate business or profession. Rarely, if 
ever, is its possessor either law-abiding 
or engaged upon a lawful task. If, 
therefore, it is reasonable to presume 
possession of a machine gun from 
evidence that defendants were occupy- 
ing the room in which it was kept, it 
follows almost as matter of course that 
it is rational further to infer an illegal 
possession, since a machine gun is 
property not likely to be found in the 
possession of innocent parties. 

The statute here places no oppres- 
sive burden upon an accused. It gives 
him every opportunity to rebut the 
presumption, merely calling upon him 
to -explain the highly sinister and 
suspicious proof that a machine gun 
was found in a room occupied bv him. 
And, even if he offers no explanation, 
the jury may still refuse to convict. 
The burden of proof upon the entire 
case, the duty of establishing guilt 
beyond a reasonable doubt, remains as 
ever with the prosecution. The defend- 
ant is still entitled to the presumption 
of irmocence. 

EvicJence Obtained Without Authority 

In a recent case, Stefanelli v. Min- 
ard, 72 Sup. Ct. Reporter 118, the 
petitioners sought relief from the 
federal courts to prevent the fruit of 
an unlawful search by New Jersey 
police from being used in evidence in 
a state criminal trial. It appeared that 
Newark police officers entered peti- 
tioners' homes without legal authority, 
seized property useful in bookmaking, 
and arrested the petitioners. The peti- 
tioners alleged that the seized propertv 
is destined for evidence against them 
in the New Jersey criminal proceed- 
ings. 

The Supreme Court of the LTnited 
States held that federal courts could 
not intervene in state criminal pro- 
ceedings to suppress the use of evi- 
dence even when claimed to have been 

(Continued on page 18) 



— 17- 



P.D 



RETIRED 



P.D 



The following retirement applications were approved by the 
Board of Trusteees of the Pension Fund at its meeting of 
December 17: 

Date 
Appointed 

INSPECTOR 

Aug. 15, 1915 

CAPTAIN 



Nan 



Daniel Gallagher 



Command 



4th Div. 



Stanley J. Jiroudek 


Dec. 


29, 


1906 


122nd Pet. 




LIEUTENANTS 




James McDade 


Dec. 


28, 


1906 


85th Pet. 


William J. Ferrick 


July 


1, 


1908 


87th Pet. 


Gustave R. Mauch 


Sept. 


2, 


1913 


Traf. R. 


Henry T. Duncan 


Aug. 


26, 


1913 


Off. of 4th D.P.C. 




SERGEANTS 




Patrick Kelly 


Nov. 


20, 


1913 


25th Pet. 


Joseph A. Wylie 


May 


29, 


1911 


50th Pet. 


Michael J. Cunningham Dec. 


1, 


1913 


80th Pet. 


Francis B. Casey 


Nov. 


7, 


1911 


81st Pet. 


John J. McCamley 


Feb. 


16, 


1909 


Mtd. Sqd. 2 


Richard F. McCarthy 


Feb. 


20, 


1928 


46th Pet. 


John J. Herbst 


Dec. 


31, 


1937 


22nd Pet. 


Paul F. Roschke 


Jan. 


17, 


1927 


E.S.D. 




PATROLMEN 




Edward F. Straub 


Oct. 




1931 


3rd Pet. 


Paul J. De Biasi 


Dec. 




1931 


62nd Pet. 


Joseph J. Leyes 


Dec. 




1931 


69th Pet. 


Harold Roder 


Dec. 




1931 


84th Pet. 


Joseph E. Parker 


Dec. 




1931 


34th Pet. 


Edward J. Bransfield 


June 


^o', 


1912 


D.D., Man. W. 


James P. Rossel 


Dec. 




1931 


64th Pet 


Jomes T. Cowan 


Dec. 




1931 


110th Pet. 


Leo A. Madden 


Dec. 




1931 


21st D.D. 


Vincent S. DeMasi 


Dec. 




1931 


61st Pet. 


Vincent Capobianco 


Dec. 




1931 


46th Pet. 


Louis Schwartz 


Dec. 




1931 


77th Pet. 


Benjamin Rosenberg 


Dec. 




1931 


41st Pet. 


Maurice J. Dobson 


Sept. 


8, 


1913 


D.D., Bklyn. W. 


John Boylan 


June 


28, 


1911 


7th Pet. 


Harry Cohen 


June 


27, 


1911 


8th Pet. 


Andrew J. Conlin 


May 


23, 


1905 


42nd Pet 


William Reifel 


Nov. 


18, 


1906 


42nd Pet 


Charles E. Schultz 


Jan. 


18, 


1908 


85th Pet. 


William J. Walsh 


July 


29, 


1909 


85th Pet. 


Joseph Pessolano 


Mar. 


22, 


1909 


120th Pet 


Edward J. Brennan 


July 


28, 


1906 


Traf. B 


William F. Cox 


June 


10, 


1911 


Hq. Div. 


Alexander P. Stanton 


Dec. 


30, 


1910 


D.D., Bklyn. W. 


Charles J. Brown 


Sept. 


23, 


1910 


OFF. of 4th D.P.C. 


James P Trumble 


June 


25, 


1931 


22nd D D. 


John Sheridan 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


23rd D.D. 


Anthony J. Esposito 


Mar. 


28, 


1930 


94th Pet. 


James J. McMahon 


July 


10, 


1922 


104th Pet. 


Herbert E. Sterger 


June 


2, 


1926 


74th Pet. 


Vito Romano 


Dec. 


3, 


1928 


103rd Pet. 


Robert T. Mulvihill 


Sept. 


25, 


1930 


48th Pet. 


William A. O'Rourke 


July 


7, 


1924 


40th Pet. 


James Dargan 


April 


5, 


1918 


79th Pet. 



Jan. 


17, 


1923 


67th Pet. 


July 


1, 


1938 


76th Pet. 


June 


16, 


1926 


76th Pet. 


Jan. 


11, 


1927 


Mtd. Sqd. 1 


June 


2, 


1926 


D D., Man. W. 


Mar. 


6, 


1925 


CD. 



George L. Berg 
Philip Simms 
Alexander Wierzbicki 
William J. Nolan 
John J. Dust, Jr. 
William H. Colby 



LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

(Continued from page J7J 

Mxiiitil li\' unlaw lul search and seizure. 

In \ii\\ of the abuve, il niij^ht be well to suniiiiarize the 
rules rej^ardiiig the aihiiissibility of evidence seized with- 
out a search warrant. 

A state court may allow evidence to be used in a state 
prosecution even though such evidence was secured through 
an illegal search and seizure. 

A federal court will not admit into evidence at a federal 
|)ro.secuti(jn any property seized unlawfully by federal 
officers. Evidence seized by state officers unlawfull)' and 
turned over to federal officers for a prosecution in a federal 
court is admissible. 

However, if the evidence is .seized unlawfully hv a state 
officer at the direction of a federal officer, then it is in- 
admissible in a federal court. 



This material was prepared by Louis L. Stutman of the 
Legal Bureau. 



TIMES SQUARE PATROL 

[Continued from page 5 

For girls under 16, arrested or "wanted" on a court 
warrant: 

( iirls' Camp on Welfare Island. 
For girls between 16 and 21 detained on a warrant issued 
by Girls' Term Court: 

liuphrasian Residence — i37 East 17th Street, or — 

House of Detention — Sixth and Greenwich Avenues, 

if obstreperous behavior warrants confinement. 
For girls between 16 and 21 arrested for a crime: 

Kr^ul.ir polu'e dilrntiim. 
For shelter for girls and boys under 16: 

riiildrrn's Slulter _' I.lsI lO.^lh Street. 
For shelter for girls between 16 and 21: 

luiplirasian kesidiiui — 3,i7 I'.ast 17th -Street. 
For shelter for boys between 16 and 21: 

llnnie for 1 lonulrNs I'lONs 4t>2 l-'.ast l.^Sth .'-^l., llronx. 
For boys under 16, arrested or "wanted" on a warrant: 

Ndulli Mouse .\^1 l-.asl lith Street. 
For boys over 16, arrested or "wanted" on a warrant. 

Regular jiolice detention. 

Tl 1 1-. Times ."^iiuare .Sciuad through its efficient patrolling 
contributes its share in making more effective the work 
of the Jiuenile .Aid Bureau. Many cases which it picks up 
are sulisequently brought to the attention of appropriate 
servicing agencies. Hence, not only is the police function of 
deterring crime and delinquency being fulfilled but these 
youths are being set upon the path of rehabilitation that 
leads U) useful citizenship. 



18- 




The Retired Ring In 




James M. Callahan, formerly of 
Traffic F, is now living in Victor, 
Iowa, where he is the National Adjutant 
for the Army & Navy Union. He was 
visited recently by Edward T. Lari- 
mer, formerly of the 22nd Pet., who 
now gets his mail in Elizabcthton, 
Tennessee. Larimer and his wife were 
on an extended tour of the United 
States and stopped off to reminisce 
about old times and the department. 
Picture shows the two buddies taking 
it easy. . . . SPRING 3100 has a note 
from William Hilgeman, who re- 
tired in 1937 from the 14th Precinct. 
Hilgeman asks that we print the 
names and addresses of all retired 
men so that they can keep in touch 
with each other. We wish we could 
but space does not permit us to list the 
thousands of names and addresses. 
However, if you have any news or 
interesting pictures about retired men. 
send them along and SPRING 3100 
will be happy to publish them. . . . 

Charles Huber, 18th Precinct, and 
Patsy Meiinella, 75th Precinct, are 
now keeping the peace on the sands 
of Saudi Arabia. Both men signed up 
for a two year hitch to do police work 
in the oil fields where they will be 
protecting the lives of 2,500 company 
employees. They'll meet several other 
former policemen who are now work- 
ing there. . . . When the postmaster 
rings in Bayville, Long Island, it will 
be none other than former Patrolman 



James A. Nicholson, who used to 
patrol in Flushing until his retirement 
in 1939. He is now the acting post- 
master of that Long Island community. 
. . . Patrolman Edward Lane, who 
retired in 1947, is now living in Lake- 
land, Florida. Ed has been elected 
president of the Country Club Estates 
Association which is sparking a pro- 
gram devoted to the young people of 
the community. With three children 
of his own, it is easy to understand 
Lane's interest in the program. . . . 
Dover, New Hampshire claims Ed 
Ritterbusch as a new resident. Ed. 
formerly of the Automobile Squad, 
is head of the security force for an 
industrial firm. He brings to his new 
job a background of 32 years of service 
with the New York City Police De- 
partment. . . . Sergeant Andries F. 
Geyer, Traffic J, retired on January 
28, 1951, and on the following day. 
sailed for a %dsit to the "old country" 
— in this instance, South Africa. Al- 
though New York policemen come 
from all over the world. Sergeant 
Geyer was one of the few who claimed 
the "Dark Continent" as their birth- 
place. He returned to the L^nited States 
at the end of August. . . . Frank 
Roth, who retired in 1949, is now 
living in Mar\'land, New York. He's 
proud of his son Robert, who is now 
a member of the Air Forces and who 
prior to his enlistment was an out- 
standing athlete at Cobleskill College. 



(Left) Thebsy Feitenstein, Warrant Squad Brooklyn, Arthur O'Neil, 63rd Precinct, and 
John Faulkner, 60th Precinct, all residing in Florida, send their best to their buddies 
in the department. Left to right: Lt. John Burke, N.Y.F.D.; Feitenstein; O'Neil; Monte 
Ross, N.Y.F.D.; Edward Weisbaum, Chicago P.D.; and Faulkner. (Right) James M. Calla- 
han and Edward T. Larimer take it easy at the former's home in Victor, Iowa. 






Retired Patrolman and Mrs. Pious Kaz- 
lauskas celebrated their twenty-fifth wed- 
ding anniversary recently. PtI. Kaslauskas 
is well remembered for his role as "Pete 
the Tramp" by the youngsters whom he 
entertained at outings sponsored by the 
Anchor Club and the PAL. Pious was 
formerly attached to Traffic "I." 

Retired Sgt. Andrew F. Geyer, known as 
"Big Andy" returned to his native coun- 
try for a visit after his retirement. Here 
he stands with two constables in South 
Africa. Constable on left is 6' 7" tall, 
constable on right is 6' 8" tall, while 
Sgt. Geyer is a mere 6' 5 '. 




— 19 — 




The Old Forty-Niner 
Digs For The Story 



From: The Old Forty-Niner. 

To: You. 

Subject: SERGEANT WILLIAM B. VALKOFF — GOOD SAMARITAN. 

In his meanderings around the department, the Old Forty-Niner comes across 
many a good story. Often it is found between the lines of the reams of copy that 
passes through the office of SPRING 3100. Many times his attention is called to 
it by a third party, either in or outside the bluecoat family. One such that 
he heard about recently sounded like a natural, so off he went on a digging 
expedition. 

What attracted him to this particular yarn, and what intrigued him all the 
more after he began uncovering the facts, was not only that it was different, 
but that the unselfishness and kindness involved were rare in this day when 
everybody, it seems, is looking out for Number 1. It didn't take much deciding 
on the part of the old prospector to try to learn the facts behind the story so 
that all could read and take pride in it. 

"My first stop" thought the Old Forty-Niner, "will be the New York City 
Cancer Committee." The next day he found himself talking to Mrs. G. K. OXHOLM, 
director of Voluntary Services of the committee. "I understand," he said after 
he had introduced himself, "that a sergeant in our department on his off-time 
is one of your volunteer drivers, and I wondered if you could give me some 
further information about him." 

Mrs. Oxholm took it from there. "Oh, you mean Sergeant William B. Valkoff 
of the 109th Precinct," she said. "Not only is he one of our drivers, as you 
put it, but he is one of the most faithful and dependable volunteers we have. 
He has been with us a long time, and frankly, I don't know how we could get along 
without him. " 

When the Old Forty-Niner explained to Mrs. Oxholm that he hoped to do an 
article about Sergeant Valkoff for the department magazine, she beamed: "Well, 
you couldn't find a more worthy subject and, while you're about it, we would be 
ever so thankful if you would point out that we have an ever-growing need for 

(Continued on page 22' 




Errand of Mercy 

Sergeant William B. ValkofF, at the 
wheel of a New York City Cancer Com- 
mittee station wagon-ambulance, receives 
his assignment from Director of Voluntary 
Services Mrs. G. K. Oxholm. 



20 



SICK CASE 

PATKOLMAN JoHN Kelly finished his meal, glanced at 
his watch, noted that he still had some fifteen minutes 
left to his meal period, and picked up a newspaper 
which Joe, the restaurant owner, had left nearby. 

The previous day had been a particularly hectic one and 
Kelly avidly read all the details of how two radio motor 
patrolmen had cornered a stick-up man, and how a detec- 
tive had shot it out and won against a killer. 

Kelly, noting the time, put down the paper, sighed, paid 
his check and left the restaurant. Back on post, his mind 
dwelt on what he had read. Well, he thought, some day 
his chance would come and he too would be in the news. 
Kelly squared his shoulders as he walked along. Being out 
of the Police Academy for only two weeks, he could afford 
to wait. 

As he rounded the corner of Morris and Main, a woman 
coming down the steps of 523 Main spied him. "Officer! 
Officer !" she cried. Kelly was instantly alert, ready to rush 
to the aid of distressed femininity. 

"What is it. Madam?" 

"It's Mrs. Mancuso, she's, she's — . Oh, please get a 
doctor!" Swift comprehension came to Kelly. 

"What floor does she live on ?" 

"First floor front." 

"Is her husband with her?" 

"No, he works in the bakery at Main and Norfolk." 

"O.K.", Kelly said, "you go down and tell him : I'll take 
care of things here." 

A call box was nearby and Kelly's long legs carried him 
to it in a matter of seconds. His crisp, business-like voice 
informed the T.S. Operator, Hansen, that he wanted an 
ambulance sent to 523 Main Street immediately — Maternity 
Case. 

KELLY hung up and walked rapidly back to 523 Main. 
He bounded up the stoop and entered the first floor 
front apartment. A dim light burning in the bedroom dis- 
closed the patient to Kelly. She was strangely silent, but 
Kelly, noting the rising and falling of the bed covers, 
knew that she was alive. 

"Probably passed out," he murmured to himself. Kelly 
heard a car stop outside. A white coated attendant appeared 
in the doorwav. 

"Right here," said Kelly. 

"O.K.," the attendant said and nodded to the driver who 
had brought a stretcher with him. 

"Say, officer, give me a hand will you?" the driver asked, 

"Sure," said Kelly. 

The attendant bent to examine the figure on the bed and 
the woman suddenlv opened her eyes. Horror and dis- 
belief were etched on her face. She sat upright in bed and 
commenced to scream in a tongue that was utterly foreign 
to Kelly. 

"Delirious too," said the attendant. 

Kelly and the driver, struggling manfully, forced the 
woman onto the stretcher and into the waiting ambulance. 
Much battered. Patrolman Kelly and his confederates ar- 
rived at the hospital amidst a chorus of shrieks, groans 
and what-mav-have-been curses from the ungrateful pas- 
.senger. The woman was placed onto a waiting table and 
wheeled into the Emergency Ward. Shortly afterward the 
wail of a baby was heard from the depths of the ward. 
Kelly smiled to himself. He thought, "this might even hit 
the papers." In his mind's eye he saw headlines. "Cop 
races stork," and sighed to himself. 




Det. A. J. BRICKLEY, 
68th Squad. 



Suddenly his attention was attracted by the woman who 
had first summoned him. He approached her and said, 
"Well, Madam, I guess everything is all right now." 

"Oh, Officer, I'm so glad to see you. I wanted to explain." 

"Explain what?" 

"Why we didn't wait for the ambulance. You see Mr. 
Mancuso had his car and when I told him, — why, he and 
I just took her to the hospital ourselves." 

"I don't understand," Kelly managed to gasp. "We took 
Mrs. Mancuso out of 523 Main Street." 

"But she lives at 525." the woman explained, giving 
Kelly a puzzled glance. 

"But you came out of 523," Kelly croaked. 

"Yes, I live there. You see Mrs. Mancuso phoned me 
and I was hurrving over to her, when I met you." 

Kelly turned' and with bowed head and leaden legs 
walked to the now turbulent accident room. As he entered, 
the attendant walked over to him and whispered. "Why 
did vou have this woman brought here. Officer? She isn't 
sick." 

"T know." said Kelly, "hut I am!" 

TitF strident note of the alarm clock roused Kelly. He 
reached over, shut it oiif and drew himself to a sitting 
position on the edge of the bed. His wife, Mary, opened 
one eye and said. "John. T hate to hear that alarm clock 
go off in the morning." 

Kellv rubbed his hand over his chin and said.^ "This 
is one morning T didn't mind hearing it at all. Xo, not 
at all." 



— 21 — 



Fingerprints By Telephone 



(Continued from page 15) 



l)hotograph requires a little more than 
ten minutes. In actual operation, the 
overall time is about double this. From 
the time that the telephone coimection 
with the distant city is requested, 
several things must be done. It is 
necessary for the transmitting and re- 
ceiving speed photo operators to syn- 
chronize the operation of their sets ; 
and after the photo has been trans- 
mitted, for the receiving operator to 
develop the print in the normal photo- 
graphic solutions. Then he notifies the 
sender as to the results of the trans- 
mission. This requires an overall time 
spread of about twenty minutes. 

The distance over which the photo- 
graph is transmitted has no bearing 
upon the transmission time element. 
However, from the moment that the 
telephone connection is made until the 
receiver acknowledges the reception 
of a perfect reproduction, the tele- 
phone circuit is left open. Under the 
circumstances, a method of reciprocity 
has been established whereby the police 
department which requests the infor- 
mation agrees to pay the telephone 
charges. In the Hartford holdup case, 
the charges were reversed to the Con- 
necticut State Police. 

AT the present time, it is possible 
for our department to interchange 
criminal fingerprints and photographs 
with the following police agencies : 

Boston Police Department 

California State Bureau of Criminal 

Identification 
Chicago Police Department 
City of Miami Police Department 
Columbus (Ohio) Police Department 
Connecticut State Police 
Corpus Christi (Texas) Police Depart- 
ment 
Dallas Police Department 
Detroit Police Department 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (Wash- 
ington, D. C.) 
Houston Police Department 
Nassau County Police Department 
Newark Police Department 
New Orleans Police Department 
New York State Police (Albany) 
Philadelphia Police Department 
Seattle Police Department 
St. Louis (Missouri) Police Department 
St. Paul Police Department 
Texas Department of Public Safety 
Toledo Police Department 
Tulsa Police Department 

Because of the relatively high cost 
of this method of communication, cer- 
tain restrictions have been established 



Form designed by the Photo- 
graphic Bureau to transmit all 
ten fingerprints at the same 
time. Originally, fingerprints 
were enlarged twice their nor- 
mal size and this required two 
transmissions. Enlargement to 
one and a half times normal 
size together with the new form 
achieves the same results. 



by this dep.irlincnl to assure 
that it is used only when 
absolutely necessary. Members of tin- 
Detective Division who wish to utilize 
the services of the transmitter are re- 
quired to obtain the approval of their 
borough commander. The latter then 
requests the Commanding Officer, 
Photographic Bureau through the Cor- 
respondence Bureau to make the trans- 
mission. 



' I(.(l« Ihi.ml. 


: II In,,,. 1 , 


t H M.I 11, 1,,,,,. 


, 1< K,,.. („.<.. \ 






,.,,.,, , , ,, ,.,,, 








fKiUCE OEPAWTWENT | 


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i 




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SPRING 3100 acknowledges the 
assistance received in the prepara- 
tion of this article from Acting 
Captain H. Conrad Lueck of the 
Photographic Bureau, and Detec- 
tive Harry Fritz of the 17th Detec- 
tive Squad. 



The Old Forty-Niner 



(Continued font page 20} 

more volunteers. "You see," she stated, 
"cancer is such a costly burden, that 
many sufferers who are economically 
independent and therefore ineligible 
for public assistance, are unable to bear 
the many additional expenses that ac- 
company long illnesses. It is these 
victims whom our volunteers serve." 

"That's a real storv all right," said 
the Old Forty-Niner' "We'll be only 
too glad to give it some .space in 
SPRING .-^100." Before taking his 
leave, he arranged with Mrs. Oxholm 
to get a picture of Sergeant Valkofl' 
the next time the sergeant was sched- 
uled for one of his voluntarv assign- 
ments. 

A couple of days later the OKI 
Forty-Niner cornered Sergeant Val- 
koff in the far reaches nf Flushing. 
Upon learning what was in the wind, 
the sergeant wanted to know how he 
got hold of his information. 

"P^a.sy Sarge," chuckled the grizzled 
old-timer," you wouldn't want me to 
choke off a good source of news, would 
you? I'd just like to get vour side of 
this story. T think the ])eo])le in our 
department would like to hear it." 

"Well," said Sergeant \'alkoff, 
"there's really not much to tell. 1 
don't feel that I'm doing any more than 
a lot of fellows would do if they knew 
about it. I fit my volunteer driving in 
between niv tours and I'm glad to be 
able to help the unfortunate people 



involved. Our volunteers come from all 
walks of life and spend what free time 
they can in aiding these cancer suffer- 
ers by driving them for treatment 
between their homes and the clinics 
and hospitals in Manhattan and the 
Bronx. The New York City Cancer 
Committee has four station wagons 
which we drive. The hours of service 
are from 9 AM to 12 Noon and from 
12:30 PM to 4:30 PM, Monday 
through Friday. I give them whatever 
time I can, depending on what set of 
tours T am working. All we do is 
drive; we are not expected to lift or 
carry patients." 

The Old Forty-Niner asked the 
sergeant just how a prospective volun- 
teer would go about offering his ser\ - 
ices. "Anyone on the force can get in 
touch with me and I'll tell them all 1 
can, or if thev prefer, thev can contact 
Mrs. Oxholm at Plaza 0-3300," 
answered Sergeant Valkoff. "It's as 
simple as that. They'll be mighty 
welcome, too," he added. 

Thanking the sergeant for his help, 
the Old l"(irty-Niner began the long 
trek hack to the office. As he trudged 
along, he couldn't help but. think about 
all the "Sergeant Valkoffs" who ex- 
emplified the kindness and human 
.svmpathy to be found among so many 
imsung New York hluccoats. and he 
found him.self hoping that his story 
might move others to take an active 
hand in such a noble work of mercj\ 



22 — 



STUDY 



POLICE ACADEMY C,. 




HALL 



FEBRUARY, 1952 



QUESTION NO. 1 

What department units supervise and direct the patrol- 
wagon service? 

QUESTION NO. 2 

In what department unit will a Force Record File of the 
entire department be maintained? 

QUESTION NO. 3 

To what information on the CD. 17 will members of 
the department assigned to switchboard duty call the 
attention of their commanding officer? 

QUESTION NO. 4 

Where, and by whom, will the entry concerning a com- 
manding officer telephoning from a signal box be made? 

QUESTION NO. 5 

Who may make entries in the Telephone Record of a 
precinct ? 

QUESTION NO. 6 

Who will make entries in the Telephone Record of com- 
mands other than precincts ? 

QUESTION NO. 7 

a. Will the time of sending, or the time of completion, 
be considered as the time of a telephone message? 

b. Who states the time? 

QUESTION NO. 8 

Whose name will be entered in a precinct Telephone 
Record as being the name of the person who sent or re- 
ceived a message? 

QUESTION NO. 9 

What county official will be called by the communications 
bureau upon notification by a desk officer that a person 
has died with no known next of kin, and property is 
involved? 

QUESTION NO. 10 

In what manner will the number of radio motor patrol 
sectors in a precinct be determined? 

QUESTION NO. 11 

How many words per miimte is the normal dispatch rate 



for the operation of two-way radio sets? 

QUESTION NO. 12 

What is the minimum period of time that shall separate 
the meal periods of an operator and recorder assigned to a 
radio motor patrol car? 

QUESTION NO. 13 

Select the correct choice : 

Meal periods for members assigned to radio motor patrol 

cars shall be so scheduled that not more than of the 

radio motor patrol cars on patrol in a precinct will have a 
tnember of the crew on meal at one time. 

(A)>4;(B)/3;(C)/2;(D)^. 

QUESTION NO. 14 

What directions will a desk officer give the patrolman 
assigned to a radio motor patrol car at the termination of 
his meal period when such car has been detained on official 
business ? 



eneral alarm sheets be forwarded to 



QUESTION NO. 15 

How often shall 5,^..^.... „ ^..^^.^ „^ .„ 

patrol precincts and precinct detective squads? 

QUESTION NO. 16 

Select the correct choice: 

Teletype Code Signal means emergency calls for 

all. (A) 11; (B) 19; (C) 3; (D) 5. 

QUESTION NO. 17 

The "City Magistrates and Domestic Relations Courts" 
charts shall be displayed in the office of all division, district 
and borough headquarters commands. Where else shall it 
be conspicuously displayed in the station house? 

QUESTION NO. 18 

The Deputy Police Commissioner has superv'ision 

of police conditions and gambling conditions in the Bronx 
and supervision of P.A.L. and J.A.B. 

QUESTION NO. 19 

During the absence or disability of the Police Commis- 
sioner, the ranking D.P.C. in the order of numerical im- 
portance shall possess all the powers and perform all the 
duties of the P.C. except 



The questions and answers in this section were prepared by Lieutenant Sanford D. Garelik, Police Academy. 
This material is restricted and cannot be used in other publications without the permission of the Editor. 



— 23 — 



Study Hall Answers 



ANSWER NO. 1 

Comiminications bureau in each borough. 

(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 11) 

ANSWER NO. 2 

Chief Clerk's Office. 

I .A.uth : Article 6, Paragraph 9) 

ANSWER NO. 3 

Out-of-city telephone calls. 

(Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 14B, Subdivi- 
sion d.) 

ANSWER NO. 4 

By desk officer in the Blotter. 

(Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 22, Subdivi- 
sion e.) 

ANSWER NO. 5 

Desk officer on duty only. 

(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 24) 

ANSWER NO. 6 

As directed by the commanding officer. 

(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 24) 

ANSWER NO. 7 

a. Time of completion ; b. The sender. 

(Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 24, Subdivi- 
sion a.) 

ANSWER NO. 8 

In any Telephone Record, the name of the person 
actually receiving or transmitting a message and none other. 
(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 24, Subdivi- 
sion d. ) 

ANSWER NO. 9 

The Public Administrator. 

(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 26, Page 70) 

ANSWER NO. 10 

By the number of radio motor patrol cars assigned to 
the precinct. 

(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 44) 

ANSWER NO. 11 

Between 40 and 60 words per minute. 

(Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 52, Subdivi- 
sion a.) 

ANSWER NO. 12 

One half hour. 

(Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 70) 



ANSWER NO. 13 

C. (Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 70) 

ANSWER NO. 14 

( 1 ) To patrol in the vicinity of the meal location until 
return of the car, or (2) if convenient, report to the location 
where the car is detained. 

(Auth: Article 6, Paragraph 70) 

ANSWER NO. 15 

Daily. (Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 93) 

ANSWER NO. 16 

D. (Auth : Article 6, Paragraph 105 ) 

ANSWER NO. 17 

(1) Convenient to desk; (2) Sitting room. 
fAuth: Article 10, Paragraph 1) 

ANSWER NO. 18 

Sixth. (Auth : Article 11, Paragraph 6) 

ANSWER NO. 19 

Power of making appointments and transfers. 
(Auth: Rule 4) 



I 



PROMOTION COURSE 

Preparaiion for 

Sergeant — Lieutenant — Captain 

Monday 7:30 P.M. 

Tuesday 10:30 A.M. 

Wednesday 5:30 P.M. 

Thursday 11:30 A.M. 

Friday 5:30 P.M. 

(No session on holidays) 

at 

Officers' Training Scool 

7 Hubert Street, Manhattan 
(One-half block from Hudson Street) 

Transportation 

independent Subway System— Canal Street Station 

I.R.T. System, 7th Ave. Line— Canal or Franklin 
Street Stations 

I.R.T. System, Lexington Ave. Line — Canal and 
Lafayette Station 

B.M.T. System— Canal and Broadway Station 

Topics will be changed weekly. Each class ses- 
sion will be for a period of two hours. Afiendance 
will be on time off duty. No fee will be charged. 



24 — 





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— 28 — 



l^ctifh the //he 



News About Police Department Organizations 



PBA Backs Mayor's Tax Program 

Pres. Carton Addresses Joint PBA-UFA Conclave 




N. Y. Times Photo 

PRESIDENT JOHN CARTON of the PBA addresses joint membership meeting of police 
and firemen, called to discuss methods of obtaining salary increases. 



JOHN Carton, president of the Patrol- 
men's Benevolent Association urged 
the leaders of both major political 
parties to support Mayor Impellitteri's 
program of increased taxes. Pointing 
out that increased taxes ■ will furnish 
the revenue needed for salary raises, 
the PBA said, "Consequences for the 
inability of the city to meet its finan- 
cial responsibilities to police could 
easily result in chaos so widespread 
that any belated effort to remedy the 
situation would be ineffective." The 
program of the PBA also backs the 
Mayor's request for additional revenue 
from the state. PBA salary increases 
call for a thirty per cent increase with 
the present $250 cost of living bonus 



to be made permanent so that the 
annual retirement allowance would be 
increased by $125 per year. 

THE CAPTAINS' ASSOCIATION held a 
luncheon at the Park Sheraton Hotel 
on January 10 at which the new board 
of officers was installed. The follow- 
ing were elected to office : 

John Wynne President 

Philip Walsh 1st Vice-Pres. 

John J. Jones 2nd Vice-Pres. 

William G. Schnabel Sec.-Treas. 

William Reilly Sgt.-at-Arms 

THE LIEUTENANTS' ASSOCIATION an- 
nounces that its program for 1952 will 
include the following : 



I. Salary Adjustments. 

A. Salary increments up to $500. 
for lieutenants. 

B. A thirty per cent salary increase 
for all ranks. 

C. Adoption of the accepted for- 
mula of further salary adjust- 
ments based on a cost of living 
index as published by the U. S. 
Department of Labor. 

II. Widows' Pensions. 

Widows' pensions to consist of 
not less than one-quarter of the 
annual salary the member was 
receiving at the time of his death 
or retirement. 

III. Pension Increments (Article 1.) 
The annual pension increments 
for each year of sen^ice beyond 
the elected option (20 or 25 
years) shall not be less than 2% 
of his annual salary (instead of 
the present $50. per year). 

THE POLICEWOMEN'S ENDOWMENT 
ASSOCIATION installed its new board 
of officers at a dinner held on January 
22. The following will serve the as- 
sociation for 1952 : 

Theresa Scagnelli President 

Adelaide Knowles Vice-Pres. 

Virginia Howard Record. Secty. 

Stephanie Horvath Corr. Secty. 

Morrice Baer Treasurer 

Felicia Shpritzer _ Sgt.-at-Arms 

Helen SullivarL_Legislative Chrm. 

Grace Kuhls Research Chrm. 

Rosemary Patrissi 

Grievance Chrm. 

Leona Schuchardt 

Membership Chrm. 

THE CIVILIAN COUNCIL installed its 
new board of officers on January 24, 
at which time re-elected President 
Walter J. Drechsler announced the 
council's program for 1952. It will 
urge that all vacancies be filled to in- 
sure continued efficiency of the depart- 
ment; more promotion opportunities 
be created to reward faithful employ- 
ees ; salaries be increased to meet the 
ever increasing cost of living. 

THE ST. GEORGE ASSOCIATION will 

hold its next meeting on Thursday 
evening, February 7 at the Masonic 

(Continued on page 30) 



— 29 — 



Down the Line 

iContinued} 

Building. As his first job, the new 
president, Wilham Klingenbeck is 
beginning preparations for the annual 
communion breakfast to be iield on 
Sunday, April 20 at St. Thomas 
Church. The new board of ofificers was 
sworn in at the January meeting with 
the Honorable Gustav W. M. Wie- 
boldt, acting as installing officer, as- 
sisted by Captains \\'illiani Lawrence 
and Myron \\'atts. 

THE HOLY NAME SOCIETY (Manhattan, 
Bronx and Richmond) held its annual 
elections at the December meeting. 
The following members were unani- 
mously elected to serve for the vear 
1952 :' 

Joseph A. Kelly President 

John A. McHugh 1st Vice-Pres. 

John Buckley 2nd Vice-Pres. 

Eugene F. McQuillen Fin. Sec. 

William Mahoney Record. Sec. 

Timothy J. Finn Treasurer 

James Curtin Custodian 

James Devlin _ Marshall 

George Ahearn Ass't. Marshall 

Due to the excellent support given 
by members of the organization, the 
society was able to give Good Cheer 
Checks during the holiday season to 
families of deceased members of the 
department. This practice has been in 
effect for many years and receives the 
whole-hearted support of all members 
of the organization. 

THE POLICE SQUARE CLUB will hold a 
meeting on February 12 at the Ma- 



sonic Temple at 8 P.M. On January 15, 
the new president and board of offi- 
cers were installed at a dinner dance 
held at the Motel St. George. Justice 
George P. Stier was the installing 
officer. 

THE HONOR LEGION presented checks 
of $750 to two widows of members of 
the department who were killed in the 
line of duty. It was President Salter's 
sad duty to present the checks to Mrs. 
Thelma Loreto, wife of the late Patrol- 
man Alfred I.oreto and Mrs. Harold 
Randolph, wife of the late Patrolman 
Harold Randolph. 

THE COLUMBIA ASSOCIATION will hold 
its next meeting on Tuesday evening, 
February 19 at Werdermann's Hall. 
At this meeting, the annual election of 
officers will be held. All members are 
urged to attend and cast their ballots. 

THE POLICE GARRISON 3100 has held 
its election of officers and the follow- 
ing will serve for 1952 : 

Robert A. Kelly Commander 

Harry Bassin Vice-Comni. 

Louis Neher Vice-Comm. 

John Nevins Vice-Comm. 

William Wirth Vice-Comm. 

William Farrell Vice-Comm. 

Michael DeCandia Vice-Comm. 

Julius Loreth Chaplain 

Stanley Guzewicz Paymaster 

Edward McDonough Advocate 

Walter Pieloch Historian 



Pres. Regan Extends Welcome 




William Bau.sbacher Officer Day 

William Jacobs Officer Watch 

William Dineen Officer Guard 

Myron Housman Pat. Inst. 

THE NYC POLICE POSL 460 A.L dis- 
tributed gifts lo in\alid servicemen at 
the Veterans Hospital at Kingsbridge. 
Retired Patrolman William Clancy 
was chairman of the committee. The 
next meeting of the post will be on 
February 19 at the Jewish Guild for 
the Blind at 8 :30 P.M. 



OFFICERS OF THE LIEUTENANTS' ASSOCIATION welcome two newly promoted lieu- 

enants to their ranks. Left to right, Walter Clerke, Edgar J. Perry, Leo Sofron, 

Joseph J. Regan and Peter Nesdale. 



CURRENT 
LEGISLATIVE ACTION 

The city has appealed the negative 
decision on the law which required a 
thirty-day notice of retirement. Stat- 
ing that the law "was enacted to cor- 
rect a situation which was an outrage 
upon the public conscience," the city 
filed a brief with the Appellate Divi- 
sion of the State Supreme Court. It 
is expected that the case will be heard 
in the early part of March. 

A bill has been introduced in the 
City Council which w^ould have the 
effect of permitting all city employees, 
including police and fire, to join labor 
organizations of their own choosing. 
The measure, introduced on January 
9, has been referred to the committee 
on general welfare. The bill also pro- 
vides for the setting up of an appeals 
board to be known as the New York 
City Labor Relations Board. The board 
would be empowered to conduct in- 
quiries into any controversy brought 
before it by an employee. 

Another bill has been introduced 
which would call for the Police De- 
partment to own and operate all 
emergency service ambulances. The 
bill was referred to the committee on 
city affairs. The bill would permit the 
Police Commissioner to establish rules 
and regulations for the control of calls, 
dispatch and safety and equipment in 
vehicles. Ninety-one ambulances now 
operated by the city's voluntary hos- 
[litals would come under this ruling. 

The majority of the policemen and 
women, retired under the 63-year old 
mandatory retirement bill on December 
31, 1951. have taken the case to court. 
Protesting the constitutionality of the 
law. the 240 petitioners first requested 
an injunction which was denied. Su- 
preme Court Justice Thomas L. J. 
Corcoran stated that the case will 
be heard shortly and that if the law 
was held unconstitutional the members 
would be restored to duty with all their 
rights intact. 



■30 — 



StcuMn^ in the Xil^Mtif 

by REBECCA B. RANKIN, Libranan 



Municipal Reference Library; 



At Natural Bridge, Virginia, a robot 
policeman gnjards the approach to a 
dangerous curve. The robot is a special 
stop-and-go light which automatically 
halts speeding motorists who attempt 
to take the curve at a speed greater 
than the posted 25 miles an hour limit. 

If the motorists observes the limit, 
the robot policeman lets him pass with- 
out stopping. When a vehicle ap- 
proaches the curve, it passes over a 
detector imbedded in the northbound 
traffic lane. The light at this point is 
red, but the detector flashes an impulse 
to the robot and after a certain interval 
the light turns green. 

The time interval is adjusted so that 
a motorist moving at 25 miles an hour 
gets the green signal without pausing. 
There have been no fatal accidents at 
the curve since the light was installed 
more than four years ago, while in the 
ten years previous to the light's instal- 
lation, at least 12 persons died at the 
spot from automobile accidents, "High- 
way Research Abstracts" reports. 

The American City of November 
1951 carries a news-item about Pitts- 
burgh's new crime laboratory written 
by Harvey M. Schwalb. 



Vox Cop, the police journal read in 
Connecticut, may be equally interesting 
to police anywhere. In its November — 
December 1951 issue, we note "Police 
fatalities throw light on patrol 

methods." 

* * * 

A completely revised second edition 
of "New Horizons in Criminology" by 
Harry Elmer Barnes and Negley K. 
Teeters (N. Y., Prentice-Hall Inc., 
1951. 887p. 356 B26 nh2) has been 
received in the library. Since the first 
appearance of this book about ten 
years ago it has been a leading au- 
thority in the field. This new edition 
deals with new developments in the 
field of crime during the war years and 
after, and discusses the improved 
methods for the reform of criminals 
inside and outside of institutions as 
well as giving the historical and 
psychological background of the sub- 
ject. The layman as well as the students 
will find much of interest in this well- 
written book. 



Virgil W. Peterson, Director of the 
Chicago Crime Commission is also a 
lawyer and experienced as an F. B. I. 
agent, and he has studied the gambling 
problem at first hand. He has made a 
penetrating objective analysis of the 
legal aspects of gambling presented in 
a new book entitled Gambling — Should 
It Be Legalized? (Springfield, 111., 
Charles C. Thomas, 1951, 158 p. 
174.6P44g). The disastrous eftects that 
flow from a community's tolerance of 
organized, illegal gambling have been 
exposed, and the merits of legalization 
proposals which have been proposed 
as a remedy are weighed. 

The city employees and officials, who 
find this quite a fascinating exploita- 
tion of facts, will probably find them- 
selves in agreement with the conclusion 
that "history clearly reflects that legal- 
ized gambling in America has never 



eliminated any abuses. Instead, it has 
greatly increased economic, social and 
political evils. There is no place for 
legalized gambling in an enlightened 
society." 

* * * 

In a brief but well-integrated psy- 
chological study, Patterns of Panic 
(New York: International Universi- 
ties Press, Inc. 1950. 116 p. 356.22 
M47pa), Dr. Joost A. M. Meerloo has 
defined panic and its degrees, shown 
what influences it, how prevalent it is 
in our present world, and how to over- 
come it. The book is written especially 
for those mobilized in times of disaster, 
such as soldiers and Red Cross per- 
sonnel, but its style is descriptive, 
omitting theory as much as possible, 
which makes the book rather easy to 
read. It should appeal to the public and 
lead to more general understanding of 
panic and what it does to human 
beings. It should also arouse those 
apathetic to the necessity for civil de- 
fense, because widespread recognition 
of "hidden patterns of panic" would 
also demonstrate that people's best 
weapon against panic is well-planned 
organization and real leadership. 




3E(^^PM 





31 — 




NO SM OVER 



MANHATTAN 

3rd PRECINCT: Tighten your belts, boys ! The hidden man was 
around again. Taxes didn't cut your pay, only your check. The new 
system they have in this modern day and age has a certain amount 
of finesse. You look for a raise and they cut your check. You fig- 
ure it out; and if you can find a solution, have it copyrighted or 
patented and look for retirement at an early age in comfort. . . . 
With the New Year upon us and the world being what it is — all of 
us have some gripe at one time or another, but being this edition is 
so close to the time when we all make resolutions as a guide for 
the new year, we thought it an opportune time to insert this small 
story, recently brought to our attention, which goes like this : 

"Long ago the people of a small village were discontented. 
Each thought his troubles were the hardest to bear. Soon the 
village's good angel became tired of listening to the people. So 
one day, the angel gave each person a big bag, told him to 
drop his troubles in it, then hang the bag on a certain 
wall. At a signal, each person was to run as fast as he 
could to the wall and pick out any bag that he wanted. 
What happened? The people were nearly crushed in their 
scramble toward the wall — to get their own bags back. . . . 
ANYONE HAVE ANY COMPLAINTS? . . . We could do with 
a few of the brighter things. Soooooooo — congratulations are in 
order for our recently departed — shouldn't use that word — but depart 
they did — from one rank to another : Sergeants O'Rourke and 
Sackman — now lieutenants; Patrolman Collins and Blumenthal — 
now sergeants. . . . Also a bright welcome for our new officers, 
Lts. Housman and Murphy; Sgts. Klecak and O'Neil; not to forget 
our four new additions — real live rookies : Diesa, Dispenza, Holo- 
binka and Lobenberg. . . . Cigars passed around just before this 
article was written — Lieutenant Sackman walked in with the age 
old saying : "It's a girl," and not a bad brand of cigar. You see 
this gentleman has it all figured out. Some day he expects Uncle 
Sam will pay him instead of his paying Uncle Sam. Good work 
if you can get it. According to the tax deductions, you are still 
two behind for a free ride. And such a young man too. . . . 
"Smokey" Graziano after spending his youth with this department, 
thinking about changing over to the Fire Department : Had an 
experience recently so now thinks he's a fire-fighter. . . . Precinct Co- 
ordinator Larry Jessup, alias Whispering Smith — doing such a fine 
job he was drafted into covering two precincts (1 & 3). . . . Courtesy 
visit by one of our elite — "City Hall" Mickey Nihill — and looking 
better than ever. He reports that conditions are under control under 
the able leadership of the "General" — "Admiral" — "Commissioner"— 
"Chief" — : You know who. . . . Could do with a card or visit to 
Ed Lambiase on sick report for the past several months. Hope 
he'll be back with us soon and as good as ever. . . . There are many 
prospective "sergeants" in the making. It only costs $4.00 to see 
if you know the answers and what to look forward to in this job. 
Good luck to everyone. (You'll need it). ... So you don't make 
it. They won't fire you. You can still be a good cop. . . . Until we 
meet again — carry on. 

8ih PRECINCT: . . . Smiling at you here are the two hand- 
some sons of justly proud Frank Novak — little Binky, and big 
brother Lester. Binky is wild about checkers, jokebooks, bike riding. 




The Novak Heirs 

roller skating, tree climbing, and Dad. Lester wants to grow up to 
be a cop — "like Pop," and being fond of horses expresses his pre- 
ference for the Mounted Division. . . . Henny Roth has officially 
dubbed Herb Davis "The Happy Mortician," with Ed Barrett the 
undisputed expert hereabouts in such matters, and an undertaker of 
the Old School, beaming approval. . . . WHO recently responded 
to the Radio Dispatcher with a "TEN K ! ! !" (new signal no 
doubt, Ed.) — The west side Willies, Keane and O'Rourke, may be 
able to shed some light on tliis bafllcr. . . . Brockhues asking your 
reporter in all seriousness, "Have you ever sung professionally, 
William ?" When asked why the interest, he replied : "Don told 
me all about you." — Henceforth peppers are barred at La Casa San- 
jour. . . . Many of us were not privileged to be present at the 
Christmas party held for the kiddies, but our staff informs us that 
the effervescent Maurice Harrington was his usual magnificent 
Santa, while Uncle Paul Ludwig and Cousin Henry Kelly con- 
tributed no end to the success of the happy occasion. Cicero was 
observed trying out all the nice new toys before the kids did. . . . 
It is with a touch of sadness that we bid farewell to Sgt. Hagerty 
and Patrolmen Schleier, Cohen and Potter. Their leaving was not 
of their own choice, and we know they will miss us as much as 
they themselves will be missed. So long, men ; the best of health and 
happiness to each of you. . . . Our welcome is extended to new 
transferees : Ptl. Horan from the 28lh Pet. and Ptl. Balfe formerly 
of Traffic C. At the same time we bid adieu to Patrolmen Alvins 
and Lavender, who are now on duly in the Sixth Division and 
Traffic C respectively. . . . Add to our roster of sergeants the names 
of Gage and Zito; we know their stay with us will be a very happy 
one. ... A hearty hello to Probationary Patrolmen Coughlin, Gavin, 
Zalusky, ALFRED E. SMITH, and \\lLLIE SUTTON. 



— 32 — 



13th PRECINCT: —This is my first installment for SPRING 
3100 and maybe my last— Anyway, guys, I'm trying, . . . Belated 
Bouquets: To Ptl. Porcaro for making 300 orphans happy by play- 
ing Santa Claus at the Bronxwood Inn, Bronx, N. Y. With the 
Baron's red flannels and 14 pillows, Porcaro filled Santa's shoes to a 
tee— Ptl. Vinnie Holcroft also delighted the youngsters of the PAL 
as Santa Claus at the Parkside Hotel in Manhattan.— Congratula- 
tions to Ptl. Gianone on the new arrival— a dream girl, tipping 
the scales at 8 pounds. — Our sincerest sympathy to Ptl. Murtha on 
the death of his mother — Speedy recovery to Lt. Russo's wife 
after a serious operation. — Good work Ptl. Novello and Ptl. Hur- 
som who assisted the stork on December 14, 1951. Mother and 
baby are doing fine. . . . 

15th PRECINCT: MEN OF THE MONTH— Dets. William 
Sims and Edward Behr, 15th Squad, for the arrest of a man for 
passing bad checks not only in this tow'n, but several other cities 
throughout tlie country. . . . HAPPY BIRTHDAY— To John 
Buonaiuto, Ed Driscoll, Pete Fenton, Sam Kirwan, Frank Mc- 
Donald, John McKenna, Andy McLaughlin, Frank O'Rourke, and 

Henry Sorenson MAGNA CUM LAUDE— Sgt. Robert O'Don- 

nell, who placed twenty-second on die list for promotion to lieutenant 
and was appointed and assigned to the 9th Pet. . . . WELCOME — 
To Lt. Charles Smyth, Sgts. John Robb and Jim Lancaster. . . . 
THANKS — On behalf of all members of this command, we wish to 
express our appreciation for all the wonderful Christmas cards, the 
guys and gals mailed into the house. Even Lt. John Sullivan, with 
the U. S. Navy remembered us. . . . HAPPY ANNIVERSARY— 
Sgt. Tohn Flumach and the lovely wife celebrated their 20th wedding 
on New Year's Eve. ... ON THE TOWN— Doug Wisnofsky and 
Joe Beck in a deep conference trying to fi.gure out what to buy the 
girl friends for Valentine's Day. (Don't they know that diamonds 
are a girl's best friend?) . . . Nick Arpino and Frank McDonald 
enjoying chicken cacciatore with some raviolis and wine over in the 
Sportsmen's in Brooklyn. . . . SERGEANTS' TEST— We looked 
in our crystal ball the other night and came up with the following 

Christmas Dinner Brigade 




THE PRIESTS OF THE HOLY NAME CENTRE FOR HOMELESS 
MEN, located at 18 Bleeker Street, Manhattan, had ample 
and able assistance from the bluecoats of the 8th Precinct 
when they distributed over 2,700 Christmas Dinners to the poor 
tnen of the Bowery area. Photographed above are (left to 
right): (Standing) — Patrolmen John Worga, James Kelly, 
Michael Rusinijak, Salvatore Porco, Lester Meagner, Sergeant 
Charles Snow and Patrolman Moe Schleier (since retired). 
(Kneeling) — Patrolman Albert Serra, Reverend Charles B. 
Brennan and Reverend Joseph L. Melody of the Holy Name 
Centre. The picture was taken by Reverend Walter L. Schroeder, 
a brother of Patrolman Henry Schroeder of the 34th Precinct. 



Former Chief Surgeon Honored 

Michael O'Brien, the Daily News columnist and chair- 
man of the Dr. Joseph S. Baldwin Memorial, observed the 
second anniversary of the late chief surgeon's death on 
Januray 8. In a letter to Police Commissioner George P. 
Monaghan, he expressed his appreciation for the gener- 
ous cooperation of the members of the department in 
making the memorial a success. 

In addition to Mr. O'Brien, the officers of the Baldwin 
Memorial erected at the Holy Family Hospital included 
former Police Commissioner George V. McLaughlin, Hon. 
James A Farley, Borough President John Cashmore, Dr. 
George A. Sheehan and Lieutenant John J. Boyle. 



observation that at least five men in this house will be in the first 
seventy-five on tlie list. . . . HOBBY— Paul Gross and tlie beautiful 
wife have for the past three years been taking technicolor motion 
pictures of their four adorable children each Christmas morning as 
they gather about the tree and open their presents. They say that 
all the gold in Fort Knox could not buy these films of bygone years, 
and your reporter seconds the motion. . . . AULD LANG SYNE — 
Sgt. Edward Donohue and Ptl. Martin McGowan were both re- 
tired at the beginning of the year because of age. Sgt. Donohue 
was appointed December 5, 1911 and Ptl. McGowan, September 25, 
1912. They have a combined record of 79 years in the department 
and service to the people of New York Citj-. We believe that the 
most gripping moment in a policeman's life comes when he walks 
up to the desk for the last time and hands over his retirement papers, 
equipment and shield. They call the shield "the tin" in the job 
and it costs but a few cents to manufacture, but all the gold in 
the world cannot buy it, for only die "Finest" may wear it. Regard- 
less of his rank, from patrolman to the highest officer in the job, 
the cop knows that when he hands over his shield some part of his 
life goes with it. Our only hope and wish is that some of the 
polish of Sgt. Donohue and Ptl. Martin McGowan rubbed off on us. 
. . We will say goodbye for now; we are headed for the smartest 
shop on Fifth Avenue to purchase a card and present for our favorite 
dream boat for Valentine's Day. 

22nd PRECINCT: Your reporter was laid low by a virus for a 
week or so and upon returning learned that several changes had 
taken place in that short time. Our good friends, Sgt. Peter Fin- 
negan and James Marmion, are retired pending a court decision on 
the constitutionality of the Administrative Code section which auto- 
matically retires members of the force at 63 years. Our wishes and 
prayers are with the sergeants, for there were never two better 
"bosses" in the job ! . . . Never a winter goes by that several of our 
boys have to take a dunking and risk pneumonia to rescue adventurous 
kids who have to see just how strong the ice is. Recently Joe 
Yiachos and Louis Braverman received their baptism at the 72nd 
Street Lake where diree boys had gone in— and lucky for the boys, 
the cops came along! One of the boys would surely have been a 
goner. Good work, men ! Incidentally on that same day. Bill Skog- 
lund encountered a young boy who went through the ice at the 
100th Street Pool. By remaining calm and using good judgment. 
Bill was able to direct the boy to shore. He wrapped him in a 
blanket and rushed him to the hospital where he was treated for 
submersion and exposure. You used your head, Willie! . . . The 
Academy has sent us a new bunch of yearlings and so we welcome 
Probationarj- Patrolmen Boy, Caffrey, Crow, Devine, Flannery, Gal- 
lagher, McElroy, and Reidy. We know that you'll like the park, 
men; everyone does. . . . W'e extend belated best wishes to Ptl. 
Francis Meehan and his lovely new wife, Geraldine, on their en- 
trance into matrimony. Geraldine is a Navy nurse and we can very 
well imagine how very difficult it must be for the new^Tveds since 
she is stationed at Betliesda, Marjland. Well, stout heart, Frank, 

(Conf/nued on page 35) 



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LOOKING 'EM OVER-rconf/nued; 



We're sure that your bride will be with you soon! Just saw, with a 
half-a-tan, none other than Martin Curnan, just back from his 
Florida vacation. And he was headin' for the Zoo Area ! Now, 
Martj' what is the interest there? Hmmni? . . . We won't have to 
worry about that handball contest with Lt. McCarthy, since the 
good lieutenant has been transferred to the 4th Precinct. Good luck, 
Lt. . . . Sgt. Miller is now Lt. Miller and we are the first, we hope, 
to offer congratulations to the Lt. He knows his stuff and we don't 
mean maybe! (What an 'orrible cliche! We're gonna have to do 
better than that.). . . . Say, did you hear about the fellow who was 
really loaded? As he staggered out of the gin-mill, a man watched 
as he went towards his car. Approaching him, he said, "You're not 
going to drive are you?" "Sure," said the lush, "I'm too drunk to 
walk !" . . . Almost forgot the new bosses, and this would never do ! 
Welcome to the 22, Lts. Tauber and Marsh, and Sgts. Redden and 
Bernhard. And now for our losses : Joe Parisi to Mcy., Fortuna and 
Devaney to CB, and Joe Morgan to the 13th. Well, men, remember 
how nice it's gonna be here in about three months ! And now for 
our monthly salute to those celebrating natal day : 'Oppy buffda}- 
to Rcco Doino, John DeRoeck, Mr. Flannery, John Koski, King, 
Otto Kotraba, Jack Lynch, Frank Monohan, Willie Verdeosa, and 
Jack Wells. Boys, that year rolled around fast ! Our commanding 
officer's very attractive daughter, Marjorie entered the sacred state 
of matrimony recently and the best wishes of the command are 
extended to the newlyweds. We know that with the grace of God, 
much happiness lies ahead. . . . February is a short month, so we 
can't have too much trouble . . . tennyrate, not as much as in a 31 
day month. Our presence on sick report wasn't a total loss. Now, 
this is our opinion: We were able to write two (2) short stories, 



Japanese Medals to Department 




COMMISSIONER GEORGE P. MONAGHAN accepts Japanese police medals 

from Major General Charles H. Willoughby while Inspector Benjamin King 

(left) and Captain George G. Gallagher watch. 

Af a ceremony held in Police Headquarfers late in December, 
Major General Charles H. Willoughby, USA, retired, former 
chief of intelligence for General MacArthur in the Far East, pre- 
sented to the department two medals given him by the Japa- 
nese police. The medals were awarded to General Willoughby 
for his part in supervising the work of the rehabilitation and 
reorganization of police in Japan following World War II. 

General Willoughby said that he feels most of the credit 
should go to the New York City Police Department. In 1946, 
at the request of General MacArthur, the late Police Commis- 
sioner Lewis J. Valentine headed a team of specialists that went 
to Japan to bring about the rehabilitation and democratization 
of the Japanese police. At the Police Headquarters ceremony. 
Inspector Benjamin King and Captain George G. Gallagher, two 
members of the department who made the journey to Japan, 
were present as Police Commissioner Monaghan accepted the 
medals on behalf of the department. The medals are now on 
display at the museum of the Police Academy, 7 Hubert Street. 




"So \ S/\»D To \Me Cp«vtp.in' Vou Can't Bo^^ 
^'Ve /\«ouN^, V^\ Hot \n Voor Vrecinct" 

which we submitted to the magazne and which we hope contain the 
necessary ingredients to make interesting reading and entertain our 
readers. We hope so, anyway ! . . . The students are still making 
like mad and we're strongly tempted to study. But we repeat our 
philosophy : The best time in the job is when you're a cop ! We'll 
see. Since, as we said before, this is a short month, so shall this 
be a short column. See you next month, and remember, men ; Keep 
the Faith ! 

28th PRECINCT: Our condolences are herewith extended to 
the family of George Pfeiffer on the passing of his father-in-law. 
. . . The past month saw perhaps an unparalleled turnover in per- 
sonnel in this command — 42 members involved I ... To those who 
left here, we are truly sorry to lose your companionship and/or 
guidance and leadership; to those who join us here, we extend a 
welcoming hand in greeting ! ... To our newly promoted Lt. James 
Austin, and Sgts. Joseph McDonald, Michael Ward, and Anthony 
LaBarbera go our congratulations and welcome ! . . . We also greet 
Sgt. Francis O'Hagan, who emerges from the woody timberlands 
of the 26th Pet., and Ptl. Art Plate, also an "ex-forest ranger" 
from the 22nd. . . . Welcome also to our large class of Probies, 
namely : Bax, Borden, Counihan, Coyne, Fella, Fusco, Gallo, Glusko, 
Goggins, Greene, Harrington, Johnson, Kojamanian, Lamar, May- 
nard, Mounkhall, Murphy, O'Reilly, Raines, \'avra and Williams ! 
. . . Sadly, we bid a fond adieu to two of our top-notch sergeants, 
both true gentlemen, keenh' admired by all their subordinates here 
in the 28th — Steve Sokol and Frank Bernard who went, respective- 
ly, to the 26th and 22nd Precincts. May you find the men there as 
pleasant to work with, as we found you here in the 28th ! . . . Then, 
by way of promotion, we lost Pearse Meagher (now Lt., 10th Divi- 
sion) ; Robert Marsh (Lt., 22nd) ; and Bill Kelly, long-time stal- 
wart champion of the children of the PAL (now a Sgt. in the 
17th Pet.). Our other losses this month included big Ray Costello 
to the 6th Pet. ; John Hennessey, 24th ; Bill Horan, 8th ; Joe Begley, 
34th; Danny O'Reilly, 46th; Elmer Berger, 4th; and Mark (Ger- 
ard!) Callahan, 18th — all "top-drawer" policemen, to whom we 
send our fondest hopes for happiness in their new assignments ! 
Then, in addition, Pat Fusco and Bill Riordan left us for Motor- 
cycle. And, sad to relate, at this verj' writing. Bill is confined to 
the hospital, having sustained serious injuries while motor-biking 
on East River Drive, when hit by an errant ta.xidriver. We are as 
one in extending the fervent wish that by press-time Bill will be 
back in harness, a resplendent figure in his Mcy. uniform I . . . 
Lastly, John Butler left us for the ponies, going mounted via 
Squadron No. 1. . . . We, here in the 28th Precinct, feel hard hit 
by the absence of so many friendly faces of long acquaintance, but 
we wholeheartedly wish you all well in your new commands, and 
as cordially greet our new members ! . . . Walt Donovan and Dan 
Boiko are to be congratulated on the very fine police work they 
performed in overcoming and arresting an armed inan who was 
running amuck, a gun in one hand and a linoleum knife in the 
other ! . . . Walt Brady and AI Bostic displayed keen intelligence 
in effecting the arrests of two taxi-bandits. Walt and Al obtained 
descriptions from two cab driver-victims, and, alertly patrolling the 
vicinity of the crimes, observed two likely-looking suspects riding 
as passenger in a cab. On seeing the patrolmen the men attempted 
{Continued on page 37) 



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LOOKING 'EM OVER -fConHnued; 



to flee, but were overtaken, arrested and identified as the culprits ! 
. . . Our wheel-chair basketball game with the Bronx Veterans Hos- 
pital paraplegics was, oddly enough, cancelled on account of snow 
and ice! Freezing sleet rendered the city streets too perilous for 
the disabled vets to attempt the trip from hospital to gym ! . . . 
Jack (Lynch has proven to be an industrious worker since being 
assigned to the division office, but does he work that hard that he 
even comes in on his day off? 

BRONX 

42nd PRECINCT: The precinct extends its congratulations to 
the following ex-members of the command recently promoted: Cap- 
tain Elwood Metz; Lieuts. Samuel Fandel and Edward Psota; Sgts. 
Dick Corcoran, Fred Taylor and Mike Duffy. . . . We welcome 
Sgt. James Collins and Prob. Ptls. Hobday, Seebach and Turner; 
also Ptl. Carmody, recently transferred to our house. . . . What 
sergeant, who recently advised your reporter of the libel law, re- 
ported for desk duty with his shield inside his coat and the pin out- 
side? . . . The end of the year brought around the retirement of 
four of the boys : Bill Reif el, Bert HoUwig, Andy Conlin and 
Charlie Nussbaum — along with Polw. O'Neill, Relyea and Harri- 
son. . . . Seven oldtimers who were admired by all! . . . Sgt. John 
Donnelin still on sick report, also Joe Costello, Bertie Nethersole 
and John Mikos — and in a space all his own. Jack Klein. . . . Ar- 
rests for the past month : George Nave, Lou Tanney, Jimmy Quinn, 
Fiore Latini, Sam Bichler, Mark Francis and Tom Leonard. . . . 
The young desk officers like the idea of young matrons. ... So 
does everyone else ! . . . Heard Johnny McKenna got the gold 
shield. . . . Sgt. Berrigan back to Traffic Pet. "N". . . . Georgie 
Porette married Dec. 8, 1951 in full dress. . . . Mazzucci back from 
the wars. . . . Those new day squad assignments remind us that 
we're getting older every day. . . Ziggy Koziac is now riding. . . . 
What's this talk I hear about impeaching Mike Smith? ? 

43rd PRECINCT: While we were out on our fishing trip we 
managed to get a few good photos. This one shows McCarthy pos- 
ing triumphantly after pulling in two fish at one time. That's 
Charley Schneider in the rear giving Mac the Bronx cheer. . . . 

, You're still a rookie in the pre- 
cinct if you can't locate the fol- 
lowing places : Murray Court, 
Rudd Place, Harrod Place, Ka- 
minski Lane, Glenn Estates, Big 
Rock Road, Elberon Ave., Ef- 
fingham Ave., Howe St., and 
Barret St. . . . We see that 
Jack O'Leary apprehended two 
youths who had stolen an auto 
belonging to a cop, and a few 
niglits later bagged two soldiers 
with an auto stolen in Brook- 
lyn. ... I guess you all read 
about Gene McCord and Jimmy 
Satriano and their encounter 
with the Chinaman. . . . Dave 
Garfain and Harry Kaiser made 
a very nice pinch in the 52nd 
Precinct while they were on a 
payroll escort. It was for assault 
and robbery in a jewelry store. 
. . . Our sergeants who made a pretty good showing on the lieu- 
tenant's lists are : Joel Cohen, Edward Beiner, Richard Larkin, 
Walter Friedman and Morris Gerwitz. The total amount of men 
who filed for the forthcoming sergeants' exam is 9,616. . . . We 
see that Capt. Elbert Harrison is now the CO. of the 20th Precinct 
on West 68th Street. . . . We were sorry to hear that one of our 
brother officers. Art Nealon, from the 52nd Precinct was killed in 
action in Korea. . . . Here's a get well wish for Joe DiMinno who 
was sick for a while. . . . Condolences to Eddie Joyce on the loss 
of his brother-in-law. . . . Welcome to the 43 to : Ptl. Mc.\leav>', 
Muller, Adamo, Hurles, Mischor, Baisle, Amarosa, and Kindle. 
(McAleavy and Muller came to us from other commands.) We 
hope you all are in the fold by now. . . . We had a good showing 
from our house at tliat pay raise rally at Hunter College. Let's hope 
our efforts will produce favorable results. . . . We hope you aren't 




McCarthy and Catch 



HEADS HOSPITAL ALUMNI 

At a recent meeting of the Alumni 
Association of Mount Sinai Hospi- 
tal Dr. William M. Hitzig, Police 
Department Surgeon was elected 
president for 1952. The associa- 
tion is made up of about 2,000 
physicians formerly members of 
the house staff of the hospital. 
Dr. Hitzig, presently as associate 
physician at Mount Sinai, is a dip- 
lomate in internal medicine and 
cardiovascular diseases. 




as far behind in P.B.A. dues as we are. It's tough when you let 
it get a couple of months behind. We have to avoid poor Dave 
Abrams in the meantime. . . . Things just don't seem right around 
the S.H. with John \\'eis and Barney Dolan gone, but there may 
be some court reversal on the 63 year bill. In the meantime we 
sure miss the boys. . . . Jim DeCamp tells us he recently met two 
Boston policemen and got some interesting facts about their job: 
A yearly salary of $4100 but with a take home pay of $70 a week; 
they are paid weekly; retirement in twenty years at two-thirds pay; 
pension cost of 5 per cent; equipment furnished free; every two 
years a new set of uniforms are issued (except die overcoat which 
they keep for five years) ; they expect a salary increase soon ; pay 
roll escorts are taken voluntarily by off-duty men and they are paid 
by the company escorted; and they work a 40 hour week. . . . 
Atlantic City has employed 30 women to replace traffic men at school 
crossings. The girls must be between 21 and 45 years old, and at 
least 5 feet 4 inches in height. They are paid $2.50 a day for cover- 
ing the school crossings. ... A London, England, policeman gets 
paid time-and-a-half for four hours if he has to make a court ap- 
pearance on his time off, even if he's in court for only one hour. . . . 
We note that a City Councilman from Queens has introduced a 
bill to stop the Police Dept. from furnishing free payroll escorts. 
He says it is a loss of 20,000 man-hours a week for the depart- 
ment. . . . There is also a bill pending that would authorize time- 
and-a-half overtime for city firemen. . . . The stork came through 
with boys for Sal DeCico, Charley Jenks, and your reporter Gene 
Loewy. Consult any, or all three for cigars and secret formula. . . . 
We've been accused of leaving the Civilian Defense boys out of 
the gossip so we'll take this opportunity to say hello to Marcy 
Regan, Eddie Joyce, and Charley Cassidy. Sgt. Walt Friedman is 
now in charge of the CD. replacing Sgt. Richard Larkin who was 
transferred to the 34th Precinct. ... A new playground on Morris 
Park Ave. has been officially opened and is named after the late 
Ptl. Alfred Loreto. ... All that heat, emanating from the boiler 
is the result of Johnny Goetz experimenting with his new job. . . . 
In our WHO dept. : WHO was the first man to file for the com- 
ing sergeants' exam (he works inside) ? . . . WHO else made out 
an application (initials L.G.) ? . . . WHO left his four dollar um- 
brella at the Civil Service Commission? . . . WHO put in an appli- 
cation iot his wife to take the policewoman's test? . . . WHO 
almost ran over Sgt. Holtzhammer on Bruckner Blvd. with 
his black Buick? . . . WHO shrewdly got rid of his two kids so 
he could study by merely asking tliem : "How come you're not dowTi 
watching the fire at the schoolhouse? . . . WHO is the sergeants' 
chauffeur who put paper sugar wrappers in his coffee and threw the 
lumps of sugar out the window (W.W.) ? (Studying too hard?) 
. . . WHO put his own name on a summons as the defendant? . . . 
WHO are the lads who brought a bench to enable them to sit in 
the locker room but they found out they couldn't get it up the 
stairs? ... At roll call one morning recently did you notice the 
sergeant's face when, as he was checking guns, he got to a new 
man and was presented with the gun, barrel first? ... To date the 
P.D. Honor Legion has twelve members in our precinct while last 
year we had only one. . . . Our holiday' season was considerably sad- 
dened by the sudden death of Patrolman Lloyd Osborne. "Jack" as 
he preferred to be called was well liked by all his brother officers. 
Jack was a good cop and a fine fellow. All of us from the 43rd Pre- 
(Continued on page 39) 



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LOOKING 'EM OVER-rcon«nued; 



cinct take this opportunity to extend our condolences to his loved 
ones. . . . Keep an eye peeled for a short story that tnay appear in 
this magazine written by a sector-five man. ... Be careful men, this 
is leap year ! ! 

QUEENS 

102nd PRECINCT: We were all sorry to lose Captain Joseph 
Kalbacher, one of our most popular C.O.'s, who left for the 103rd 
Precinct. Best to you, Captain, at your new home grounds. . . . We 
cordially welcome our new skipper. Captain Joseph R. McQuade, 
via the 108th Precinct. May your stay with the 102nd be a happy 
and a friendly one. . . . We also welcome new recruits William Cro- 
call, John Feeley, and Raeffele Paduano and transferee Edward 
Schemet via the 74th. Hold your hats. This is official : — Dan O'Brien 
is apartment hunting. Yes, O'B has finally tangled with cupid; the 
big day will occur in April. Now all you doting fathers, please re- 
move your hooks from our boy, for Dan has "done been landed." 
Congratulations Dan, to you and your intended. . . . We lost Nas- 
dahl, now a Det. 3rd Grade to the Police Lab. Best of luck, George, 
on your new assignment. . . . The students who are hitting the books 
are now being called "Ding Dong." All are beginning to hear bells. 
. . . We understand that Brennan loves rye bread, huh ! . . . Dem- 
chak states that one good feature of the automatic shoe shine ma- 
chine is that it eliminates tipping. Did I say Demchak? I must be 
off my trolley for Demchak and tipping do not go hand-in-hand. 
. . . Sgt. Gribbon and Tierney, our latest fishing team, recently 
returned from a fishing expedition sans fish and frozen to the gills. 
Scully commented that the Sgt. had his seasons crossed again; he 
should have gone "frost fishing." . . . Above team attempted to buy 
two-thirds share of O'Brien's boat, but O'B offered them 49 per cent. 
He wanted control of the boat and his 51 per cent was enough to 
prevent his new crew members from sailing down the Rhine. . . . 
Tierney, Stegman, Scully and possibly Trauerts are anticipating a 
trip to Chibaquaman, Province of Quebec — what gives? . . . Det. Al 
Clarke, Homicide Squad, has finally taken the step. This month, 
Al will be a civilian with a pair of boxing gloves and a couple of 
Mexican jumping beans. I am sure Jim O'Brien will see that you 
receive a big send off, Al. . . . Brother Jim Wallace, the man behind 
our First Saturday, Lady of Fatima, Communion Group, is once 
again seeking to enlarge his group. How about some new faces? 
Jim would like to see at least SO men from the 102nd every first 
Saturday. He promises to keep Bisig away from the rolls and eggs. 
. . . Captain Henrik Carlsen, skipper of the recently stricken ship, 
"Flying Enterprise," had nothing on Sgt. Gribbon, so he claims. 
The sergeant relates that during the 1st World War, his sub-chaser 
was torpedoed at the bow, which eventually became completely 
flooded. Sgt. G, did not bat an eye; he piloted the stern of the 
sub-chaser from London to N.Y. (And to think the Fibbers Club 
awarded first prize to somebody else.) 

111th PRECINCT: Congratulations to the Editor and his staff 
for a splendid December issue. For those who are studying for the 
coming sergeants' examination, the article on narcotics was terrific. 
. . . New P.B.A. Delegate Danger has found a new method for the 
collection of dues. Any other delegate who would like to find out 
about his system, can contact him at the 111th Precinct. . . . Ptl. 
Joe Grier's wife knitting small socks again. . . . Ptl. John Finnegan 
doing a grand job as precinct Youth Patrolman. . . . Good luck to 
Clarence Hartmann and Charlie Kennedy who recently retired. . . . 
Also a hearty welcome to Sgt. Woods. . . . Congratulations to Sgts. 
Anger and Ha\es — both did well on recent lieutenant's exam. . . . 
Ray Ryan burning the midnight oil, getting ready for the coming 
sergeants' exam. . . . How about some of you boys either writing 
or calling Capt. Zipp, who has been ill for a long time? . . . Speedy 
Martini having his troubles keeping his bowlers in line. 

OTHER UNITS 

TRAFFIC G: Our congratulations and a hearty welcome to 
Sgt. James Grove, recently proirioted and assigned to this command. 
Jim comes from Traf. Pet. H. . . . Anodier old friend of ours, 
Sgt. Eugene McGuiimess, is back in this command after 14 years' 
absence — altogether too long for us who knew him when he was a 
cop here. ... A very deep farewell to Lt. Thomas Egan and Sgt. 
Matthias Logan who were forced to retire under new legislation. 
May their loss be temporary and we hope that they will return to 



us real soon. . . . Sorry to lose Bob Lively and Frank Ruckel who 
were recently transferred to the Harbor Pet. We wish them luck 
in their new assignment. . . . Our deepest sympathy to Robert Betz 
on losing his mother, also to Mike Disegni who lost his son-in-law 
in a plane crash in Tripoli. 

DIVISION OF LICENSES: Our column for the early part of this 
new year is a very sad one in more ways than one. First of all, 
this command was deeply shocked by the untimely death of Ptl. 
Johnny Culhane. Johnny was a young, handsome man, with a full 
life ahead of him, always smiling, always gay, and ALWAYS will- 
ing to help someone. A REAL GOOD COP ! ! On Christmas day, 
he was rushed to the hospital with a ruptured ulcer, and died five 
days later. To his bereaved family, we extend our sincere con- 
dolences. . . . Last month's issue carried congratulations to Civ. 
Irving Bergerman on the birth of a baby boy. We regret that in 
this month's issue we must convey our sincere sympathy to Irving 
on the loss of his baby. . . . Also our sincere sympathy to Sgt 
Cahalane on the loss of his father-in-law, and to Civ. Joe Solomon 
on the loss of his father-in-law. . . . Also to Ptl. Siemers on the 
loss of his father, and to Ret. Ptl. Jim Towhie on the loss of his 
mother. . . . We wish a speedy recovery to Sgt. Dan Casey. Danny 
was on his way home from work two days before Christmas, when 
a woman walking in front of him slipped and fell. Danny rushed 
to her rescue, and he went down also. Forgetting his own discom- 
fort, he helped the woman get up, and inquired as to how she felt. 
She thanked Danny, and walked away, unhurt. Danny began to feel 
severe pain in his shoulder, and when he reached home, he had to 
get a doctor. Result : A bad fracture of tlie right shoulder. Now 
Danny is on sick report — and the lady? He doesn't even know who 
she is ! ! FATE ! ! . . . We hope that Civ. Eddie Conlon's Mrs. is 
well on the mend. She spent all the holidays in the hospital. . . . 
Now for a little brighter news to offset this other news ! ! Johnny 
Egan is the proud father of a nice big boy, born on Christmas morn- 
ing ! ! Congratulations, Johnny. I thought you were all through 
with that stuff ! . . . Sgt. Bill Loures looking hale and hearty 
after a two-week vacation in Florida ! Very soon we will be call- 
ing him Lt. Bill Loures ! He's THAT high on the lieutenants' list. 
. . . And our very new, and very handsome, young Lt. Leddy wears 
that new shield like a veteran, . . . Ptl. Bill Backoff, who is now 
Capt. Bill Backoff, U.S.A. F., came up from Virginia on leave, and 

stopped off to wish us happy holidays DEPUTY INSPECTOR 

Herman Schwartzberg, who used to be a "COP" in this office, sends 
his very best regards to everyone. . . . Our best wishes to all our 
retired members, voluntary, and otherwise. We wish them a long 
and happy life in their retirement. Good luck, bovs ! You've earned 
that "TAKE-IT EASY" LIFE. 

ON DUTY IN FAR EAST 




Two members of the department presently serving with the army 
in Korea are Captain John R. Howard (13th Pet.), on the leh, 
and Captain Narcisse F. Gervais (TrofFic H). This picture was 
taken while they were attending a chemical school in Japan. 
Captain Howard's regular command is the famed 24th Infantry 
Division, while Captain Gervais is assigned to the 94th Military 
Police Battalion. 



39- 



; 



N 



iN^^s^iaM 






IN SERVICE 



Lt. 

PtI. 

PtI. 

PtI. 

PtI. 

PtI. 

PtI. 

PtI. 

PtI. 



Name Appointed Command 

George D. Engley Jan. 2, 1930 G.C.P. Pet... 

James W. Cunningham June 2, 1926 17th Pet... 



1/^ 



Died 

Dec. 23, 
Dec. 24, 



James A. Walsh Nov. 1, 1926 14th Pet. Dec. 26, 

Lloyd L.Osborne Mar. 5, 1948 43rd Pet Dec. 29, 

John G. Culhane Dec. 22, 1937 52nd Pet Dec. 30, 

John J. Degnan Mar. 22, 1929 Traf. B Jan. 1, 

Matthew W. Segrell Nov. 1, 1926 18th Pet. Jan. 2, 

Philip J. Charles Jan. 10, 1927 10th D.D. Jan. 8, 

Patrick Keane .'. _ May 1, 1919 Mtd. Sqdn. 2 Jan. 9, 



1951 
1951 
1951 
1951 
1951 
1951 
1952 
1952 
1952 



RETIRED 



Det. Div. Jan. 

Dec. 

Dec. 



Insp. Michael F. McDermott Apr. 6, 1912 

Capt. Daniel J. Prendergast Mar. 27, 1907 Traf. L. 

Capt. John M. Hackett Jan. 2, 1897 Traf. P. 

Capt. John E. McGrath Jan. 21, 1897 Traf. H. Jan. 

Lt. George J. Andrews July 2, 1908 Det. Div Dec. 

Lt. Albert S. Nawrod July 2, 1925 23rd Div. Jan. 

Sgt. August Lauster Mar. 1, 1907 90th Pet. Dec. 

Sgt. Vincent P. Clohessy Jan. 20, 1909 13th Pet. Dec. 

Sgt. William A. Hartery Sept. 27, 1905 67th Pet Jan. 

PtI. William F. Short Apr. 6, 1931 1st D.D Dec 

PtI. William C. Gilby July 7, 1896 Old 63rd Pet. Dec. 

PtI. John Raab ] Nov. 2, 1896 Old 112th Pet Dec. 

PtI. Theodore B. Woychinski Aug. 1, 1908 Traf. O. Dec. 

PtI. William A. Geyer Apr. 29, 1914 25th Pet Dec. 

PtI. James E. Gibson May 6, 1897 41st Pet. Dec. 

PtI. Joseph F. MeAliister Dee. 28, 1923 Det. Div Jan. 

PtI. Dennis J. Treaey Sept. 29, 1905 32nd Pet. Jon. 

PtI. DanielJ. McNiehol Oct. 21, 1905 74th Pet. Jan. 

Pfl. William A. Krause June 2, 1926 Har. Pet Jan. 

PtI. James Brennan Oct. 18, 1917 6th Pet. Jan. 



3, 1952 

15, 1951 
31, 1951 

7, 1952 

31, 1951 

3, 1952 

16, 1951 

21, 1951 
11, 1952 
18, 1951 
25, 1951 
20, 1951 
18, 1951 

22, 1951 
25, 1951 

3, 1952 

6, 1952 

6, 1952 

7, 1952 
10, 1952 



40 



WANTED BY THIS DEPARTMENT 



ASSAULT AND ROBBERY 




PHOTO TAKEN 1931 
Age 29 



WILLIAM SUTTON 

Alias Julian Loring, George Holland, Richard 
Courtney, Richard Loring and Edward Lynch. 

Age, 49 years; height, 5 feet, S'/z inches; weight, 150 
pounds; blue eyes; medium chestnut hair; fair complexion; 
medium build. 

Wanted for the robbery of branch office, Manufactur- 
er's Trust Company, Long Island City, Queens on March 
9, 1950. He has been indicted and bench warrant has 
been issued. 

Sutton is considered by veteran law enforcement of- 
ficers to be without peer in the underworld as a conceiver 
and user of disguises to perpetrate crimes. He has 
seemed to specialize in bank robbery and has, in the past, 
gained entry to premises, outside of business hours, by 
posing as police officer. Western Union messenger and 
mailman. 

He escaped from Sing Sing Prison in 1932 and from 
Eastern State Penitentiary in Pennsylvania in 1947, for 
both of which escapes he is also wanted. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 46 



$26,000 REWARD -WORLD'S FAIR BOMB EXPLOSION 



The Board of Estimate of the City of New Yorl< unanimously 
voted to appropriate $25,000 reward and the Detectives' Endowment 
Association of the Police Department, City of New York, has voted 
$1,000 reward for the apprehension, or for information leading to 
the apprehension and conviction of the individual or individuals, or 
organizations, that placed, or had any connection with placing, an 
infernal machine or bomb in the British Pavilion at the World's Fair, 
which, after being carried from the Pavilion to a vacant part of the 
Fair Grounds by members of this Department, exploded on Thursday, 
July 4, 1940, at about 4:40 p.m., causing the death of two detectives 
and injuries to other detectives. 



All information and the identity of persons furnishing it will 
be kept strictly confidential, and if the informant is not required as 
an essential witness and he so desires, the source of the information 
will not be disclosed. 

Persons having information should communicate in person or by 
telephone with Chief of Detectives' Office, Police Headquarters, 
Manhattan, 240 Centre Street, Telephone CAnal 6-2000. 

If more than one person is entitled to the reward, it will be pro- 
portionately distributed, and the Police Commissioner shall be the 
sole judge as to its distribution. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1940 
Age 22 



Homicide 

John Guisto — White; age 33 years; height, 5 
feet, 8 inches; weight 170 poimds; blue eyes; 
brown hair; wanted for homicide of Wil- 
liam Lurye, who was stabbed to death on Tune 
21, 1949 at 224 W. 35th Street, N.Y.C. He has 
been indicted by New York County Grand Jury 
and a bench warrant has been issued. Accomp- 
lice in this crime, Benedict Macri, surrendered 
to authorities on June 18, 1950. A $25,000.00 
reward has been offered by the International 
Ladies' Garment Workers Union for the arrest 
and conviction of the killers of William Lurye. 



Homicide and Felonious Assault 

Salverlo Lopes Lagoeiro — alias Salverio 

Lopes Da Silva — Age 55 years; height 5 feet, 
\\]'2 inches; weight 190 pounds; dark brown 
eyes and hair ; dark complexion ; scar under- 
neath chin; pit mark over left eye; a Portu- 
guese; occupation, a longshoreman; He is 
wanted for the shooting and killing of Joseph 
J. Serria, and shooting and wounding Felix 
Longo on board a barge at Pier 15, East River, 
New York, on November 14, 1941. 



m ^ 




PHOTO TAKEN 
Age 45 



1941 




PHOTO TAKEN 1946 
Age 22 



Homicide 

McKinley Seals — alias Dukey — Age 27 

years ; height, 5 feet, 6 inches ; weight, 135 
pounds ; maroon eyes ; black hair ; occupation, 
machine operator. He is wanted for shooting 
and killing Jerville Goodman on April 11, 1947. 
He has been indicted and bench warrant has 
been issued. 



Homicide 

Oc McLeod — Age 43; height 5 feet, 6; • 
iiiclies ; weight 138 pounds; brown eyes; black 
hair. He is wanted in connection with the 
perpetration of a homicide by stabbing, at 
Far Rockaway, Queens on August 1, 1951. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 40 



Membert of the Force who are tuccoMful in the opprehension of any person described on this page or who may obtain informotion which 

will lead to hit arrest will receive Departmental Recognition. 

GEORGE P. MONAGHAN, Police Commissioner. 



I 

1 






/^ 



1 



^1^ 




^. 




MARCH, 



9 5 2 





Vol. 23 



No. 3 



FRANK FRISTENSKY, JR. 

First Deputy Commissioner 



PtI. Joseph A. Callahan 

Polw. Yetta Cohn 

PtI. Thomas P. Connors 



A MAG.AZINE FOR POLICEMEN 



FRANK D. DOYLE 

Secretary of the Department, Editor 

CONRAD H. ROTHENGAST 

Chief Inspector 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Sgl. William M. Hombrechr 



JAMES McELROY 

Chief of SlofF 



PtI. Joseph Gangi 
Det. James W. Mogner 
PtI. Gerald Walsh 



In This Issue 



EDITORIAL 

NEWSPAPER AWARD 

OXYGEN THERAPY SERVICE 

D-DAY - MARCH 29 

AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS 

TOP COMMAND 

SPRING 3100 ANNIVERSARY 

THE OLD FORTY-NINER 

ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK 

THE RETIRED RING IN 

LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

BROWSING IN THE LIBRARY 

THE RECORDS SPEAK-SHORT STORY 

DOWN THE LINE 

RETIREMENTS 

STUDY HALL 

LOOKING EM OVER 

AMENDMENTS 

IN MEMORIAM 



Poge 

1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

9 

10 

13 

14 

17 

18 

19 

20 

22 

24 

27 

30-31-32-33-35-37-39 

36-38 

40 



PRECINCT REPORTERS 

PtI. Michael C. Zopf (3rd Pel.), PtI. William 
Sanjour (8th Pet.); PtI. Nicholas Perrino (13th 
Pet.); PtI. Charles F. Sullivan, Jr. (22nd Pet), PtI. 
John Peller (25th Pet.); PtI. Raymond R. Wieboldt 
(28th Pet.); PtI. Don Crowley ond PtI. Gene Loewy 
(43rd Pet.); PtI. Peter Locolelli (66th Pet.); Ptl. E. 
A. Murphy (70th Pet.); Ptl. Harold Shermon (81st 
Pet.); Pll. Nicholas Porpon (102nd Pel.); Pll. Wal- 
ter C. Sehad (Trof. A); Ptl. Will McLeod (Trot. I). 



Published by the Police Department, 
City of New York. 

Copyright, 1952, by the Police Department, 
City of New York. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced 

in whole or in part without written permission 

from the editor. 

Address all communications to SPRING 3100, 
400 Broome Street, New York 13, N. Y. 



Letters 



From the Armed Services 



De 



Sir 



I wish to thank you and ail associated with 
SPRING 3100 for making it possible for me to 
receive this one good tie with the department at 
home. There are two members of the Los Angeles 
force with me who also enjoy reading it. . . . 
Respectfully, 
John J. DuPont 
CSA, USNCS, Guam. 
(Ptl. P.A.) 



From Air Crash Victim 

Dear Sir: 

Just a note to thank you policemen for all 
your aid after our accident in the bay yesterday. 
You were all most wonderful and most helpful! 
I shall never forget you all. I trust you realize 
what a joy it is to have fine folks to assist one at 
such a time. May the Lord bless you all! 
Sincerely, 

Eleanor M. Findlay, 
Boston, Mass. 



(Ed. Note: This note w^os received at the 109 
Pet. Miss Findlay was a passenger aboard the ill- 
fated airliner that crashed off La Guordia Field 
on January 15. Members of the 109th Precinct, 
Harbor Precinct and the Emergency Service Divi- 
sion participated in the rescue work.) 



From Out-of-Town 

Dear Sir: 

A few days ogo I had occasion to read the 
October and November issues of your magazine 
and I would like to say that I found it most edu- 
cational ond interesting. Until this time, I did not 
hove knowledge of the fact that a mogozine of 
thii type was edited by your department, ... I 
am writing this as on individual to ask if I can 
sub|:ribe to SPRING 3100 as I feel it would be 
a great help to me in my present studies dealing 
with the police profession. 

Sincerely your, 

Patrick L. Carroll, 

Ptl., Fairfield, Conn., P. D. 



(Ed. Note: We ore glod to have out-of-town 
low enforcement officers os subscribers to SPRING 
3100. Our rotes ore S2.16 in the United States 
ond S2.40 in foreign countries.) 



Memoranda 



MARCH 



3. GREATER NY POLICE POST, VFW, Meeting. 
Sokol Hall. 

6. ST. GEORGE ASS N. Meeting. Masonic Hall. 

7. ANCHOR CLUB. First Friday Moss. St. Fran- 
cis Church. 

10. NYC POLICE GARRISON, 3100. Meeting. 
Clubhouse. 

11. PBA. Deleaates' Meeting. Werdermonn Hall. 
POLICE SQUARE CLUB. Meeting. Masonic 
Temple. 

12. POLICEWOMEN'S ASS'N. Meeting. Hotel 
Biltmore. 

13. CAPTAINS' ASSN. Meeting. Hotel Commo- 
dore. 

15. Federal Income Tax due. 

17. St. Patrick's Day. 

SHOMRIM SOC. Meeting Riverside Pbza 
Hotel. 

18. COLUMBIA ASS'N, Meeting. Werdermonn 
Hall. 

N.Y.C. POLICE POST AL. Meeting 12 West 
62 St. 

23. CIVILIAN COUNCIL. Meeting. Trial Room. 
DETECTIVES' ASS'N. Meeting. Hotel Croydon. 

21. First day of Spring. 

25. SHERIDAN POST, AL. Meeting. Clubhouse. 

29. Sergeant's examination. 

3D HOLY NAME SOC. iBx., Mon., Rich.) Mass. 
St. Potrick's Cathedral. 



FRONT COVER 

PROMOTION. The dream cher- 
ished by all and achieved by the 
few. The examination at the end 
of this month will determine the 
sergeants of the next five years. 

(Photo by Detective James Mogner, 
Bureau of Public RelationsJ 



From 




esk on 



The Value of Study 

ON the last Saturday of this month, ahnost ten thousand patrohnen will sit 
down to an examination. The successful candidates will be eligible for promo- 
tion to the rank of sergeant. 

In my many years of association with police officers, I can recall a very 
common saying:— the first "jump" is the hardest. Numerically, at least, that is 
true. In an average four year period during which a civil service list is in existence, 
between four hundred and six hundred new sergeants will be appointed. Thus, 
for the five per cent, there will be success ; but for the ninety-five per cent, there 
will be disappointment. 

I use the word "disappointment" advisedly. It is not synonomous with "dis- 
couragement". Men who found themselves near the bottom or even off the last 
sergeant's eligible list will, because of diligent study and application, find them- 
selves near the top of the new list. Promotion in the Police Department comes to 
those who devote sufficient time to study and who are not easily diverted from 
their goal. 

In fact, study is an absolute essential for an efficient police officer— whether 
or not he ever achieves promotion. The Police Department, dealing as it does with 
human relationships and social conditions, is never static. From day to day and 
year to year, the pattern of social relationships undergoes varying changes, ^\'ith 
them comes an ever-increasing number of laws, regulations and procedures. 

The extent to which these various statutes have grown is indicated in an 
article in this issue of SPRING 3100 which discusses the coming sergeant's exani- 
ination. The scope of knowledge required of a candidate for police promotion is 
truly overwhelming. No man can hope to master the essentials by hit-or-miss dab- 
bling in the books. A solid 'oackground in criminal law, police procedures and 
scientific techniques requires constant application to assimilate the details. 

A retentive memory is also required of the officer because his activities are 
carried out in the field. In the stress of the emergency or problem, there is no 
opportunity to consult reference books. The man on the scene must draw upon 
the wealth of information that he has stored up within himself. Fortunately, an 
active brain seems to have no limitations as to the amount of information it can 
contain. 

Constant study permits the officer to add immeasurably to his font of know- 
ledge. It may be that the Municipal Civil Service Commission may choose questions 
of which he docs not know the answer. That can happen to the best of us. Be that 
as it may, it cannot detract from the vast store of knowledge on which he relies 
to carry out his dailv duties. Perhaps in this next examination, the questions will 
be more to his liking and preparation. 

Regardless of the outcome of the competition of ]\Iarch 29, the city's residents 
cannot help but profit. Their police officers, in carrying out the quest for personal 
advancement, are advancing the interests of the city. For each and every candidate, 
my wish is that your good luck is at least equal to your knowledge. 



C/eorgc /. f l/onagh 



an 

COMMISSIONER 



— 1 



ARREST OF GOLD SMUGGLERS 
WINS JOURNAL-AMERICAN A\»^ARI) 




Patrolman Joseph P. Lynch (right) with his mother, Mrs. Teresa Lynch, and Patrolman 
and Mrs. Henry M. Cronin receive the Journal-American Award from the Police Com- 
missioner. Awed by the proceedings are the two Cronin boys, Stephen, 3 and Daniel, 4. 



VTT'HKX tluy turned out for a 
4-to-12 last January 9, Patrolmen 
Henry M. Cronin and Joseph Lynch, 
26th Precinct, had no reason to look 
for anything but another routine tour 
of patrol. It was their lot that day to 
draw radio motor patrol summons 
duty. For about six hours or so, noth- 
ing happened to distinguish this par- 
ticular tour from any other. 

Then, at about 10 P.M. the}' came 
up with an arrest they won't soon 
forget. While cruising the Henry Hud- 
son Parkway near 95th Street, their 
attention was attracted to two cars in 
the parking field adjacent to the park- 
way. Because parking there is illegal 
during the hours of darkness, they 
decided to investigate. One of the cars 
raced away as the officers approached, 
and from the other, in which were two 
men and a woman, a small package was 
hurled into some nearby bushes. While 
Lynch went to retrieve the package, 
Cronin ordered the driver out of the 
car. As he was frisking him, the other 
man attacked. However, Lynch came 
quickly to his partner's aid and both 
men were easily subdued. 

A search of the car produced thirteen 



brown paper-wrapped packages similar 
to the one thrown from the car. In- 
spection showed that each package con- 



tained a metal bar, some of which were 
marked "crude gold" and the rest 
"U.S. Assay Office, Fine," A later ex- 
amination confirmed that the metal 
was pure .gold worth approximately 
$50,000. The men and woman were 
placed under arrest and taken to the 
26th Precinct where they were booked 
for violation of the United States Gold 
Reserve Act, Investigation disclosed 
that they had given false addresses 
when they were booked. In their actual 
residence in the Andrew Jackson 
Apartments on West End Avenue, an 
;ulditional hoard of gold worth more 
than $.^0,()()0 was discovered together 
with 845,300 in cash. 

It developed that the men were 
brothers and the woman was the wife 
of one of them. All three were recent 
immigrants. After they were booked, 
they were turned over to agents of the 
United States Secret Service, who said 
that the bars probably were intended 
for illegal export to a foreign country. 

Both officers are comparative new- 
comers to the department. Cronin was 
appointed on November 1, 1950 and 
Lynch was appointed on June 1, 195 L 
They received their Certificates of 
Honor on February 7 in a ceremony 
held in the office of the Police Com- 
missioner. 



Double Homicide Solved 




The officers involved in the speedy arrest of the killer of Mrs. Genevieve Mitchell and 
Frances Costello were immediately summoned to City Hall. Mayor Vincent R. Impellit- 
teri congratulates Inspector Edward Byrnes, Commanding Officer of the Bronx Detec- 
tives while Commissioner Monaghan and Chief Inspector Rothengost looks on. In the 
rear, left to right: Copt. Martin Donelon, Act. Copt. Joseph McLoughlin, Act. Lts. W. 
Fenn and H. Klein (hidden by Comm. Monaghan), and Dets. J. Murphy, R. Warren, N. 
Krieger, E. Nonnon, J. Kelly, S. McKeegan, R. Lauber and C. Foster. 




POLICE COMMISSIONER MONAGHAN "tries on" the new portable 
inhalotor assisted by Inspector Walter Klotzback and Acting Ser- 
geant Felix Hanratty of the Emergency Service Division. 

SERGEANT HANRATTY explains to Commissioner Monaghan the 

mechanics of the new device which is used for refilling sixteen cubic 

foot oxygen cylinders quickly and economically. 




Oxygen -Therapy Service 



THE Emergency Service Division, 
last month, introduced two new 
pieces of equipment designed to fur- 
ther improve oxygen-therapy service 
to the public. One is a device which 
is a faster, cheaper and safer method 
of filling the sixteen cubic foot oxygen 
cylinders which all emergency service 
patrol cars carry. The other is a twen- 
ty-eight pound portable inhalator re- 
placing the bulk}' sixty-eight pound 
inhalator formerly in use. Both pieces 
of equipment were designed and built 
by Acting Sergeant Felix Hanratty of 
the Emergency Service Division. 

As Inspector Walter E. Klotzback. 
commanding officer of the division, 
points out, emergency service patrol 
cars respond to all ambulance cases 
where a cardiac condition is indicated. 
In 1951, there were 12,844 such cases 
requiring the use of oxygen-therapy. 
Because of its mobility and speed, the 
emergency patrol car is usually at the 
scene before the ambulance arrives. 

To illustrate the speed with which 
help is available for these victims of 
heart attacks, Inspector Klotzback re- 
lated the story of the REP car team 
that was pulling up to a police call box 
to make its regular "ring" to the sta- 
tion house. The)' observed a man hang 
up the receiver and run down the block. 
Calling the operator, they were in- 
formed that a call had just been re- 
ceived for a cardiac. The address was 
nearby and the patrolmen sped to the 
scene bv a different route than that tak- 



en by the man who had made the call. 
They were in the apartment and admin- 
istering oxygen before he returned. 

Each REP car carries six sixteen 
cubic- foot cylinders : four contain 
oxygen and two carbogen. The pure 
oxvgen is used in cardiac, asthmatic 
and respiratory cases. The carbogen, 
which is a mixture of 93% oxygen 
and 7% carbon-dioxide is used to 
stimulate respiration in cases of as- 
phyxiation, gas-poisoning, submersion, 
electrocution and suffocation. It is re- 
placed by pure oxygen, once breathing 
has begun. The new device now per- 
mits the simultaneous refilling of 
eleven cylinders instead of eight. It 
takes two hours instead of five to re- 
fill the seventy cylinders used daily. 
This releases the men for other im- 
portant repair work in the Emergency 
Service Division's shop. 

Few other organizations use sixteen 
cubic foot cylinders and none uses them 
in the (luantity which the Emergency 
Service Division does. Because of this, 
there was no commercial device on the 
market to suit the needs of the divi- 
sion. The interest and ingenuity of the 
men in the division were responsible 
for the creation of the apparatus. 

The new device operates at a pres- 
sure of two thousand pounds, and can 
completely drain the 200 cubic foot 
tanks of oxygen where the former de- 
vice could not. As a result, there is a 
saving in the amount of oxygen used 
and fewer large cvlinders to handle — 



all of which makes for additional econ- 
omy. The old device is now being 
stored in another borough to be re- 
tained as a stand-by in the event of a 
major disaster. 

Another boon to the public is the 
invention of a lighter, portable inhala- 
tor also used with the sixteen cubic 
foot oxygen cylinders. The new in- 
halator weighs twenty-eight pounds as 
contrasted with the old sixty-eight 
pound inhalator. It is now being tried 
experimentally on Manhattan's East 
Side and in parts of Brooklyn where 
walk-ups and tenements predominate. 
It was found that much valuable 
energ\' was dissipated when the einer- 
gency men had to carry a hea\'y in- 
halator up four or five flights of stairs 
several times a day. In addition, it is 
easier to handle while the patient is 
being moved and oxygen-therapy must 
be continued. 

The new inhalator is made of alumi- 
num and works either on a demand 
or free flow system. The demand sys- 
tem uses oxygen onl)' when the patient 
inhales ; the free flow system calls for 
a constant flow of oxygen regulated 
by the operator. Under free flow op- 
eration, it will last about twenty min- 
utes. The new equipment, which will 
furnish better, quicker and cheaper 
oxygen-therapy service to the public 
whenever an emergency calls for it, 
demonstrates the department's interest 
in doing things more efficiently and 
economically. 



— 3 — 




Like many patrolmen. Matt Kurshals does most of his studying 

at home. His understanding wife helps by keeping the children 

owoy when dad concentrates on his books and studies. 



Police Academy classes are considered a "must" by 

patrolmen studying for promotion examinations. At this 

crowded morning class (after the late tour) Lieutenant 

Sanford D. Garelick is the instructor. 



Before he can begi 
study. Patrolman Kur 
makes sure his Mo 
of Procedure is uf 



D-DAY 





M.\RCH 29 will be greeted with mingled feelings 
of relief and apprehension by 9,617 patrol- 
men. As everybody in the department and 
everybody even remotely connected with the depart- 
ment knows, March 29 is the day of the examination 
for promotion to the rank of sergeant. 

Ever since late November when the examination 
was announced, a feeling of tension began to build 
up in the department. March 29 will relieve that 
tension for a while until rumors of the promulgation 
lit the list begin to circulate. No candidate considers 
himself successful until he sees his place on the list. 
The big question then becomes "Am I in the 
money?". For the uninitiated, this is translated to 
mean "Is my place sufficiently high on the list to 
guarantee my appointment?" There is no greater 
tragedy than to "die on the list," which results when 
a man is not reacheil by the time the list expires in 
four years. 

Out of a total eligible patrol and detective force of 
13,658, it has been announced that 9,617 have signi- 
fied their intentions of taking the examination. On 
the verv first day that applications were accepted by 
the Municijial Civil Service Commission, 1,391 men 
paid their $4.00 fee to file their apiilications. Date 
of filing is important. If two men with the same 
seniority, get the identical mark, date of filing for 
the exam becomes a factor in deciding their place 
on the list. 

There are no statistics but it is probably safe to 
estimate that a small proportion of the candidates 
have been studying diligentlv from the day they 
lUlered the department, and that a greater propor- 
tion began to cram on the day of the announcement 
I if the examination. Yet the vast majority have been 
hanl at the books for a year or more. 

Evervbody studies. Small groups of three or four 
u;et together and pool their joint knowledge. Classes 
at the Police Academy are filled to the bursting with 
nu'ii thirsting for knowledge. Many men su])pK-nKnt 

Group studying is a popular method of preparing for a 

promotion examination. In this study group, Detective 

Anthony Ceborski discusses a point with Patrolmen 

William Fey, Joseph Gangi and Kurshals. 



— 4- 




e|Mere he visits the office of SPRING 3100 
bl' the latest issue that will give him the 
(sidope on amendments to the Manual of 
rtedure and the Rules and Regulations. 




All aspiring sergeants check the tele- 
type sheets and mimeographed orders 
to keep abreast of latest changes in 
the department. 



these classes with attendance at private schools spe- 
cializing in police studies. At home, the fights and 
Hopalong on TV are ignored, as the candidate strug- 
gles to digest the rules. 

Mom keeps the kids quiet and fixes another pot of 
coiTee for her struggling student. She listens to him 
recite and helps him in the big job of getting his 
Manual up to date. Even getting ready to study is 
a big job, and for the hapless patrolman this con- 
sumes many precious hours. Each month he spends 
some hours, inserting in the Manual of Procedure 
the amendments which he gets from SPRING 
3100. (Plug!) 

The candidate for promotion will be expected to 
know the wording and meaning of : 

376 pages of the Manual of Procedure. 
435 Rules and Regulations 
154 pages of the City Charter (annotated) 
2,008 pages of the Administrative Code 

(annotated) 
1,397 pages of the Penal Law (annotated) 
1,564 pages of the Code of Criminal Procedure 

(annotated) 
390 pages of the Vehicle and Trafilic Law 

(annotated) 
197 sections of Trafilic Regulations 
149 pages of the Sanitary Code 
About 700 forms used in standard police pro- 
cedures — each one numbered differently. 
Countless files used in dififerent offices to retain 
these forms. 

Progressive police work subjects the foregoing 
to constant change, which does not make the lot of 
the candidate any easier. 

Because the examination may well include questions 
from every book on police techniques ever published, 
the patrolman hies himself to the Municipal Refer- 
ence Library to read the latest publications. Reports 
on proceedings, annual reports, conferences of police 
chiefs, everything becomes grist for the mill from 
\vhich the Civil Service Commission may draw ques- 
tions. Which to read, which to study, which to mem- 
orize, and which to safely discard are questions that 
torment the candidate as he selects his material. 



Miss Rebecca Rankin, librarian at the Municipal Ref- 
erence Library, helps our student by selecting some 
specialized books for him to read and study. 



Civil Service examinations have 
been been part of New York's person- 
nel practices since 1884. At that time 
the candidate for promotion was tested 
and judged on the following: writing 
from dictation; handwriting; knowl- 
edge of the Rules and Regulations ; fines 
and penalties for three years prior to 
examination ; arrests for twelve months 
prior to examination ; veracity ; habits 
as to use of liquor; ability and energy; 
coolness and judgment in emergencies ; 
deportment to citizens; memory for 
persons, places and dates; general 
knowledge of localities ; knowledge of 
United States Infantry Tactics and 
manual of the use of the club as au- 
thorized by the department. Sample 
questions asked in the examination of 
1906 were: 

What is a felony? A misde- 
meanor ? 

What are the rules regarding the 
use of tobacco and liquor? 
Add: 

487642 

3496 

847 

50674 

27 

8945 

As every potential sergeant knows, 
the questions are a lot stift"er to-day. 
The competition is keener but the prize 
is just as desirable. SPRING 3100 
hopes D-Day will be V-Day for a lot 
of studious, hard-working patrolmen ! 

March 29 is the fateful day for the 9,617 candidates for the sergeant's exami- 
nation. SPRING 3100 wishes its readers the very best of luck in the examination. 




Det. J. T. Corrigan 



PtI. L. Kitchman 



PtI. H. J. Sullivan 



PtI. W. J. Owens 



Ackerman 




GOOD WORK, MEN! 

Department Makes 373 Awards for 
Extraordinary Feats of Duty 




PtI. p. F. Hyland 



PtI. M. J. Filardo 



SUBWAYS, probationary patrolmen, and loaded y;uns played 
a large role in the 373 awards announced in General 
Orders No. 4 on January 21, 1952. In all, there were seven 
awards of Honorable Mention, eight of Exceptional Merit, 
115 of Commendation, 153 of Meritorious Police Duty, 
and 90 of Excellent Police Duty. 

The department's highest award, Honorable Mention, 
went to six patrolmen and a detective for their captures 
of guninen in three different cases. In each case, shots were 
exchanged but fortunately none of the officers were hit. 
One gunman was killed, another wounded twice and the 
third ^was captured unharmed. Five cases involving nine 
other officers were brought to successful conclusions with 
the capture of prisoners who had sought to escape in the 
subways. In the case of Patrolmen Edward W. Lehane 
and George E. Lucas, Jr., 103rd Precinct, the prisoner had 



nine patrolmen and two detectives were awarded Commen- 
dations. In numerous other cases, prisoners were disarmed 
of loaded guns but did not point them at the officers. 

Four probationary patrolmen, two of whom were ap- 
pointed to the department on June 16 and the others on 
June 29, distinguished themselves with good arrests within 
a short time of leaving the Police Academy. Probationary 
Patrolman Patrick T. ^Nloran, 9th Precinct, disarmed a man, 
who had been actitig suspiciously, of a loaded revolver. 
Probationary Patrolman Peter J. Coyle, 20th Precinct 
disarmed a burglar of a butcher knife. Another radio car 
team of Probationary Patrolman Thomas J. O'Reilly and 
Patrolman James H. McMahon, 103rd Precinct, appre- 
hended the occupants of a stolen automobile. The driver 
attempted to run down Patrolman ^IcMahon. Shots were 
tired at the escaping vehicle and the driver was wounded. 



just committed a homicide. 
They received a Commenda- 
tion as did Patrolman Joseph 
G. Egan. 15th Precinct; Pa- 
trolman James J. Byrne, 20tli 
Precinct; and Detective Jame- 
J. Hennessey, Bureau of Crim- 
inal Identification for other 
cases. Meritorious Police Duty 
awards went to Patrolmen 
Frank Cilento and Henry 
Prunkel, 34th Precinct, and 
Patrolmen Joseph Fink and 
Thomas F. Stewart, 40th Pre- 
cinct whose prisoners had 
sought the refuge of the sub- 
way after a burglary and rob- 
berj', respectively. 

Fifteen officers had loaded 
guns pointed at them but in 
each instance, the weapon mis- 
fired or the gunman was pre- 
vented from pulling the tricr- 
ger. Three patrolmen receive 



THREE AWARD WINNERS 




wP "^ ^ W^ "^ T 




ACTING LIEUTENANT JOSEPH P. MOLLOY (left) and Patrolman 
Thomas M. Doyle (right), both of the Juvenile Aid Bureau stop 
in to see their former partner, Sergeant James R. Lancaster, 
15th Precinct. Last October 29, while Lancaster was a patrol- 
man assigned to the J.A.B., a complaint was received that a 
man was molesting four boys in a hotel room. The trio surprised 
the suspect who drew a loaded revolver. After he was over- 
powered and disarmed, the man admitted having committed acts cinct. At about 3 :55 a.m.. July 
Exceptional Merit awards in of sodomy on the children and having engaged in a number of 20, 1951. while on radio motor 
these cases and a sergeant, burglaries. The three officers were awarded Commendations, patrol, were directed to th<r 



These four officers received 
awards of Meritorious Police 
Duty. Probationary Patrol- 
man Donald J. Kelly and his 
partner Patrolman Alfred 
Mandelbaum. 67th Precinct, 
were awarded Excellent Police 
Ihitv citations for subduing a 
burglar after a struggle on 
the roof of a building,'. 

The awards were : 
HONORABLE MENTION 

DF,Tiaii\i: Joseph T. Cor- 
ui<..\N, Shield No. 954. 44th 
Scjuad, Detective Division 
(was Patrolman. Shield No. 
12999, attached to 25th Pre- 
cinct at time of occurrence), 

I'.\TROI.M.\N I,I-.0 KlTCHM.\N, 

Shield No. 8423. Herbert J. 
Sri-i.iv.\N, Shield No. 11249, 
and Wir.i.i.\M J- Owens, 
Shield No. 19773. 25th Pre- 



— 6 



vicinity of 130th Street and Lexington Avenue, Manhattan, 
in response to a report that shots had been fired thereat. 
Upon arriving at the scene, the officers observed a man 
standing in front of premises 2152 Lexington Avenue, with 
a rifle in his hands. When ordered to drop the weapon and 
surrender, the gunman fired three shots at the officers and 
when the officers returned his fire the man ran into the area- 
way and took cover under the stoop of the building. During 
a further exchange of shots in which the gunman was 
wounded twice he then indicated he would surrender. After 
a violent struggle, the officers succeeded in disarming the 
gunman and placed him under arrest. A quantity of am- 
munition for the rifle was also found on his person. Inves- 
tigation disclosed that the prisoner had a short time 
previouslv attempted to shoot two men and had threatened 
his wife and children. The prisoner has a criminal record. 

Patrolman Henry L. Ackermann, Shield No. 2521, 
and Michael J. Filardo, Shield No. 18602, 47th Precinct. 
At about 12:05 a.m., June 4, 1951, were directed to prem- 
ises 2908 DeWitt Place, Bronx, where a man, apparently 
demented, had shot and wounded the owner of said premises 
when he attempted to admonish the man for making 
unnecessary noise and causing a disturbance in his apart- 
ment. The man had barricaded himself in the premises and 
was firing shots indiscriminately through the windows 
thereof. While Patrolmen Ackermann and Filardo were 
surveying the building, a window on the first floor in the 
rear of the premises opened and the man fired a shot at 
them. A short time later. Patrolman Filardo proceeded to 



EXCEPTIONAL MERIT 

ACTING LIEUTENANT 

Patrick J. Sullivan— 6th Sqd. 

DETECTIVE 

Larry Squires — 41st Sqd. 

PATROLMEN 

Harold L. Christensen — E.S.S. 4 
John Zottoli— 45th Pet. 
Gaetano T. Milano — 45th Pet. 
Jeremiah SulHvan — 45th Pet. 
Ernest J. Vohs— 19th Pet. 
John K. Sweeney — 19th Pet. 

COMMENDATION 

ACTING LIEUTENANTS 

Edward P. Boyle— 19th Sqd. 
John W. Muchow, Jr.— 84th Sqd. 
Joseph P. Molloy— J.A.B. 

SERGEANTS 

James R. Lancaster — 15th Pet. 
Howard A. Norton — 47th Pet. 
Matthew T. Redden— 22nd Pet. 
Thomas M. Henry— 77di Pet. 
Roy A. Hatem— 28th Pet. 
Richard Bothwell— 79th Pet. 
John P. Mink— 79th Pet. 

DETECTIVES 

James H. Harding — 32nd Sqd. 
Daniel J. Kelleher — 32nd Sqd. 
Eldridge VVaith— 32nd Sqd. 
Lawrence I. Hollander — 

82nd Sqd. 
Ira J. Schwartz — 82nd Sqd. 
Robbie Williams — Nar. Sqd. 
Nilo Mangrone — 23rd Sqd. 
Louis J. Behrens — 24th Sqd. 
lames T. Green — 19th Sqd. 
Robert Chapey— 100th Sqd. 
Tracey E. Smith — 20th Sqd. 



lohn T. Mull ins -16th Sqd. 
John T. Norris— 13th Sqd. 
"Toseph R. Harley- C.O.D.D. 
James J. Ward— 88th Sqd. 
Teremiah O'Connor — 42nd Sqd. 
Davis Wahl— 42nd Sqd. 
James J. Hennessey — B.C.L 
Albert Beron — 73rd Sqd. 
Robert H. McDermott— 

73rd Sqd. 
William F.Carey, Jr.— 34th Sqd. 
Rubin Herbstman — 34th Sqd. 
lames H. Marklev— 18th 
" Sqd. (2) 

Vincent P. Freaney — 18th Sqd. 
Vincent X. Murphy — 32nd Sqd. 
Benjamin F. Page — 32nd Sqd. 
Sylvester A. McCaskey — 

18th Sqd. 
Walter I. Rickard— 102nd Sqd. 
Tohn O'Neill— 8th Sqd. 
Peter J. Hynes, Jr.— 8th Sqd. 
Tames J. O'Connor — 17th Sqd. 
William T. Whalen, Tr. — 

17th Sqd. 

PATROLMEN 

Thomas M. Dovlc, T.A.B. 
Felix Koretsk-)^^7th Pet. 
Martin Kurke — 47th Pet. 
John J. Maire— 25th Pet. 
Joseph W. King. 77th Pet. 
Robert E. Monahan — 25th Pet. 
Charles E. Price, Jr.— 79th Pet. 
Charles H. Easlev— 79th Pet. 
Daniel P. Mangan— 17th Pet. 
Frank X. Maekev — E.S.S. 3 
Edward ]. Schmitt- E.S.S. 3 
Leo P. Shevlin— E.S.S. 18 
Frank X. Kellv— S2nd Pet. 
Tames T. Byrne— 20th Pet. 
Toseph T. Bvrne— 20th Pet. 
Edward H. Moubra\ — 20th Pet. 
Tames M. Mullin— 28th Pet. 
'William J. Horan— 8th Pet. 
(Continued on next page) 



the roof of a building directly across from said premises, 
while the gunman was exchanging shots with other officers 
at the scene. Upon seeing Patrolman Filardo, the gunman 
discharged another shot at him whereupon the officer dis- 
charged four shots and mortally wounded the gunman. 
Other officers who assisted in this case have been awarded 
in these orders. 

Patrolman Patrick F. Hyland, Shield No. 6755, 40th 
Precinct. At about 9:25 p.m., July 21, 1951, while on patrol 
duty, heard the report of gunfire and proceeded to the 
vicinity of 139th Street and Cypress Avenue, Bronx, 
where he observed a man suffering from a gunshot wound 
in the chest. Instructing a passerby to call for assistance, 
the officer set out in pursuit of the assailant. In front 
of premises 599 East 139th Street, the officer was informed 
by a group of men that the suspect had fled into an adjoin- 
ing vacant lot. The officer entering the lot and casting the 
beam of his flashlight about the area, discovered the gun- 
man crouched against a brick wall at the rear of the lot. 
Disregarding the officer's command to surrender, the gun- 
man scaled the wall and dropped ten feet into the rear 
yard of a tenement house. The officer fired a warning shot, 
bolstered his revolver and scaled the wall in pursuit. As 
the officer dropped to the ground, the gunman fired one 
shot at him. Quickly drawing his revolver and from a prone 
position the officer fired two shots in return in the direction 
of the gunflash. As the gunman ran frotn cover in an at- 
tempt to escape the officer seized him, struck him over the 
head with his service revolver, disarmed him of a loaded 
revolver, and placed him under arrest. 



SKY RESCUE 




I'aiVv Xc-u'S Phcio 



HIGH IN THE SUPERSTRUCTURE of the Queensboro Bridge, 
Patrolman Harold L. Christensen, Emergency Service Squad 
No. 4, grabs the leg of a man bent on committing suicide. 
Christensen won an Exceptional Merit for his part in rescue. 



— / 



AWARDS 

(Continued from page 7) 

John B. Shea— 77lh Pet. 
Andrew G. Mc Laughlin, Jr. — 

ISth Pet. 
Joseph G. Egan — 15th Pet. 
Joseph L. Goldberg— 24th Pet. 
Thomas V. Higgins^ — 24th Pet. 
Thomas F. Franz — 24th Pet. 
Huch C. O'Neil— 24th Pet. 
Walter J. Carlson— 32nd Pet. 
Daniel A. St. John— 32nd Pet. 
Jerome C. Flvnn — G.C.P. Pet. 
Milton Kletsky— 28th Pet. 
Michael C. Armstrong— 28th Pet. 
Frank La Forge, Jr.— 24th Pet. 
Walter C. Bentley— 24th Pet. 
Edwin W. Pollack— 62nd Pet. 
John McC. Larsen — 62nd Pet. 
Fred D. Lucas- 10th Div. 
Albert Alpern — 10th Div. 
Charles E. Leftwich— 10th Div. 
Samuel Rubenfeld — 23rd Pet. 
Joseph A. Geraci — 23rd Pet. 
William J. Grav— 80th Pet. 
Charles H. Allen— 80th Pet. 
George Rieu-Sieart— 28th Pet. 
Tames A. Worthy— 28th Pet. 
Charles L. Kelly— 24th Pet. 
Richard L. Beale, Jr.— 28th Pet. 
Arthur B. Hill— 28th Pet. 
Patrick T. Moran— 9th Pet. 
William T. Siegfried— 79th Pet. 
Harry Levine— 79th Pet. 
Francis T. Mulrooney — 10th Div. 
Joseph A. Healy— 10th Div. 
William Lundsten^Oth Pet. 
Alfred A. Thompson — 40th Pet. 
William H. Sinnigan— 10th Pet. 
Theodore J. Fetzer— 10th Pet. 
Nicholas F. Savino — 40th Pet. 
Paul ]. Tedesco-40th Pet. 
John P. Whalen— 32nd Pet. 
William F. Muldoon— 32nd Pet. 
Robert B. Groppe— 107th Pet. 
Louis Cepelak, Jr.- 109th Pet. 
Robert T. Walsh— 103rd Pet. 
James H. McMahon— 103rd Pet. 
George J. Roche — Sth Div. 
Melvin Loewenstein — 20th Pet. 
Jack Rosuck— 90th Pet. 
Louis E. Middelstorb— 25th Pet. 
Herbert Cantor— 19th Pet. 
Vernon G. Hodges, Jr.— 19th Pet. 
Edward W. Lehane— 103rd Pet. 
George E. Lucas, Jr. — 103rd Pet. 
Eugene E. Marron — 8Sth Pet. 

MERITORIOUS POLICE 
DUTY 

LIEUTENANTS 
James A. GrifTith — E.S.D. 
Harry Taylnr— S5lh Sq<\. 

ACTING LIEUTENANT 
James A. Brady — 47th Sqd. 

SERGEANTS 

Waller I. Sullivan— 88th Pet. 
Vincent W. ,\inbrose — M.S.R. 

ACTING SERGEANT 
Peter J. Dale— Bomb Sqd. 

DETECTIVES 

David Cohen — 73rd Sqd. 
Charles J. Engel — 73r(l Sqd. 
Sidney Wasscrman — 79lh Stjd. 
Joseph P. Cook— 85th Sqd. 
George Byrnes — 47th Sqd. 
.'Krthur C. Grubert-;47th Sqd. 
I'-dward T. Doran — 52nd Sqd. 
William J. Judge— 52nd Sqd. 



Francis A. Crowley — 40lh Sqd. 
Frank Pietromonaco— 

P.onib Sqd. 
Harold A. Jacob — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Patrick F. Connolly — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Kenneth F. Fagan — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Edward E. Erny — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Thomas F. Sullivan — Safe, 

Loft ;ni<I Truck Sqd. 
Richard II. Weber— Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
James J. Vinci — Safe, Loft and 

Truck Sqd. 
Kathryn B. Barry — Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
loseph 11. Whiteley— Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
Frank Turchiano — Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
lohn A. Francis — Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
Jerry Valente — Nar. Sqd. (2) 
Laurette C. McDonnell — Nar. 

Sqd. (2) 
Alfred B. Spinosa — Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
Tracev E. Smith— 20th Sqd. 
John T. Mullins— 16th Sqd. 
Nicholas F. Addrizzo — P.P. 

Sqd. 
lames Magowan, Jr. — Pick't 

Sqd. 
Tliomas A. Oliver — Pick't Sqd. 
Nicliulas F. Addrizzo — Pick't 

Sqd. 
James T. Cannon — Nar. Sqd. 
William E. Confrey — Nar. Sqd. 
William H. Owens — Nar. Sqd. 
Jay Charles — Nar. Sqd. 
Joseph E. Penna — Nar. Sqd. 
Benjamin F. Williams, Jr. — 

Nar. Sqd. 



Joseph R. Bailey— 106th Sqd. 
James T. Fulton — 106th Sqd. 
Robert Kappes-Bx. Yth. Sqd. 

(2) 
Edward G. Clarke— Bx. Yth. 

Sqd, (2) 
Eugene H. Becker — Photo. Bur. 
Samuel Bress— 16th Sqd. 
Lawrence W. Callow — 16th Sqd. 
Richard F. Sinnott— 16th Sqd. 
George W. Simtuons — Bal. Sqd. 
Louis J. Danna — Nar. Sqd. 
John C. Macauley — Nar. Sqd. 
Martin J. Zinkand — 23rd Sqd. 
Frank A. Malerba — 23rd Sqd. 
Vincent J. HefTeren — 23rd Sqd. 
Aubrev Ferguson — • 

Bx.Yth. Sqd. 

PATROLMEN 

James D. Gannon — E.S.S. 4 
John R. Browne — 47th Pet. 
Tames M. Hollywood — 22nd Pet. 
Theodore W. Weise, Jr. — 

46th Pet. 
James A. Shand— 30th Pet. 
Vincent A. Grant — 24th Pet. 
Edwin F. Conroy, Jr. — 42nd Pet. 
Joseph D. Rago— 42nd Pet. 
Ernest J. Vohs— 19th Pet. 
John K. Sweeney — 19th Pet. 
Robert E. Pelletier— 82nd Pet. 
Charles Giglio— 82nd Pet. 
Moe Plotkin— 28th Pet. 
James T. Brown— 28th Pet. 
Joseph A. Lo Menzo — 13th Pet. 
Charles A. Schwarz — 13th Pet. 
Nathan Ury— 13th Pet. 
Wesley E. Van Wallandael — 

13th Pet. 
Leroy M. LeCavalier— 108th Pet. 
Edward S. Ruoff— 63rd Pet. 
Edward G. Goldbach— 61st Pet. 
Colin C. Stewart— 48th Pet. 
Martin F. Fitzgerald— 48th Pet. 
Tames F. Kelly— 14th Pet. 



FORMER PARTNERS 




DETECTIVE CHARLES L KELLY is congratulated by his former 
radio motor patrol partner. Patrolman Joseph Fink, 24th Pre- 
cinct, on his assignment to the Detective Division. Kelly was 
awarded a Commendation for making two arrests within a 
matter of minutes. Last September 5, he and Fink arrested two 
men for stealing a vacuum cleaner and clothing from a parked 
automobile. Enroute to the station house, they received a radio 
message of an armed man threatening to shoot another on the 
third floor of a dwelling in their sector. While Fink guarded 
the prisoners, Kelly went in and disarmed the man. Fink was 
awarded a Meritorious Policy Duty for his part in the two arrests. 



Alister N. Crichton— ISth Pet. 
James J. Mullany, Jr.— 15th Pet. 
Arthur V. Wallace— 16th Pet. 
Julian J. T.ewis — 82nd Pet. 
Daniel J. McCarthy— 76th Pet. 
Harold T. Garguilo— 47th Pet. 
Donald "S. Collins— 10th Pet. 
Edward C. Dean— 10th Pet. 
Toseph F. McClellan— 7th Pet. 
"Robert A. Danner— 77th Pet. 
Vincent T. Solomita— 77th Pet. 
Edward T. Davis— 24th Pet. 
Charles j. Kelly— 24th Pet. 
Donald T. Harding— 103rd Pet. 
Robert D. Miller— 103rd Pet. 
Joseph E. McBride — Har. Pet. 
Isidore T. Geisser — 13th Pet. 
Joseph Fink— 40th Pet. 
Thomas F. Stewart-^Oth Pet. 
George A. Meyer— G.C.P. Pet. 
Earl H. Metz— 120th Pet. 
Raymond L. Jones — 23rd Pet. 
Daniel G. O'Leary— 23rd Pet. 
Vincent E. R. Peppard— 80 Pet. 
Casimir T. Kaminski — 80th Pet. 
Ralph Sell ranz— 23rd Pet. 
George L. Stagliano— 23rd Pet. 
Thomas J. Elliott— 23rd Pet. 
Joseph A. O'Neil, Jr.— 102 Pet. 
Toseph Sedacca — Traf. C. 
Toseph Fink— 24th Pet. 
Frank Cilento— 34th Pet. 
Henry Prunkel— 34th Pet. 
Frank F. Manno— 79th Pet. 
Tack Merker— 79th Pet. 
John H. Rice— 42nd Pet. 
Robert C. Johnson — 42nd Pet. 
John T. Dowd— 81st Pet. 
Tames F. Doll— 81st Pet. 
James H. McMahon— 103rd Pet. 
Thomas T. O'Reilly- 103rd Pet. 
Ralph Kaufman— 24th Pet. 
Tames A. Poulos — 41st Pet. 
Peter J. Coyle— 20th Pet. 
John Ivatopodes— 20th Pet. 
"Tames T. Walsh-E.S.S. 19 
Tohn H. Schaller— 77th Pet. 
Patrick M. Rogers— 77th Pet. 
Robert T. O'Sullivan— 16th Pet. 
Robert "E. Donnelly— 16th Pet. 
Theodore A. Marchlevski — 

16th Pet. 
Tames T. Casserly- 11th Pet. 
"Rudolph C. Motl— 108th Pet. 
Robert T. Ross— 108th Pet. 
Toseph t. H. Miller— 16th Pet. 
James P. Rath— 14th Pet. 
Joseph P. Donagh\ — 14th Pet. 
John D. Forget— 78th Pet. 
Thomas T. Lawrence, Jr. — 

78th Pet. 
Wilson C. Kenney— 79th Pet. 
Clarence E. Robertson — 

79th Pet. 
Henrv V. MeCatTerty— 24th Pet. 
Theodore J. Bevers— 75th Pet. 
Raymond A. Burbige— 75th Pet. 

EXCELLENT POLICE DUTY 

CAPTAIN 

John J. Pcndcrgast -Traf. A. 

LIEUTENANT 

T.Tin R. Ilu^N.Mi. 7ih S.id. 

ACTING LIEUTENANTS 

Tohn F. Shanley— 112th Sqd. 
Charles F. Jone«— 2Sih Sqd. 

SERGEANTS 

Stanley W. Koutnik— O.C.I. 
Tames'N. Whcallev— 10th Pet. 
John W. Delchanty— 110th Pet. 
(Continued on page 29) 



— 8 



TOP COMMAND 



SKETCHES OF TOP-RANKING MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 



BLOOM iNGDALE Trophy winner for the highest general 
average as a recruit in the Police Academy in 1927, 
Inspector John E. Godfrey went on to write the highest 
nunt.il \iA\irr nn the sergeant's examination in 1936. . . . 
I ^^^^ . Brought up in the lower end of the 

I ^^BP^ii. Bronx after being born in Harlem, 

^^^ he received his education at St. 

Luke's Parochial School, Public 
School 9, and Stuyvesant High 
School. . . . His father was a railroad 
man and before joining the depart- 
ment, the inspector, too, was em- 
ployed by the New York, New 
Haven and Hartford Railroad. . . . 
Unmarried, he makes his home in the 
John E. Godfrey Parkchester section of the Bronx 

with his mother, Mrs. Margaret Godfrey. . . . For diver- 
sion he likes baseball (Yankee fan) and swimming. Hold- 
ing an Excellent Police Duty citation, his background in- 
cludes service in the patrol and detective branches in the 
boroughs of Bronx, Manhattan and Brooklyn where he 
now heads the 20th Division. . . . He was promoted to ser- 
geant on June 20, 1937, to lieutenant on September 26, 
1940, to captain on November 23, 1946 and to deputy in- 
spector on July 1, 1948. He attained his present rank on 
February 15, 1951. 




HAXiXG the distinction of wartime service with two^dif- 
ferent branches of the Armed Forces, Inspector 
Daniel W. Lake, who heads the Uth Division in the Bronx, 
is still active as an army reserv'e officer. . . . His father 
was an electrical engineer in the rail- 
road industry and his grandfather, 
also Daniel Lake, was at one time 
auditor of the old cit\' of Brooklyn 
and was a United States Marshal at 
the time of his death in 1891. . . . 
Born in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, the 
inspector's schooling included Public 
School 10 at Prospect and Seventh 
Avenues, Manual Training High 
School and St. Leonard's Academy. 
Daniel w. Lake . . . Formerly a fingerprint expert 

with the New York City Magistrates Courts, he did a 
hitch with the Navy from 1917 to 1921, serving as a chief 
yeoman in Washington and later aboard the USS Iowa. . . . 
With the coming of World War II, he traded his blues 
for olive drab and served as a major in army intelligence. 
. . He and his wife, Margaret, married in 1916 have a 
daughter, Florence, now Mrs. Henry Steiner. ... A vet- 
eran of police dut}' in every borough but Richmond, he was 
assigned to the Detective Division's Bureau of Criminal 
Identification from 1922 to 1936. . . . Holder of an Excel- 
lent Police Dutv award, he entered the department on Janu- 
ary 11, 1921. 




NSPECTOR Thomas McLoughlin, commanding officer 
of the 16th Division in Brooklyn, is a thirty-three year 
veteran of the department. His service has included periods 
with the patrol and traffic force, and as a superior in charge 
of the Cabaret Bureau of the Divi- 
sion of Licenses. ... A native of 
County Longford, Ireland, he emi- 
grated to America when he was nine- 
teen. He attended night sessions of 
Brooklyn Commercial High School. 
... In 1917 he enlisted in the 69th 
Regiment (which later became the 
165th Infantry) of the famed Rain- 
bow (42nd) Division. During World 
War I he ser^^ed as a sergeant in the 
Lorraine, Chateau Thierry, Meuse 
Argonne and Sedan campaigns and subsequently in the 
Army of Occupation at Remagen on the Rhine. . . . He 
and his wife, Josephine, a high school teacher, live on 
Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn. Their son Thomas, Jr., 22, is 
now attending the University College of Medicine of Coun- 
ty Cork, Ireland. A graduate of Fordham, he also ser\'ed 
as a member of the Medical Company of the 165th Infantry 
for three years. . . . Inspector McLoughlin is a member of 
the Rainbow Veterans, the Catholic War Veterans, the 
Sheridan Police Post of the American Legion, as well as 
the Holv Name Societv and the Police Anchor Club. 




Thomas McLoughlin 



FOLLOWING the career of his father, a former lieutenant 
in the 1st Precinct, Inspector William J. McGowan, Jr., 
is now in command of Manhattan's 5th Division. ... A 
product of East Harlem, he attended Public School 24 at 
Madison Avenue and 128th Street, 
and later the High School of Com- 
merce. . . . Employed in the building 
construction field as a marble cutter 
efore joining the department, he 
ilso served in World W'ar I aboard 
I he L^SS South Dakota on troopship 
convoy duty. . . . With his wife, the 
former Mary Hammer, he makes his 
home in the Pelham Baj' Park sec- 
tion of the Bronx. They are the par- 
wiiiiom J. McGowan ents of two girls. Jane, the elder, is 
now Mrs. John Coffin. Kathleen, a graduate of Villa Maria 
Acadmy, is a student at the Franklin Art School on 57th 
Street. . . . He has performed service in the patrol and 
plainclothes branches as well as in the Hack Bureau of the 
Division of Licenses and the Harbor Precinct. . . . He also 
captained a motorcycle precinct. . . . Promoted to inspector 
on August 15, 1950, he holds an Excellent Police Duty 
citation. 




— 9 




THE STAFF OF SPRING 3100 is recruited 
from the ranks of the force. As experi- 
enced police officers, they have the back- 
ground, training and approach necessary 
to understand their readers' needs. 



THIS March, SPRING 3100 celebrates its coming of 
age with its twenty-tirst birthday. Having grown up, 
we invite our readers to come behind the scenes and 
watch the planning and preparation necessary to put out a 
magazine devoted to the interests of policemen. 

This article, for instance, was written in December. 
Even before it was written, a good deal of time had gone 
into planning, discussion, and consideration of the idea. 
After it was written, it had to go through many more 
hands before it appeared in the magazine. 

Basically, SPRING 3100 performs two major func- 
tions. Its primary purpose is to serve as an educational 
tool, presenting police techniques and mechanics in a man- 
ner that will make every police officer a better law en- 
forcement agent. Side by side with this important objective, 
are the day-to-day activities of 19,000 men who, working 
together, create a community of interest that forms an im- 
portant part of their lives. Through its house-organ cul- 
umns, such as "Looking 'Em Over," Awards, Promotions 
and "All in the Day's Work," SPRING 3100 brings its 
readers intimate news of the men and women in the de- 
partment. In short, SPRING 3100 strives for only one 
goal — to be what the slogan on its cover says it is : — "A 
Magazine for Policemen." 

The task of determining the contents of an issue is one 
of selectivity. There is very little published literature on 
the actual work of a patrolman or a detective, although 
much has been written on the scientific or legal aspects of 
his work. Limited to forty pages, SPRING 3100's prob- 
lem is to select the most important subjects from the thou- 
sands of possibilities. 



Accordingly, each article to be included must pass sev- 
eral tests. First : Is the article of general interest ? Will it 
attract the attention of the majority of our readers? Sec- 
ondly: What is the educational value of the article? Will 
it help in the every day performance of the job? Does it 



WRITING FOR SPRING 3100 is only a small part of the job. 
The production problems are many and require attention 
by staff members. Extreme left, galleys are corrected, edited 




10 — 



broaden the police background of the average patrohnan? 
Is it helpful as study material for promotion examinations? 
If the proposed article passes these preliminary prob- 
ings, the question then arises : What is the best way to pre- 
sent the material? Shall it be through photographs or 
diagrams, or a combination of both? Shall we write an 
essay or make a listing? Is the subject matter "serious," 
requiring formal writing — or is a little levity warranted and 
the writing can be informal? These problems resolved, the 
article is then assigned to one of the staff reporters for 
writing. 

The SfafF 

SPRING 3100's staff is composed of experienced writers 
and production people drawn from the ranks of the force. 
Each is a specialist with a solid police background. The 
editor, Frank D. Doyle, has sixteen years of professional 
newspaper experience behind him. 

The staff' operates as does that of any other publication. 
Policy and direction are indicated by the Commissioner, his 
top aides and the editor. Reporters are assigned to research 
and writing. Photographers go along to "make" the pictures. 
A "production" man working with the staff' artist plans 
the "layout" of the forty-page issue. The whole process is 
supervised bv the "blue-pencilling" of a superior officer 
whose responsibility it is to coordinate the activities of the 
staff. 

SPRING 3100 has certain problems which the writer 
for the "slicks" does not have. The average writer of police 
stories is interested only in getting a good "blood and thun- 
der" version of police activities. While that kind of writing 
makes for easy reading, it cannot serve the purpose of 
SPRING 3100. The magazine must be accurate down to 
the last, most unimportant detail. It must be consistent 
with all the Rules and Regulations and the Manual of Pro- 
cedure of the department. It cannot "fluff" over details 
to make a "good" story, if in doing so it conveys an in- 
accurate impression of actual procedures and methods. The 
magazine in the past two years has achieved new heights 
as an authority on police techniques by just such careful 
attention to detail. 



Research and Development 

The police reporter to justify this authoritative position 
plans his articles carefully. Generally, his first step is to 
"research" the facts through studying the Annual Reports 
back to 1880 or earlier. From these, he gleans his basic 
background which points out needs, beginnings, and de- 
velopment of the particular field in which he is interested. 
This basic research may lead him to other sources of in- 
formation such as the back issues of the New York Times, 
the picture file at the Fifth Avenue Library, Harper's 
Weekly Magazine of the 1800's, Valentine's Manual, the 
Old Record Room, and the New York Historical Society. 
As has been indicated, written records are sparse and occa- 
sionally the writer is forced to the extreme of depending 
upon the recollections of an "old-timer" who is still in the 
job or retired. They are able to furnish interesting first- 
hand material to round out the article. 

Having completed his basic research, the writer visits 
the command about which he is writing. In conference 
with the commanding officer, the details of the article are 
worked out. Generally, each command has a message it 
wishes conveyed to the force and this message is high- 
lighted and stressed in the finished article. In each instance, 
the article will convey certain specific instructions for 
greater cooperative eft'ort between the specialized command 
and the patrolman on the force. In this way, the patrolman 
not only understands the workings of all commands, but is 
able to intelligently relate his activities to the all-over pat- 
tern of the department's work. 

Coincidentally with the direct study of the subject, pic- 
tures are made by staff' photographers. Shots are made on 
the basis of the information and teaching they can convey. 
In some articles, particularly the "how to do" series, the 
photographic emphasis predominates with a series of step- 
by-step illustrations, which show the police officer how a 
particular technique is performed. 

When the article is written, it is checked by the com- 
manding officer or other authority on the subject, and his 
recommendations are incorporated. The article is then 
read bv the editor for final changes after which it is ready 
to be "laid out." 

(Continued on nexf page) 



and marked with proofreader's marks before being put in page 
proof form. Next left, "layout" man scales pictures to conform 
to layout and amount of type to make a pleasing page. In the 



next photo, the printer checks the cover picture for color 

register and alignment. Extreme right, magazine is distributed 

at the precinct station houses to members of the force. 




SPRING 3100 fConfinued; 




SPRING 3100 has a wide circulation among other police agencies ancJ 
police personnel. Mailing is handled by the staff personnel on equip- 
ment devised to speed up the process. 

LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES in New Zealand, India, England, 

Japan, Canada and Australia are just a few that have reprinted articles 

which appeared in SPRING 3100. Careful attention to detail has made 

SPRING 3100 a recognized authority on police techniques. 




Production 

The production department now gets busy arranging the 
material for presentation in the magazine. Such factors as 
kind of type, arrangement on page, space allotment, size 
of photographs and illustrations are resolved here. The 
article is then sent to the printers for type-setting and re- 
turned for proof-reading, a chore in which the whole staff 
participates. 

A rough issue of the magazine is made ready in "page- 
proof" form. Copies are then distributed to the offices of 
the Police Commissioner, the First Deputy Commissioner, 
the Chief Inspector, and the Chief of StaiT. Comments and 
recommendations from each office are incorporated in the 
final editing. When all this is accomplished, the magazine 
is ready for printing, after which it is distributed to the 
force. 

Each member of the staff also has charge of various 
sections or columns of the magazine which are a regular 
feature. Letters, the calendar. Top Command, amendments, 
Looking 'Em Over and others are all assigned to individual 
reporters who are responsible for its appearance each month. 
In this way, responsibility and continuity are fixed, mak- 
ing for better service to readers. 

SPRING 3100 maintains a library of exchange maga- 
zines from all over the world. News of interest, new 
techniques and interesting cases are gleaned from these 
police magazines and are made available to our readers. 
SPRING 3100 has been honored by having many of its 
articles reprinted in all parts of the world, and our techni- 
cal articles frequently serve as source material for manv 



writers interested in police work. With each issue, 
SPRING 3100 strives to advance the tone and style of the 
magazine, in order to make it a basic professional text for 
the patrolman. 



Dollars (In Dope) Go Up In Smoke 




SEIZED NARCOTICS, valued in the illicit market at $631,965, 
were burned in the basement of Police Headquarters Annex on 
January 22. Left to right. Captain Peter E. Terranova of the 
Narcotic Squad, Chief Inspector Conrad H. Rothengast, and 
Police Commissioner George P. Monaghan help to feed the fur- 
nace with seventeen ounces of opium, seventy-five ounces of 
heroin, 1,065 marijuana cigarettes, 205 hypodermic needles and 
a large variety of other drugs and equipment seized during 1951. 



12- 




The Old Forty-Niner 
Digs For The Story 



FROM: The Old Forty-Niner. 

TO: You. 

SUBJECT: BLOOD — AND DAN MURPHY. 

The Old Forty-Niner is a slave to the printed word; he is the type who 
will read anything. Over his breakfast, he reads the instructions on his 
cereal box on how to send in a box top and get a Dick Tracy magic-eye, 
supersonic ring. In the subway he carefully reads the ads as though they 
were required reading for the sergeant's exam and he has been known to get 
lost for an hour when he went to look for a number in the telephone direct- 
ory. Now, he had before him a copy of Bureau of Orders release No. 20 issued 
January 16, 1952. "Police Department Blood Program," the Old Forty-Niner 
read. "The response has been gratifying but still insufficient." 

"I'll bet there's nothing so 'insufficient' as blood that isn't there," he 
thought. "Hey, chief," he called aloud to the Editor. "What's this about an 
insufficient blood program? I thought we were moving right along on that." 

"We had been but I guess that everyone is bogged down in studying or some- 
thing. At any rate, there is a slight lag in the department's contributions. 
Too bad. Incidentally, when did you give blood last?" Old Forty-Niner had 
the grace to blush and hang his head. Outside of an occasional attack of 
indigestion from overeating and an ulcer that he considered an occupational 
trade mark. Old Forty-Niner was in good health and like so many others, rarely 
thought about illness and doctors. 

The Editor continued, "Say, didn't you cover that story of Dan Murphy in 

(Continued on page 29J 




The Life Line 

Detective Daniel Murphy is shown in 
Roosevelt Hospital on July 8, 1947 
the day after he was shot. A stafF 
doctor is giving Dan one of the many 
blood transfusions he received. 



Daily News Photo 



M J^h The hatf J Wctk 



np wo real estate operators, posing 
•^ as police officers, tried to sell a 
liill of goods to a pretty model, and 
were thwarted when Lieutenant 
James Shiehls of the 17th Precinct 
literally caught up with them. After 
anempting to intimidate the girl, the 
two flashed phony shields, and "ar- 
rested" her. They made the mistake 
of driving the girl in a cab to the 
17th Precinct. 

^ hen the cah stopped, the model 
ran into the station house and ex- 
plained the situation to Lieutenant 
Shields on desk duty. Rushing from 
behind the desk, the lieutenant ran 
to the street and by some fancy leg- 
work caught up with the cab as it 
stopped for a light at the corner. 
The two men claimed it was all a 
joke, but are not laughing now. They 
were charged with impersonating po- 
lice officers. 

" * * * 

A 76-YEAR-OLD paralyzed man owes 
his life to Patrolmen Arthur 
Stoecker and Stanley Vitkavage of tlu 
81st Precinct. On January 26. a fire- 
broke out in the tenement in which the 
invalid lives. The man's daughter tried 
valiantly to lift him from his bed, but 
was not equal to the task. She ran 
screaming down three floors to the 
street where she was met by the two 
patrolmen. Guided by the young 
woman, Stoecker and Vitkavage made 
their way through the smoke-filled, 
burning building and rescued the oM 
man. All four required treatment fm 
smoke poisoning. 



\ PENCHANT for high-powered, lux- 
-^*- ury cars led to the capture of 
four gangsters who had participated 
in twenty-one hold-ups in less than 
three months. As the gang made its 
get away from a liquor store from 
which they had taken $210. an 



alert passerby copied part of their li- 
cense number. Tracing it was facilitated 
because the witness noted it was a big 
car, "like a Cadillac." Tentative owner- 
ship was established and Detectives 
John 0'P)rien and James Oleska, 64th 
Squad, camped on the doorstep of the 
car's owner. They nabbed him when 
he drove home in the early hours of the 
morning. Three otlu-rs were taken 
into custody to complete the roundup. 

=j« * * 

"r>ECAUSE Patrolmen Joseph Lucas 
-*-^ and George Geisler of the 122nd 
Precinct don't believe in ghosts, two 
hoys were saved from death by suf- 
focation. On RMP duty, January 20, 
the men heard muffled cries coming 
from an abandoned roadster in a 
vacant lot. Thev could see no one, 
but began investigating. 



In the closed rumble seat, they 
found two hoys who had been locked 
in for twelve hours. The boys ex- 
plained they had been hiking when 
it began to rain and they had crawled 
into the rumble seat for cover, acci- 
dentally locking themselves in. Their 
frantic shouts and cries went unheed- 
ed in the deserted .section until the 
police arrived. The boys, none the 
worse for their adventure, were re- 
turned to their parents. 
* * * 

TTTHEN Patrolmen George Barlow 
^ ^ and Thomas Magar, 106th Pre- 
cinct, flagged down a car in Ozone 
Park for a minor traffic violation, they 
wound up with the answer to seven 
hold-ups and four auto thefts. The 
driver of the car ignored the order to 
stop. He stepped on the gas and the 



ESCAPE FROM FIRE. Patrolman Stephen Kud- 
less of the 120th Precinct helps on injured wo- 
man to an ambulance. When fire swept o three- 
story building, he rescued her by taking her 
down a ladder from a second-story window. 

<. / AJiaiu-c Phot,' 



CHEATING DEATH. Emerger 
Service patrolmen resuscitate t 
members of a family who had b£ 




— 14 — 



chase was on. The race ended a few 
blocks away when the fleeing car 
smashed into a tree. 

One man managed to escape, but the 
driver was apprehended. He not only 
furnished the name and address of his 
accomplice, who was brought in quick- 
ly, but confessed to a series of hold-ups 
and car thefts in the area. The men 
had tried to evade the police officers 
because they thought they were being 
picked up for a hold-up they had com- 
mitted an hour before their arrest. 



T-^ETECTIVES of the 84th Squad 
-'-^ caught up with the burglar- 
rapist who for several days had ter- 
rorized residents of two Brooklyn 
hotels. Detectives Michael Arrasate 
and Michael Willis were stationed in 
a room in one of the hotels and be- 
gan the long wait for the burglar to 
repeat his pattern. Nights of patient 
waiting paid off on January 20 when, 
as had been anticipated, the burglar 
entered the room from a fire escape. 
Instead of a lone woman, the burglar 



was confronted with two alert detec- 
tives who quickly disarmed hiiu and 
placed him under arrest. 

A search at the station house dis- 
closed that the man was wearing 
two pair of pants and four shirts — 
not as protection against the cold but 
as protection against identification. 
He explained he would change his 
clothes to confuse witnesses who hap- 
pened to observe him during the 
flight. The burglar was identified by 
two women whom he raped during 
his robberies. He admitted twenty- 
five robberies in a period of four 
months. 

■pROViNG the theory that dope addic- 
-^ tion leads to crime. Narcotic Squad 
detectives smashed a ring of drug- 
using criminals following the arrest 
of a seller in Manhattan. Detective 
Clifford E. Callwood set the stage by 
making contact with the seller. Under 
the supervision of Lieutenant John P. 
McCarthy and Acting Lieutenant Ar- 
thur M. Grennan, Detectives John J. 
Fleming, Francis T. Meehan and Rob- 



phyxiated as a result of a gas 

jk. Quick, efficient action saved 

the lives of both 



victims. 

Daily Mirror Photo 



SURPRISE! Patrolmen John Delaney and 
Thomas Costello, 103rd Precinct search a burg- 
lar caught in the act of ransacking an apart- 
ment. Burglar, who hails from another state, 
seems surprised at N. Y. C. police efficiency. 

L. I. Puss ri!.'to 




crt McLaughlin kept the seller under 
observation. After his arrest, two 
loaded guns were found in the prison- 
er's home, but he insisted they be- 
longed to somebody else. With a 
meager description, the detectives 
scouted the neighborhood and picked 
up the other man a few blocks away. 
He implicated sev^eral others, and eight 
arrests resulted in a few hours. The 
gang admitted participating in a series 
of armed robberies that had terrorized 
the neighborhod. All are awaiting trial. 



AFTER Samuel Smith helped three 
of his friends rob a man of $460, 
he took his share of the receipts and 
(1) opened a savings account and (2) 
bought a new hat. It was the new 
hat that gave him away because he 
had left his old one at the scene of 
the hold-up. Detectives Francis Wal- 
lace and Kenneth Shields, 48th 
Squad, spotted him wearing the new 
hat and when questioned, he broke 
down and admitted the theft. 



PATROLMEN Nester Barbier and 
Jerry Stephan of the 114th Pre- 
cinct were cruising their Astoria post 
on RMP duty when they heard a re- 
peated beep-beep of a taxi horn. In- 
vestigating, they found that the cabbie 
had sounded his horn as an SOS call 
when his passenger attempted to hold 
him up. Instead of handing over his 
money, the hack driver had slumped 
in his seat and sounded off on the 
horn. The hold-up man fled. 

The patrolmen set out with the cab- 
bie and together they patrolled the 
neighborhood. Within a few minutes, 
they spotted their man and apprehend- 
ed him. The prisoner had made a 
specialty of robbing cab drivers and 
confessed to three other hold-ups. 



Tx breaking up a fight between two 
A men. Patrolman .Arthur Parker, 
28th Precinct, found himself the target 
of a gun, wielded by one of the brawl- 
ers. Returning the fire, Patrolman 
Parker overpowered the gunman, and 
placed him under arrest. In the man's 
room, 151 packets of heroin were 
found. He was charged with violation 
of the Sullivan law, selling dope and 
two counts of felonious assault. 

(Continued on next page) 



— 15 — 



ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK 

(Conlinuedi 

MAKY S HAM. IV, of llic I'ickpocket 
and Coiitidence S(|uad was al- 
most caught in a sqiK'czc play, when 
she arrested two women for shoplift- 
ing. The evidence, when uncovered, 
turned out to be a fur coat which one 
of the thieves had concealed about her 
person. In court, the defendant's at- 
torney ridiculed the charge saying it 
was impossible for a woman to con- 
ceal a bulky item like a fur coat in a 
girdle. District Attorney James Mc- 
Gratten rose to the challenge and in 
open court before an all-male jury, 
squirmed into the girdle and success- 
fully hid the coat beneath it. The jury 
returned a unanimous verdict of 
"guilty." Mary Shanley breathed a re- 
laxed sigh of relief. 



A TRAIL of pennies, nickels and 
dimes blazed a path on Brook- 
lyn streets which Patrolman Edward 
Fitzsimmons, 82nd Precinct, followed 
when passersby told him that some- 
one had stolen a March of Dimes 
charity box from a downtown store. 
The chase, to Fitzsimmons' surprise, 
ended when he caught up with a 
fleet-footed nine-year-old youngster 
who admitted having stolen the box. 
In the child's pocket was a small claw 
hammer which he had used to break 
the store window. The boy was ar- 
raigned in Brooklyn Children's Court. 



P.vrROLMAN Edward Gianniatasio 
assigned to "light duty" went into 
heavy action at 4 A.M., January 22 
while on duty in Police Headquarters. 
A cabbie rushed into the rotunda and 
told Gianniatasio that a passenger had 
attempted to hold him up. Instead of 
complying, he jumped out of his taxi 
and raced into headquarters. 

When Gianniatasio and the driver 
rushed back to the cab, it was empty. 
Together they began to cruise the 
neighborhood. A few blocks away, they 
found their man and Gianniatasio 
placed him under arrest. Gianniatasio, 
winner of the Combat Cross, has been 
assigned to the Light Duty Squad l^e- 
cause of injuries suiifered when he was 
shot twice in capturing a hold-up man 
in 1949. 



16- 





PATROLMEN ROCCO FORTUNATO AND WILLIAM BRAUN, 74th Precinct, complete 

their mission of rescuing two boys who hod fallen through the ice at Prospect Park 

lake by carrying them to a waiting ambulance. 



HOW LONG CAN THEY GET! Patrolman William Klepper and Inspector Thomas 
V. Boylan examine "the penny in the glass" game that had been cheating Queens 
school kids out of their lunch money. A penny dropped through slit in jar's cover is 
supposed to land in the whiskey glass on bottom. If it does, payoff is five cents. The jar, 
however, is filled with water and the falling penny is deflected in every direction except 
towards whiskey glass. The game was run by storekeepers in the vicinity of schools. 

; ; /'-. M I'ltnio 





The Retired Ring In 




Edward P. Little, of the 105th Pre- 
cinct, who retired in 1948 because of 
injuries sustained as a result of a 
gunshot wound, recently rescued a 
custodian from the burning basement 
of a school in Queens. Despite his 
injuries which still handicap him, Ed 
painfully scaled a seven-foot fence and 
broke into the locked building to reach 
the man whose clothing was afire. Ed 
Little was shot and wounded critically 
in 1934 while breaking up a fight on 
Rockaway Boulevard. Complications 
from the wound forced his retirement. 
. . . John Shilling, retired detective 
of the 101st Squad, has been employed 
by a movie company as technical 
advisor on a film dealing with life in 
a police station. Raves of the critics on 
the authenticity of the settings testify 
to the good work done by John. . . . 
When the class of October 25, 1915 
got together to celebrate its 36th Anni- 
versary, the following retired men were 
present : Inspector Walter T. Hoiiri- 
gan, 7th Division ; Sergeant James 
W. Dunn, Traffic Precinct O ; Detec- 
tives Frank Gilfillan, Brooklyn West 
Headquarters ; John F. Nulty, Central 
Office ; Cesare Bonanno, 16th Detec- 
tive District; Max Leef, 1st Detective 
District ; Irving Higgins, Central 
Office ; and Patrolmen Charles 
Blaich, 18th Precinct ; Thomas 
Flaherty, 25th Precinct ; and Charles 
G. Schnizler, Motor Transport Main- 
tenance Division. Charles Blaich, 



formerly a member of the Police De- 
partment, is now a lieutenant in the 
Fire Department. . . . Robert Scott, 
of Traffic I, is now working at Jack- 
son Memorial Hospital in Miami as an 
oxygen therapy and orthopedic techni- 
cian. He reports that one of his pa- 
tients was former Lieutenant Henrv 
Moeller of First District Traffic. The 
lieutenant is recuperating from a 
knife wound inflicted by a man whom 
he attempted to disarm. . . . Walter 
Herzer, 68th Precinct, after his re- 
tirement from the department, went 
into the Merchant Marine service in 
which he attained a master's rating. He 
came ashore to become active in union 
activities and is now vice-president of 
an organization composed of masters, 
mates and pilots. Latest achievement 
was being elected to the position of 
commodore of the Rudder Club of 
Brooklyn. . . . After a career in the 
department which -lasted for thirty- 
eight years, Maurice J. Dobson, 
Borough Headquarters Brooklyn, has 
joined a Brooklyn utility company as 
assistant director of public relations 
with part of his new duties being co- 
ordinator of the company's Civil De- 
fense program with public authorities. 
While in the department. Dobson was 
bodyguard to Governor Alfred E. 
Smith and later to Governor Herbert 
H. Lehman. . . . Victor E. BalluflF, 
Mounted Squadron No. 2. who spent 
twenty-two years in the Mounted Di- 



vision, is still riding a horse but is now 
in the employ of the ASPCA. As a 
special agent for the association, Bal- 
lufif patrols a seashore bridle path that 
runs through Bergen Beach and Ca- 
narsie. . . . Two former detectives and 
a patrolman are now employed as 
checkers for a steamship line in Brook- 
lyn. Edward Devine, 19th Detective 
District, Bill Ford, 17th Detective 
District, and John McGuire, 75th 
Precinct, are the three former gen- 
darmes who are keeping a sharp eye 
on the waterfront . . . Michael Curry's 
involuntary departure from the 40th 
Precinct because of the new 63-year 
retirement law was brightened when 
school kids on his post in the Bronx 
showed their appreciation of his serv- 
ices by presenting him with a music- 
box. Curry hopes to make Florida his 
home. . . . Michael McDermotl, for- 
mer deputy chief inspector, died on 
January 3 after suffering a coronary^ 
occlusion. Following his retirement in 
1944, McDermott was in charge of 
security police at Oak Ridge, Tennes- 
see and then became coordinator of 
New Jersey's wholesale liquor indus- 
try. . . . Between radio and television 
shows, retired Detective George L. 
O'Connor, Missing Persons Bureau, 
keeps pretty busy. Right now, he's 
working on a book to be called "Mr. 
Detective" and expects to go to Holly- 
wood as a technical advisor on pictures 
dealing with juvenile delinquency. . . . 

Daily XezL's Photos 




EDWARD MAGNESON, formerly 

of the 13th Precinct, is shown 

tpking it easy at a trailer camp 

in Miami, Florida. 



MIKE CURRY, of the 40th Precinct, gets a parting 

gift from school children who appreciated the 

care that he gave them when he patrolled his 

post in the Bronx. 



VICTOR E. BALLUFF, formerly of 

Mtd. Sqdrn. 2, is back in the 

saddle patrolling Canarsie's 

seashore for the A.S.P.C.A. 



— 17- 



tnm Th* 

Legal 
Bureau: 




LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

Grand Larceny — Criminal Receiving — 
Confidential Communications 



Till'", case of People v. Daghlta. 
(Iccidi-d July 11, 1930 in tlu- Cnurt 
of Appeals and reported in 301 N. Y. 
12i. presents several legal aspects of 
interest to police officers : 

1. A series of petit larcenies, may, de- 
pending upon the circumstances, 
amount to a grond larceny, either 
first or second degree. 

2. A thief cannot be convicted of be- 
ing the "receiver" of the selfsame 
property he has stolen. He may be 
Indicted on both counts but the jury 
must determine whether he is guilty 
of a larceny or of criminally re- 
ceiving. 

3. A confidential communication be- 
tween husband and wife includes 
acts as well as statements. 

In this case, Daghita, over a periotl 
of several months, in a series of sepa- 
rate larcenies, stole from an upstate 
department store some 144 household 
items whose aggregate value was over 
$500. He was charged in the one in- 
dictment with the separate crimes of 
grand larceny in the first degree and 
of concealing and withholding stolen 
property. Although the accumulated 
value of the separate larcenies was over 
$500, none of the separate larcenies 
involved property of that amount. 

Series of Acts — Single Larceny 

The law is now settled that where 
property is stolen from the same owner 
and from the same place in a series of 
acts, those acts constitute a single 
larceny regardless of the time elapsing 
between them, provided that the suc- 
cessive takings be pursuant to a single 
intent and design and in execution of 
a common fraudulent scheme. This lat- 
ter ])rinciple was laid down for the 
first time in Nevv York State in 1941. 
in the case of People v. Cox reported 
in 286 N. Y. 1.37, where the defendant, 
a subway turnstile maintainer cm- 
ployed by the Independent Subway 
System, stole nickel fares deposited by 
passengers in the station turn.stilcs. In- 
dividual takings generally were five to 
six hundred fares amounting to but 
twenty-five to thirty dollars. However, 



the total stolen was in excess of $500 
and the Court of Appeals, having been 
satisfied that this matter was properlv 
left by the trial court for a properlv 
instructed jury to decide, affirmed the 
conviction. 

In the Cox case, the court charged 
the jury that the defendant could In- 
found guilty of grand larceny if it 
found that the defendant's takings 
were motivated by "a single and sus- 
tained criminal impulse and in execu- 
tion of a general fraudulent scheme." 
However, if several takings are pur- 
suant to several dift'erent intents and 
each illegal plan is a new and separate 
enterprise, each taking may only be 
prosecuted as a single larceny. Carry- 
ing this reasoning over to the Daghita 
case, he was properly con\icted of 
grand larceny in the first degree. 

Concealing and Withholding 
Stolen Property 

The indictment of Daehita also 
charged him with concealing and with- 
holding stolen property. The Court 
of Appeals decision is interesting in 
that it finally clarifies a situation here- 
tofore largely ambiguous, namely, 
when does the thief's act of withhold- 
ing stolen property change from "lar- 
ceny" uniler Section 1290 of the Penal 
Law to "receiving" under Section l.^OS 
of the Penal Law? The Court of A])- 
peals, by Mr. Justice I'uld, tersely an- 
swered "never." 

Section 1290, Penal L.iw is aimed at 
those who steal and .Section 130S, 
I'enal Law, at those who deal with 
thieves in any one of several ditTerent 
ways after the larceny has been com- 
mitter!, i.e., the traditional "receiver." 
The legislature in enacting these two 
sections designed them to describe or 
refer to different classes of criminals. 
Had it intended otherwise, it could 
very easily have said so. Thus, instead 
of "a person who" which opens -Sec- 
tion 1308 of the Penal Law, it could 
easily have written "a thief or aii\' 
l^erson who." 

Inirther, by the very wording of 
Section 1290, Penal Law which de- 



fines larceny, a per.son is guilty of lar- 
ceny who "wrongfully takes, obtains 
or zvithholds" property from the pos- 
session of the owner. This establishes 
that the act of concealing or with- 
holding is but a continuation of the 
l.irceny itself. Every theft, every 
wrongful misappropriati(jn, of neces- 
sity, contemplates and involves a 
permanent withholding from the 
owner. To conceal and withhold is the 
thief's purpose from the very moment 
that he gains possession of the prop- 
erty. The Court of Appeals reversed 
the conviction for criminally conceal- 
ing and withholding stfilen property. 

C'onfidential Conimunicationg 
— Hiishand and Wife 

Because Daghita's wife, despite ob- 
jection, was permitted to testify during 
the first trial that she saw her husband 
in the act of bringing home merchan- 
dise stolen from the department store 
on various f)Ccasions and of secreting 
some of it in various places in the 
home, this was ruled to be error (299 
X^. Y. 194) and the case was sent back 
for a new trial. Section 2445 of the 
Penal Law reads : 

"Husband or W'lh' as Witness. 
The husband or wife of a person 
indicted or accused of a crime is in 
all cases a competent witness, on the 
examination or trial of such person, 
hut neither husband nor wife can be 
compelled to disclose a confidential 
communication made bv one to the 
other during their marriage." 
In sending the case back for retrial 
the court said in 299 A^ Y. 194 at pages 
198 and 199, ". . . the term communica- 
tion means more than mere oral com- 
munications or conversations between 
husband and wife. It includes knowl- 
edge derived from the obser\ance of 
disclosixe acts done in the presence or 
\ itw of one spouse by the other be- 
cause of the confidence existing be- 
tween ihem by reason of the marital 
relation anil which would not have been 
])erfornied except for the confidence 
so existing. An act may communicate 
knowledge to the known observer and 
repose a confidence in him as clearly 
and unmistakably as if accom]xniying 
descriptive words were uttered. Cer- 
tainly, the wife's knowledge gainetl by 
observance of defendant's conduct in 
bringing home stolen propertv in the 
r;irly morning h(jurs and storing it in 
different jjarts of the house and more 
particularly under his bed was the 
result of a confidential communication 
iin his part. It cannot be sujjposed that 
the defenil.int woukl ha\e so conducted 
himself except in reliance upon the free 



— 18- 



and unrestrained privacy of the marital relation and the 
socially desirable confidence which exists, and should exist, 
between husband and wife." 

Police officers would do well to remember this particular 
point. Some communications between husband and wife 
are confidential not only insofar as oral exchange of infor- 
mation is concerned but also with respect to acts disclosed 
during their marriage as well. Thus, in interrogating wit- 
nesses and in the marshalling of evidence, care should be 
exercised that what is being elicited is admissible in court. 
If inadmissible, other avenues of investigation should be 
explored for the purpose of securing other admissible 
evidence. 



This material was prepared by Detective 
Gabriel Mosner of the Legal Bureau. 



AWARDS 

fContinuec/ from page 8) 



Harold J. Derp— 74th Pet. 
.\hraliam I. Katz — 9th Pet. 

DETECTIVES 

Lawrence C. Diggs — 28th Sqd. 
Coleridge H. Holder— 28th Sqd. 
John B. Carroll— 110th Sqd. 
Andrew D. Hagan — 110th Sqd. 
Dominick Nicastri — 28 Sqd. (2) 
Joseph J. Hennessej- — Man. E. 

Horn. Sqd. 
Thomas J. Lane — 28th Sqd. 
Edward F. Martin — 7th Sqd. 
Michael J. MeArdle— 7th Sqd. 
Tames T. Miirtha — 61st Sqd. 
Walter D. Murray— 68th Sqd. 
Leif R. Reinertsen— 68th Sqd. 
Adolph J. Brickley— 68th Sqd. 
John D. Tassie — i6th Sqd. 
Joseph P. McNally— Pol. Lab. 
Michael J. Peitler— 112th Sqd. 
Leo A. Strofe — 112th Sqd. 
Fohn A. Cavanagh — 112th Sqd. 
"Martin W. J. Potter— 28th Sqd. 
Haston F. Boulware — 28th Sqd. 

PATROLIMEN 

Francis J. McVeigh — Traf. A. 
George Milbournne — 109th Pet. 
Donald S. Collins— 10th Pet. 
Thomas T. Donohue— 10th Pet. 
Frank B. Spataro— 67th Pet. 
Charles H. Coates— 28th Pet. 
Vincent T. Novello — 10th Div. 
[oseph P. Woods— 79th Pet. 
"William E. Jareina— 28 Pel. (2) 
Joseph V. Parisi — Mcv. 1 
Joel S. Weinberg— 20th Pet. 
Sam Smolensk-^- — 12nd Pet. 
George T, Cox, Jr. — 42nd Pet. 
Thomas E. Smith — 13th Pet. 
Dominick Barbarino — 61st Pet. 
laines W. Brown — 32nd Pet. 
"Charles S. Chisholm— 28th Pet. 



Peter Pawl.yk— 112th Pet. 
James J. Rodgers — 112th Pel. 
Alexander H. McDonald — 

42nd Pet. 
Ralph F. Williams-^2nd Pet. 
Edward T. O'Comior — 15th Pet. 
Warren t. Hanlev— 15th Pel. 
Edward R. Shemet— 102nd Pel. 
John M. J. J.aeobi— 14th Pet. 
Arthur G. Keys — 14th Pet. 
Frank Tavlor — 42nd Pet. 
.Albert V. Nethersole — 42nd Pet. 
George Menegus — 7Sth Pet. 
Richard Aidala— 7Slh Pet. 
Henry T. Leitch— Mid. Sqd. 2 
Harold F. Russell— 34th Pet. 
Frederick T. Jaworski — 34 Pel. 
Tames V. Mu"rph\— 84th Pet. 
"Harold E. Surbrug— 84th Pet. 
Roger Levy— 74th Pet. 
Thotnas P. Byrnes — 74th Pet. 
Thomas K. Hickson — Har. Pel. 
Joseph J. Radford — Har. Pet. 
Harry M. H. Hendelman 

— 8'lst Pet. 
Max Sohmer — 81 si Pet. 
Sol Robbins— 69lh Pel. 
Richard J. Canter— 81st Pet. 
Martin J. Dyer— 81st Pet. 
Henry W. I3alheimer— 15 Pet. 
Frank E. Eyans— 79th Pel. 
Milton Meyer — 18th Pet. 
Irving Begner — 48lh Pel. 
William I. Hynes — 42nd Pet. 
William P. McManus— 42 Pel. 
David T. Bowen— 20th Pet. 
Michael J. Campbell— 20th Pet. 
.•\lfred Mandelbaum — 67th Pet. 
Donald J. Kelly— 67th Pel. 
Edward T. Kiernan, Jr. — 

llOUi Pet 
Peter 1. Burke— 110th Pet. 
Raymond I. Mahan— KMlh Pet. 
William J. Mulligan— 104 Pet. 
\"incent Saecd— 10th Pel. 



your Blood is Needed Now! 

The Red Cross Blood Program in this city depends 
entirely upon the voluntary contributions of Nev/ Yorkers, 
both in and out of the department. Blood cannot be 
mined or manufactured; there is no source but human 
donors. Against the day when you or yours may need 
one pint or a dozen. . . . 

Roll up your sleeve at the donor center, now! 

Make an appointment, today, through your command- 
ing officer or supervisory head of your unit. 



Stou^^in^ ih the i.ibfat^ 

by REBECCA B. RANKIN, UbraTian 

- Miiniz-ip/il Reference I ihrnry 



New York State Association of Chiefs of Police held its 
51st Annual Conference in New York City on July 24-26, 
1951. The Proceedings thereof have just been published 
and may be read in the Municipal Reference Library. 



A photograph of "Police — City of New York" heli- 
copters (three of them in flight) is featured on the cover 
of The A\merican City for January 1952. An article on page 
123 describes the performance of the Police Aviation 
Bureau. 



An important report on "Narcotics" has been just pub- 
lished by Nathaniel L. Goldstein, Attorney-General of New 
York State (Legislative Document 1952 no. 27). The entire 
problem has been squarely faced and a real "search for a 
lasting solution to the problem of narcotic addiction" is be- 
ing made. A plan of action is recommended together with 
proposed legislation. 



An excellent book entitled "Police Organisation and 
Management" by Y. A. Leonard (Brooklyn, New York: 
The Foundation Press, Inc., 1951. 507 p. 352.35 L55 pm) 
has just been added to the library's police collection. The 
book is another addition to the well known and widely used 
Police Science Series, a series of books with which every 
police officer should be familiar. The publication of this 
book is very timely, since it will prove of extreme value to 
all patrolmen who are studying for the forthcoming police 
sergeant's examination. 

The author's fourteen years experience with American 
police services makes him an authority on the subject and 
thus gives his book a high ranking position as a reference 
to police organization and management. Although the work 
is primarily designed for police administrators and police 
personnel, it should prove of interest to workers in such 
fields as public administration, criminology, sociology, pen- 
ology, and other related areas. 

The text comprises ten chapters, each chapter covering 
an important segment of police organization and manage- 
ment, plus appendices, a bibliography, an iiulex to authors, 
and a subject index. A chapter entitled "Patrol — Major 
Component Of Line Power,'' will be of special interest to 
the New York City Police Department, since many of the 
points covered in this chapter are directly related to prob- 
lems of this department. One of these problems is the re- 
duction of the operating-time interval, which is, the interval 
between the commission of a crime and the appearance of 
(itficers at the scene. This is one of the major communica- 
tion problems confronting many police organizations today. 
This reduction of operating-time interval is only one of the 
many communication improvements made by the New York 
City Police Department in recent years. It is a problem 
which demands constant scrutiny on the part of police 
organizations. 



— 19- 



THE RECO 



PtI. CARMELLO 



THE other day 1 happened to be 
in the record room of the 97th 
Precinct sjetting a transcript of 
ail arrest. Wliile 1 was complctinij the 
research, my eyes momentarily went 
rovini; around the walls which were 
neatl\- shelved and burdened with po- 
lice records and forms of every de- 
scription, it then occurred to me that 
after we cops put in our twenty years 
on the force, and when all is said and 
done, our "blood, sweat, and tears" 
merely resolve into mute entries on de- 
partmental records. As T was thus 
l)hilosophizinfi, and unless I had sud- 
denly gone psycho, I could almost 
swear that 1 heard the foUowinn; : — 

U.F.61, SERIAL. No. 711 : "I can't 
understand why the 124 man nearly 
beat me to death on the typewriter. 
( )ne would think that / committed the 
robbery. What if it zvas the third time 
within a month that the same 'bird' 
held up a jewelry store at gun-point? 
Didn't he realize that the cops were 
bound to catch up with him sooner or 
later? The punk not only had knocked 
over another jewelry store, but in the 
hari,'ain, he shot the employee who was 
showing him a trayful of gents' rings. 
They described the mug as being white, 
about 28 years, and wearing a blue 
coat and grey fedora. The detectives 
located a witness who saw the thief 




making his escape in a black sedan 
with registration DM-188 N.Y. What- 
ever in the world would the depart- 
ment do without my new streamline 
form, anyway . . . and in triplicate, 
yet!" 

. ALARM No. 19452 : "Say there, let 
up, will you ? What's making you 
swell your head and start sounding off ? 
\'ou're not the only one here, you 
know. Sure you've got an important 
job to do, but don't forget, vou're on 
a TEAM. Now take me, for instance. 
Tn a shorter time than it's taking me 
to tell you, I notified every precinct in 
the city to arrest your culprit. Not 
only had I described the felon and his 
escape-car, but the cops were also told 
that he was armed and dangerous. 
How far would this department get. 
Mister 61, without m}' competent and 
thorough service, eh wise guy?" 

U.F. 16— MEMO BOOK: "I may 
be only a blank pad now, but I know 
what I'm talking about. O.K., so you 
two started the ball rolling. But don't 
forget, without my entry of alarms, 
the cops wouldn't have known what to 
look for. But why are we pinning 
medals on ourselves? The patrolman 
who nabbed the thief deserves all the 
credit. With the sergeants' exam com- 
ing up soon, those extra points for 
good police work can spell a big differ- 
ence on his position on the 
list." 

TELEPHONE REC- 
ORD : "Pardon my intru- 
sion, gentlemen. But may I, 
for a moment, inject a bit 
of dignity and decorum into 



this discursive conversation on the 
merits of your respective functions to 
remind you of the part played in that 
case b\- an average citizen? Gentle- 
men, 1 offer the following recorded 
telephonic conversation for your 
w(jrthy consideration. It's verbatim : 
'A cop asked me to call you for as- 
sistance. He's entering a jewelry store 
across the street from this signal box, 
No. 97-13. A black sedan just drove 
off and the cop said he thinks it is 
wanted on an alarm.' End of com- 
munication, gentlemen. You may re- 
sume your discourse." 

U.F. 6— AIDED No. 1122: "Will 
you pipe that guy ! Maybe we should 
address you as 'Your Lordship.' I 
tlon't see a B.A. or Ph.D. degree added 
to your name. And if it were, in your 
case the B.A. would mean 'Baloney 
Artist' and the Ph.D. would mean 
'Piled Higher and Deeper.' I don't 
say much, fellow's, but when I do, it's 
all facts, P-U-R-E facts. If you re- 
member, that young squirt who had 
been robbing the jewelry stores finally 
ended up a D.O.A. The guy was one 
Hans Marchak who lived in Yonkers, 
N. Y. He was only 25 years old at the 
time he departed from this earth, 
capably assisted, of course, by Patrol- 
man Malone who had shot and killed 
him while the squirt was in the act of 
sticking up the store. Malone's shot 
caught him in the back of the head, 
but not before Malone himself w-as hit. 
Hey Brother, I mean Aided No. 1121, 
tell everyone about what happened to 
Malone." 

THE BLOTTER: "He's not here. 
Your brother was 'duces tecum-ed' on 
the nineteenth of the month by the 
Corporation Counsel. I have it straight 
from the lieutenant's pen, though. 




Ai, 




DS SPEAK 



77th Precinct 



that Malone's gun and the D.O.A.'s 
were sent to Ballistics. Both guns were 
.38s and both were fully loaded with 
but one shot discharged from each. 
Pretty fair shooting I would say, two 
shots and two hits. But the cop was 
still alive, and ipso facto, he was the 
better marksman. Incidentally, the car 
was photographed. It developed that 
the plates were stolen from one car 
and placed on another which had also 
been stolen. I'm not finished yet, Surg. 
1, but anyway, what's on your mind.''" 

SURG. 1 : "What I want to know 
is, why is it that when a cop reports 
sick after being injured in the line of 
duty, the desk officer still must report 
on my face whether or not the officer 
has any complaints pending? Does the 
'Brass' think that a cop gets himself 
shot or injured just to avoid going 
downtown for trial? Well, anyway, 
Malone reported sick at 5 :20 P.M. 
that day due to the gunshot wound in 
his chest. The Reserve Surgeon was 
on his way to the hospital in no time. 
O.K., O.K., Telephone Record, I mean, 
'Your Lordship,' I apologize to the 
Blotter for interrupting him." 

THE BLOTTER: "Apology ac- 
cepted. But I have to leave you boys 
now, the 124 man is taking me out to 
number me. So long. I'll see you 
again, soon." 

U.F. 49: "So long, Blotter. Yes, 
Malone was pretty badly hurt. Three 
days after he sustained his injury, he 
was still in no condition to prepare 
and forward his own request for full 
pay as per the Rules and Regulations. 



The clerical man worked on me for 
some time, sprucing me up for the 
captain to approve and sign. The skip- 
per is an all right guy. He visited 
Malone several times at the hospital 
and he even visited Malone's family. 
He certainly takes a keen interest in 
the welfare of his men. Boy, oh boy, 
could I tell you some stories about one 
or two of our former skippers." 

S.O. 942: "Skip it, bud, not now. 
Sure, the clerical man did a swell job 
on you. But you wound up with so 
many endorsements on your back that 
you looked like the lower half of the 
Declaration of Independence. But 
thanks to me, a supplementary check 
was sent out by the Chief Clerk's Of- 
fice to Malone. By the way, U.F. 49, 
what held up the request for Depart- 
mental Recognition ?" 

G.O. 135 : "Look alive there, S.O. 
942. You know that the request has 
to be investigated by the division com- 
mander and by the Honor Committee, 
not to mention that I had to be printed 
too. It all takes time. And for your 
information, not only did the Police 
Commissioner award him Departmen- 
tal Recognition, but he also gave him 
the Combat Cross. Boy, there's a cop 
who earned it the hard way !" 

NEWSPAPER: "Say, is this 
a private discussion, or can any- 
one join in ? Thanks fellows. 
It's no fun playing the role of a 
Dust Protector for a bunch of 
old Telephone Switchboard Rec- 
ords." 

TELEPHONE SWITCH- 
BOAR RECORD: "All I can 
say is that Ptl. Malone always 
rang in on time." 



NEWSPAPER: "You fellows com- 
pletely forgot about your Article 29 
of the Manual of Procedure, you 
know, 'Public Relations.' Where would 
you be without me? And how about 
the human interest side of the case 
under discussion ? Did you know that 
Malone's family had chided him just 
before he left for duty on that event- 
ful afternoon about how he could 
never be lucky enough to run into 
something big? He ran into it all right, 
but BIG.' The $100 that I gave to his 
wife, Edna, was used to buy Christmas 
clothes for their two sons, Billy and 
Bobby. As for the inside story of the 
shooting, . . ." 

U.F. 61, SERIAL No. 711: "Here 
it comes, boys. Bet you 2 to 1 he doesn't 
give an accurate account." 
■ THE BLOTTER: "Aw, lay ofif, 
U.F. 61. Now that I'm back again, I 
can pick up from where I left off. 
Check me. Newspaper, if I'm wrong. 
Well — Malone ordered the would-be 
stick-up man to 'freeze,' but instead, 
the gunman whirled and fired a shot 
at the officer. Malone fell, critically 
wounded, but as the thug passed by 
him in an attempt to escape, he dis- 
charged an instinctive shot at his assail- 

(Confinued on page 39) 




"cnur 




^"^ 






t^f>t4fH the /the 



News About Police Department Organizations 



PBA Presents 15 Point Program 



Tin; Patrolmen's Benevolent Asso- 
ciation has drawn up a program 
uliicli it expects to discuss with the 
Mayor. The benefits requested are 
listed as follows : 

1. Salary Increase — a thirty per cent 
raise, $800 immediately. 

2. Hours — a five-day week. 

3. Vacations — Twenty-four working 
days. 

4. Uniforms — payment by the city. 

5. Uniform allowance — allotment 
for replacement of worn uniforms. 

6. Associated Hospital Service, Blue 
Cross — Full payment of premiums by 
the city. 

7. Personnel — 25,000 quota and 
maintenance of quota in all ranks. 

8. Return of two-man radio cars. 

9. Elimination of ten year limitation 
on additional pension increment. 



10. Full pension for widows and 
orphans of men killed in line of <luty. 

11. Minimum of $1,200 pension for 
widows and orphans of policemen. 

12. Overtime oiif within thirty days 
of its performance. 

13. Two year statute of limitations 
for disciplinary charges. 

14. Income tax exemption on pen- 
sions. 

15. Annual $100 increments after 
twenty years of service. 

THE POLICEWOMEN'S ENDOWMENT 
ASSOCIATION has reviewed its achieve- 
ments during the past year and finds 
that it has made great strides in secur- 
ing additional benefits for police- 
women. Among the gains the associa- 
tion is proud of are : 

A twenty-five per cent increase in 



quota — from 190 to 240 policewomen. 

Assignment of policewomen to divi- 
sicjii offices on a permament basis. 
.Selections made on seniority records. 

An increase in the budgetary allow- 
ance for women detectives, permitting 
the promotions of twenty-eight women 
assigned to the Detective Division. 

Transfer to the Juvenile Aid Bu- 
reau of twenty-four policewomen who 
had been assigned there for long pe- 
riods but were carried on the roster 
of the Bureau of Policew'omen. 

A five-day chart for policewomen 
assigned to matron duty. 

Representation of the association on 
the Charity and Uniform Committees. 

Inclusion of association members in 
privileges of the specialist medical 
service, sponsored and supported by 
the PBA. 



THE HOLY NAME SOCIETY i Manhattan, 
Hrunx and Richmond) will hold its 
34th Annual Communion Mass and 



POLICE COMMISSIONER GEORGE P. MONAGHAN and Sec- 
retary of the Department Frank D. Doyle flank President Theresa 
Scagnelli at the installation dinner of the Policewomen's Endow- 
ment Association. The Commissioner acted as installing officer. 



THE SHOMRIM SOCIETY'S new board of officers is snapped at the instal- 
lation. Seated, left to right: S. Rocker, G. Bopp, Chaplain Frank, I. Jano 
owitz, L. Weiser and S. Pierson. Standing left to right: S. Blau, J. Isaacson, D 
Burd, J. J. Levit, H. Schreiber, J. Fink, E. Zwerling, D. Winthrop and R. Reyer 




— 22 — 



Breakfast on March 30. Mass will be 
celebrated at 8 :00 A.M. at St. Patrick's 
Cathedral to be followed by breakfast 
at the Hotel Astor. All members are 
urged to make every effort to attend 
and to contact their delegates for 
tickets. 



THE TRAFFIC SQUAD BENEVOLENT AS- 
SOCIATION installed the following to 
serve during 1952 : 

William F. Burke Pres. 

Luther Whittaker.lst Vice-Pres. 

Thomas Joyce 2nd Vice-Pres. 

William Herbert Rec. Secty. 

John Hodgins Fin. Secty. 

Francis Melody Treasurer 

Owen Stephens Sgt.-at-Arms 

Edward Mullare...Chrm. Trustees 

Third Deputy Police Commissioner 
Aaron Frank served as installing officer 
at the dinner held on January 31. 



THE ANCHOR CLUB announces that a 
I'^irst I'Viday Mass and Communion 
will be held on Friday, March 7 at the 
St. Francis of Assisi Church on West 
31st Street. Mass will be celebrated 
at 9:00 A.M. 



THE POLICE SQUARE CLUB will honor 
the Rev. G. Caleb Moor at the March 
1 1 meeting at Masonic Temple by pre- 



senting him with a fifty -year pin mark- 
ing his term of membership in the 
Masonic Order. 

THE GREATER NEW YORK POST, VFW 

will hold its regular meeting at Sokol 
Hall on March 3. Nomination and 
election of officers will be held. All 
members are urged to attend and vote. 
The installation of officers will take 
place at Iceland Restaurant on Sun- 
day, April 27 at 5 P.M. Admission is 
free to members 
are $5.00. 



Tickets for guests 



THE GUARDIAN ASSOCIATION installed 
its new board of officers at a dinner 
held at the Hotel Theresa on January 
12. Seventh Deputy Police Commis- 
sioner William Rowe was the install- 
ing officer. The following will serve 
the association during 1952 : 

Alfred Harper President 

Forrest Donaphin 1st Vice-Pres. 

Charles Robinson 2nd Vice-Pres. 

Russell Miles Corr. Secy. 

William Owens Fin. Secty. 

James Morrow Treasurer 

James Harding Sgt.-at-Arms 

Lieutenants Carl Jordan, Robert 
Mangum and James Austin were con- 
gratulated on their recent promotions 
to that rank. James Austin came in 
for special kudos for being the young- 
est lieutenant in the history of the de- 



partment. Lieutenant Austin achieved 
the rank at the age of twenty-eight. 
During the month of March, the asso- 
ciation will hold study classes at the 
club room each Monday. 

THE HONOR LEGION swore in eighty- 
eight new members at its February 
meeting. This is the largest contingent 
to join the legion at one time. The 
legion is now making plans for the 
re-dedication of the Metropolitan 
Cemetery together with renaming it 
the "Police Arlington." Date of re- 
dedication will be announced when final 
plans are formulated. 



FREE LEGAL SERVICE 

Free legal service to PBA mem- 
bers will now be provided by the 
Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, 
John E. Carton, president, an- 
nounced. Cases must be referred 
to the PBA by delegates and, where 
the circumstances warrant, the case 
will be assigned to the lawyer. 

The firm of Tully, Wood, Molloy 
and France, 25 Broad Street, N. Y., 
will represent the PBA, through 
James H. Tully who has represented 
the PBA for twenty-four years in 
organizational and disciplinary 
matters. 



THE OFFICERS AND GUESTS OF THE CIVILIAN COUNCIL pose for 

their picture at their installation dinner held on January 24 at the 

Henry Hudson Hotel. A large audience was present. 



DEPUTY POLICE COMMISSIONER WILLIAM ROWE administers the 

oath of office to the Guardians Association's new board of officers at 

the installation dinner held recently of the Hotel Theresa. 




P.D 



RETIRED 



P.D 





The following retirement appli 


:ations 


were approved by the 


Edward J. Quinn 


Sept 


22, 


1905 


C.O.D.D. 


Board of Trustees of 


the Pension Fur 


d at its meeting of 


Frederick W. Schall 


July 


28, 


1910 


Traf. D 


January 21. 










Hugo R. M. Schuster 


Dec. 


6, 


1913 


Traf. O 






Date 




Edward Stauffer 


Mar. 


25, 


1912 


105th Pet. 


Name 


Appointed 


Command 


Michael F. Sullivan 


Feb. 


10, 


1913 


Traf. C 


ASSISTANT CHIEF INSPECTOR 


Bernard H. Walsh 


Aug. 


24, 


1915 


63rd Pet. 












James M. Culley 


Oct. 


29, 


1908 


M.T.S. 


John F. O'Leary 


Feb. 


5 


1912 


Traf. Div. 


James F. Donnelly 


Sept 


29, 


1909 


M.T.M.D. 












Henry Flattery 


Oct. 


25, 


1915 


D.D. Boro. Hq. Q. 




CAPTAINS 




John P. Hess 


Sept 


11, 


1911 


Hq. Div. 












John E. Mesle 


Jan. 


30, 


1907 


Hq. Div. 


Michael Brown 


Dec. 


26 


1917 


Traf. H 


William H. Meyn 


July 


2, 


1908 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


George O. Burpeau 


Mar. 


25 


1912 


Boro. Hq. Qns. 


William G. Murray 


Mar. 


25, 


1912 


Quartermaster Off. 


Edward J. Conroy 


July 


3 


, 1913 


109th Pet. 


James C. Pritehard 


Apri 


1, 


1907 


16th D.D. 


Martin J. Corley 


June 


18 


1912 


Traf. E 


Harry Schreiber 


Mar. 


20, 


1906 


O.C.I. 


Charles Humbeutel 


Apri 


1 


1907 


52nd Pet. 


Stephen Connolly 


Feb. 


26, 


1919 


Traf. R 


Thomas J. Lenihan 


Feb. 


10 


1913 


26th Pet. 


John Grimes 


Dee. 


14, 


1913 


Traf. B 


John J. McAvoy 


Aug. 


4 


1916 


Traf. J 


Barney J. Martin 


Jan. 


21, 


1927 


88th Pet. 


Andrew J. Sarosy 


June 


30 


1909 


Off. 4th D.P.C. 












Charles F. Sellman 


Dec. 


10 


1913 


Traf. P 












Martin Sheehy 


Sept 


15 


1905 


Boro. Hq. Qns. 




SERGEANTS 




John Zipp 


June 


17 


1912 


111th Pet. 


Joseph C. Ahern 


Sept 


29, 


1905 


2nd Dist. Traf. 


John J. Travers 


Jan. 


2 


1930 


O.C.I. 


Hans Amundsen 


Sept. 


12, 


1911 


E.S.S. 5 












Arthur J. Butler 


Nov. 


16, 


1916 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 




LIEUTENANTS 




John J. Corbett 
Edward J. Donohue 


Dec. 
Dee. 


3, 

5, 


1912 
1911 


18th D.D. 
15th Pet. 


Carl A. Anderson 


Nov. 


22 


1911 


P.A. 


Patrick H. English 


April 24, 


1912 


M.T.M.D. 


John S. Armstrong 


Sept. 


13 


1906 


26th Pet. 


Peter J. Finnegan 


Nov. 


20, 


1907 


22nd Pet. 


Thomas J. Armstrong 


Sept. 


15 


1905 


Traf. O 


Charles S. P. Gaul 


June 


11, 


1912 


Traf. N 


Charles R. Beach 


Dec. 


5 


1911 


16th Pet. 


Michael Gavigan 


July 


29, 


1909 


106th Pet. 


William Beck 


Aug. 


2 


1906 


19th Pet. 


William R. Gerlang 


June 


3, 


1908 


64th Pet. 


John O. Becker 


Aug. 


7 


1912 


4th Dist. Traf. 


George F. Hagerty 


Dee. 


5, 


1905 


8th Pet. 


William P. Bennett 


Oct. 


9, 


1911 


Boro. Hq. Man. E. 


Albert W. Harriott 


Dec. 


3, 


1912 


26th Pet. 


Michael F. Bownes 


Jan. 


24, 


1912 


74th Pet. 


James M. Hughes 


Oct. 


2, 


1913 


Traf. K 


Oliver J. Brigley 


Aug. 


24 


1915 


48th Pet. 


Henry F. Huners 


Jan. 


24, 


1912 


77th Pet. 


Michael Carey 


May 


4, 


1916 


76th Pet. 


William D. Kenealy 


Dec. 


30, 


1902 


Traf. C 


Patrick Clarke 


Dec. 


5, 


1911 


92nd Pet. 


Matthias Logan 


April 12, 


1917 


Traf. G 


Michael Connolly 


April 26 


1913 


10th Pet. 


James Mannion 


June 


11, 


1912 


22nd Pet. 


Thomas F. Delaney 


Aug. 


24, 


1915 


52nd Pet. 


Henry C. May 


Sept. 


25, 


1905 


85th Pet. 


Thomas J. Egan 


May 


6, 


1911 


Traf. G 


Walter P. Mitchell 


Aug. 


25, 


1913 


71st Pet. 


Emmet B. Forrie 


May 


4, 


1908 


85th Pet. 


James M. Moron 


Feb. 


1, 


1907 


Traf. D 


Thomas J. Gillen 


Nov. 


8, 


1909 


C.O.D.D. 


John F. Murphy 


May 


17, 


1902 


66th Pet. 


William J. Greeley 


Jan. 


27, 


1916 


Traf. P 


James E. O'Brien 


Aug. 


25, 


1913 


Hq. Div. 


John J. Hogan 


Mar. 


2, 


1907 


4th D.D. 


Michael O'Brien 


June 


28, 


1911 


19th Pet. 


Michael Hurley 


Dec. 


6, 


1913 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


James J. O'Connell 


Nov. 


5, 


1910 


105th Pet. 


John J. Hutton 


April 


1, 


1907 


Har. Pet. 


Thomas B. Randall 


Mar. 


15, 


1913 


O.C.I. 


Peter Keone, Jr. 


Nov. 


20, 


1913 


Traf. A 


John J. Regan 


July 


2, 


1908 


104th Pet. 


Hartford D. Keith 


May 


24, 


1910 


Hq. Div. 


John Salmon 


Nov. 


20, 


1913 


Traf. P 


William F. Lovett 


Oct. 


2, 


1905 


D.D. Boro. Hq. Q. 


John White 


Feb. 


28, 


1907 


71st Pet. 


Myles A. Lynch 


June 


13, 


1917 


Off. 4th D.P.C. 


Bernard M. Boylan 


Dec. 


5, 


1905 


C.O.D.D. 


Henry J. McCormack 


Sept. 


24, 


1910 


66th Pet. 


Julius P. Brilla, Jr. 


Feb. 


10, 


1913 


C.O.D.D. 


Harry J. McCrossen 


Oct. 


28, 


1912 


67th Pet. 


Grover C. Brown 


Sept. 


15, 


1905 


C.O.D.D. 


Hugh J. McGarvey 


June 


5, 


1913 


D.D.Boro.Hq.Man.W. 


Arthur C. Fleischer 


Dec. 


30, 


1910 


13th D.D. 


Patrick McGuire 


Mar. 


15, 


1913 


Traf. 1 


Charles W. Flood 


Jan. 


31, 


1903 


7lh D.D. 


John McHugh 


Aug. 


25, 


1913 


11th Pet. 


Vincent A. Hastings 


Nov. 


8, 


1911 


12th D.D. 


Thomas McManus 


Feb. 


2, 


1907 


Traf. O 


Jerome Murphy 


Aug. 


1, 


1908 


C.O.D.D. 


John J. McMonigle 


June 


18, 


1912 


Equip. Bur. 


John F. Shevlin 


July 


2, 


1908 


1st D.D. 


Thomas Maher 


Aug. 


15, 


1917 


1st Dist. Traf. 


Byran Munsell 


Aug. 


25, 


1924 


13th Pet. 


Michael J. Monnion 


May 


29, 


1911 


Traf. K 


David R. Wallace 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


83rd Pet. 


Joseph Meade 


Feb. 


10, 


1913 


Traf. A 


John J. Kelly 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


lOlsf Pet. 


William Mulry 


June 


28, 


1917 


Traf. A 


James S. Kelly 


Jan. 


10, 


1927 


110th Pet. 


Daniel O'Connor 


Aug. 


24, 


1915 


Bridge Dist. 


Charles J. Mohler 


Jan. 


n. 


1927 


106th Pet. 


Jeremiah F. O'Shea 


Nov. 


20, 


1913 


Comm. Bur. Qns. 


Walter F. Phelan 


Apr. 


6, 


1931 


Traf. D 


Gustave J. Papp 


May 


4, 


1908 


90th Pet. 


Martin Connolly 


Feb. 


27, 


1912 


6th Pet. 



— 24 — 



P.D 



RETIRED 



P.D 





PATROLMEN 






William H. Miller 


Jan. 


21 


1927 




61st Pet. 


ClifFord Haese 


June 


2 


1926 




E.S.S. 13 


Marcus Jacobs 


Dec. 


1 


1931 




Traf. H 


Henry Fleuchaus 


Jan. 


3 


1924 




E.S.S. 19 


Patrick H. McNamara 


Feb. 


20 


1928 




Traf. H 


Edward F. Cahill 


Jan. 


18 


1927 




14th Pet. 


William J. Jones 


Oct. 


30 


1926 




28th Pet. 


Harry M. Conyers 


June 


2, 


1926 




E.S.S. 12 


Kasmier Dilgen 


Feb. 


15 


1927 




67th Pet. 


Joseph P. O'Hara 


Sept. 


4 


1913 


Ch. 


Eng. Off. 


Leo W. Maurer 


April 


6 


1931 




E.S.S. 9 


Charles J. Cooper 


Jan. 


12 


1927 




E.S.S. 6 


Thomas A. Gashun 


April 


5 


1923 




13th Pet. 


John F. X. Reid 


Dec. 


8 


1930 




66th Pet. 


William J. Walsh 


Aug. 


13 


1919 




M.T.M.D. 


Benjamin Davis 


Dec. 


1 


1931 




26th Pet. 


Harold M. Connolly 


Dec. 


1 


1931 




79th Pet. 


Henry Adler 


June 


4 


1915 




7th Pet. 


Robert H. Ahles 


July 


8 


1912 




Traf. N 


Bernard J. Bajart 


Aug. 


28 


1913 




19th Pet. 


Adolph W. Beerman 


Aug. 


1, 


1908 




C.B. Qns. 


Frederick Behrens 


Sept. 


24 


1910 




Traf. D 


Michael F. Beirne 


May 


3 


1917 


Off. 


4th D.P.C. 


Joseph H. Boyle 


July 


27 


1911 


Boro. Hq 


Bklyn. E. 


Donald McK. Bruce 


Sept. 


16 


1913 




60th Pet. 


Edward J. Buckley 


Sept. 


22 


1905 




100th Pet. 


Herman C. Buser 


June 


30 


1909 




114th Pet. 


James J. Byrne 


Sept. 


24 


1905 


Mtd 


. Sqdn. 2 


Joseph P. Calcaterra 


June 


11 


1912 




78th Pet. 


Leo O. Carey 


Nov. 


21 


1918 




14th Pet. 


Joseph J. Carroll 


Dec. 


4 


1911 


C.B. Bklyn. 


John Connelly 


July 


27 


1910 




C.O.D.D. 


Charles H. J. Connor 


Mar. 


2 


1907 


Pr 


Clk. Off. 


Patrick A. Corcoran 


Nov. 


16 


1916 




Traf. D 


Peter J. Coyle 


Dec. 


21 


1908 




C.O.D.D. 


Daniel Curry 


Nov. 


20 


1913 




Traf. E 


Michael Curry 


Nov. 


20 


1913 




40th Pet. 


Patrick Cushen 


Dec. 


1 


1913 




Traf. L 


John A. Daly 


Mar. 


20 


1906 




4th Pet. 


John H. Dawson 


June 


11 


1912 




O.C.I. 


Walter Delahunty 


Jan. 


27 


1916 




Traf. K 


Charles E. Delancy 


Oct. 


31 


1913 


Boro. Hq. 


Bklyn. W. 


David S. Dick 


June 


10 


1911 




19th Pet. 


David L. Downing 


Feb. 


10 


1913 




72nd Pet. 


John F. Duffy 


Aug. 


9 


1915 




10th Pet. 


Harold H. Eller 


Oct. 


9 


1911 


Boro 


Hq. Bnx. 


Ernest T. Enck 


July 


29 


1909 


Ch 


Clk. Off. 


Michael Enright 


May 


14 


1909 




Traf. B 


Henry J. Feis 


May 


6 


1913 




75th Pet. 


Joseph P. Fitzpatrick 


Jan. 


14 


1920 




14th Pet. 


Richard E. Fitzpatrick 


Aug. 


4 


, 1916 




68th Pet. 


John J. Flood 


Dec. 


31 


, 1907 




88th Pet. 


James P. Flynn 


Oct. 


2 


, 1905 


Boro 


Hq. Qns. 


Patrick J. Flynn 


June 


10 


, 1911 




C.O.D.D. 


Cornelius Foley 


Feb. 


10 


1913 




34th Pet. 


William Fox 


Dec. 


19 


, 1907 


Boro 


Hq. Qns. 


Louis S. Futter 


April 


15 


, 1912 




7th Pet. 


James J. Geraty 


Nov. 


20 


, 1913 




Hq. Div. 


Frederick C. Gerhardt, Jr 


. Sept 


29 


, 1908 




C.O.D.D. 


Michael J. Gleason 


Mar. 


31 


, 1914 




18th Pet. 


James F. Haggerty 


Apr! 


14 


, 1905 


Ch 


Clk. Off. 


John Hartmann 


Sept 


27 


, 1910 




109th Pet. 

(Continued 



Frank I. Hefferan 
Herbert H. Hollweg 
James F. Hughes 
Sidney E. Hutehins 
Thomas Kane 
Samuel Kaplan 
William P. S. Kelly 
Michael J. Kennedy 
Charles A. Kernner 
Thomas J. Lawlor 
Raymond Leida 
John Livingston 
John C. Logan 
Jacob M. Long 
Joseph G. Loughran 
Thomas P. McCue 
Patrick McCulgan 
Howard P. McDonagh 
William M. McDonald 
Joseph McFarlond 
Joseph L. McGinnis 
Martin McGowon 
Joseph F. McKay 
James C. Mangan 
Louis Melloh 
George W. Moron 
Salvatore Morano 
Andrew Murphy 
Francis M. Nolan 
John J. Noonon 
Robert C. Nugent 
Charles H.Nussboum, Jr. 
Patrick J. O'Brien 
Thomas J. O'Brien 
Thomas O'Loughlin 
William M. Potter 
Gustave E. Reich 
John D. Reilly 
Michael Reilly 
Ferdinand J. Ross 
Charles H. Roth 
Robert F. Roy 
John Ruoff 
William Ruoff 
Joseph J. Ryan 
Moses Sehleier 
Charles C. Schrimpf 
Martin Sheehy 
John L. Shanley 
William A. Sorenson 
Stephen J. Strenek 
August Suhr 
Frederick H. Symington 
Frederick Tietjen 
Joseph P. Toomey 
Edward B. Turner 
Rudolph H. Voelker 
John R. Walsh 
Joseph P. Walsh 
John L. Weis 
John Welsch 
Joseph S. White 
WalterJ.T. Williams, Sr. 
Frederick A. Wilson 

on next page) 



Sept. 


24, 


1902 


July 


29, 


1909 


Feb. 


27, 


1912 


May 


17, 


1902 


Jan. 


24, 


1912 


May 


10, 


1904 


Dec. 


26, 


1905 


Aug. 


1, 


1908 


Aug. 


4, 


1916 


Sept. 


24, 


1910 


Aug. 


9, 


1915 


June 


4, 


1915 


July 


27, 


1911 


Sept. 


29, 


1905 


Aug. 


27, 


1913 


Sept. 


24, 


1910 


July 


25, 


1917 


Aug. 


7, 


1912 


Sept. 


27, 


1905 


June 


15, 


1909 


May 


17, 


1902 


Sept. 


25, 


1912 


May 


6, 


1913 


Oct. 


10, 


1911 


April 


1, 


1907 


May 


15, 


1912 


Nov. 


16, 


1916 


May 


3, 


1917 


Mar. 


25, 


1912 


Aug. 


15, 


1917 


Feb. 


2, 


1907 


Aug. 


28, 


1913 


Jan. 


27, 


1916 


Mar. 


2, 


1908 


Feb. 


28, 


1907 


Nov. 


20, 


1907 


Nov. 


20, 


1907 


Mar. 


12, 


1910 


Sept. 


24, 


1910 


Oct. 


8, 


1912 


May 


29, 


1911 


Feb. 


28, 


1907 


Nov. 


16, 


1916 


Aug. 


25, 


1913 


April 17, 


1913 


May 


3, 


1917 


Aug. 


25, 


1913 


Dee. 


13, 


1913 


Dee. 


19, 


1907 


June 


29, 


1906 


July 


2, 


1908 


June 


18, 


1912 


Mar. 


2, 


1907 


June 


3, 


1908 


June 


5, 


1913 


Nov. 


20, 


1906 


Feb. 


1, 


1910 


June 


30, 


1909 


June 


11, 


1912 


Dec. 


27, 


1911 


June 


6, 


1912 


Sept. 


18, 


1907 


July 


29, 


1904 


June 


11, 


1912 



O.C.I. 

42nd Pet. 

Traf. B 

Traf. C 

100th Pet. 

80th Pet. 

Boro. Hq. Man. E. 

120th Pet. 

Boro. Hq. Qns. 

C.B. Man. 

30th Pet. 

C.O.D.D. 

82nd Pet. 

62nd Pet. 

20th Pet. 

103rd Pet. 

M.T.M.D. 

Boro. Hq. Man. E. 

88th Pet. 

C.O.D.D. 

16fh Pet. 

15th Pet. 

110th Pet. 

4th Pet. 

C.B. Man. 

22nd Pet. 

Boro. Hq. Man. W 

52nd Pet. 

64th Pet. 

Traf. D 

60th Pet. 

42nd Pet. 

Off. 4th D.P.C. 

7th Pet. 

74th Pet. 

8th Pet. 

C.O.D.D. 

Mtd. Sqdn. 1 

81st Pet. 

1st Pet. 

19th Pet. 

Boro. Hq. Man. E. 

18th Pet. 

68th Pet. 

61st Pet. 

8th Pet. 

78th Pet. 

9th Pet. 

Traf. B 

120th Pet. 

103rd Pet. 

Off. 4th D.P.C. 

M.T.M.D. 

Hq. Div. 

M.T.M.D. 

Mtd. Dist. 

82nd Pet. 

32nd Pet. 

Traf. P 

43rd Pet. 

5th Pet. 

79th Pet. 

D.D.Boro.Hq.Bklyn.W. 

110th Pet. 



P.D 



RETIRED 



P.D 



PATROLMEN -fCon»inued; 



Emil J. Winkel 


Nov. 


5, 


1910 


92nd Pet. 


Eugene J. Rosenberg 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


48th Pet. 


Joseph B. Yost 


Feb. 


27, 


1912 


84th Pet. 


Victor P. lannelli 


July 


1, 


1931 


60th Pet. 


William H. Young 


Nov. 


21, 


1918 


75th Pet. 


Harry G. Folk 


April 11, 


1930 


62nd Pet. 


Theodore C. Youngman 


Aug. 


13, 


1919 


40th Pet. 


Walter Jacobson 


Mar. 


26, 


1924 


63rd Pet. 


James F. Brady 


June 


30, 


1909 


34th Pet. 


James R. Carpenter 


June 


16, 


1926 


66th Pet. 


Daniel C. Devoti 


Jan. 


3, 


1907 


2nd D.D. 


George E. White 


Oct. 


14, 


1930 


72nd Pet. 


John J. A. Dunn 


Oct. 


18, 


1917 


C.O.D.D. 


Denis F. Gallagher 


April 


6, 


1931 


101st Pet. 


John R. Finnen 


Dec. 


5, 


1911 


D.D.Boro.Hq.Man.W. 


George W. Dehler 


Jon. 


1, 


1931 


102nd Pet. 


William M. Haley 


Feb. 


28, 


1907 


C.O.D.D. 


Albert Cowdell 


Oct. 


14, 


1930 


103rd Pet. 


James J. S. McGee 


June 


3, 


1908 


C.O.D.D. 


John H. Peterson 


Nov. 


22, 


1926 


106th Pet. 


Robert F. O'Brien 


June 


3, 


1908 


C.O.D.D. 


Gerald N. Kinsello 


Dee. 


1, 


1931 


106th Pet. 


Harry Roedel 


Oct. 


29, 


1908 


7th D.D. 


Louis Bobel 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


110th Pet. 


Lewis R. Stokes 


June 


3, 


1908 


BIdg. & Rep. Bur. 


Anthony J. Quagliano 


Jan. 


5, 


1921 


123rd Pet. 


Andrew J. Tully 


Aug. 


1, 


1908 


D.D.Boro.Hq.Bnx. 


James F. Power 


June 


24, 


1930 


CD. 


Francis A. Travis 


Feb. 


20, 


1913 


C.O.D.D. 


William W. Christenser 


June 


25, 


1931 


M.T.S. 


Henry Wittel 


Dec. 


22, 


1909 


23rd D.D. 


Joseph B. Fish 


June 


25, 


1931 


E.S.S. 17 


Andrew A. Hoffman 


Feb. 


23, 


1917 


Off. 4th D.P.C. 


Leo O'Connell 


Feb. 


21, 


1928 


Mtd. Sqdn. 2 


Frederick J. Nickel 


Aug. 


13, 


1919 


1st Pet. 


Umberto V. Minervini 


Mar. 


6, 


1925 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


Eugenio Turro 


Jan. 


27, 


1916 


7th Pet. 


Francis J. King 


July 


1, 


1931 


25th Pet. 


John J. Regan 


Nov. 


22, 


1918 


22nd Pet. 


Walter J. Law 


Sept. 


4, 


1928 


46th Pet. 


James J. McCann 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


20th Pet. 


Frank Young 


Nov. 


22, 


1926 


25th Pet. 


William P. O'Loane 


June 


2, 


1926 


C.B. Man. 


John E. Meenan 


June 


2, 


1926 


10th D.D. 


Salvatore G. Cossidente 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


4th Pet. 


John McKenna 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


Traf. D 


Joseph W. Pointer 


April 


7, 


1931 


70th Pet. 


Herman J. Mark 


June 


24, 


1930 


105th Pet. 


John P. A. G. Wilzman 


Jan. 


20, 


1927 


83rd Pet. 


Edgar Liddy 


Oct. 


14, 


1930 


63rd Pet. 


Alfred M. Lahiff 


June 


30, 


1921 


71st Pet. 


Thomas P. Rohan 


Jan. 


18, 


1927 


72nd Pet. 


Ernest E. Albrecht 


Dec. 


19, 


1923 


13th Pet. 


Theodore Sherry 


Jan. 


8, 


1931 


75th Pet. 


Anthony Dellomo 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


67th Pet. 


George F. Nelson 


Jan. 


31, 


1930 


C.O.D.D. 


William A. Walsh 


Aug. 


18, 


1926 


72nd Pet. 


Michael Struber 


June 


21, 


1926 


Traf. K 


Maurice D. Lynch 


Jan. 


20, 


1927 


80th Pet. 


William P. O'Grady 


Nov. 


1, 


1926 


77th Pet. 


John J. McCardell 


April 


7, 


1931 


Har. Pet. 


Ralph J. Albano 


Jan. 


31, 


1930 


E.S.S. 13 


Gerard P. Grady 


July 


3, 


1928 


21st D.D. 


Thomas P. Arnold 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


32nd Pet. 


David L. Taylor 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


G.C.P. Pet. 


Charles J. Kelly 


Sept. 


25 


1930 


Traf. E 


Francis J. Schroder 


Aug. 


24, 


1915 


32nd Pet. 


John T. Kunz 


Jan. 


2 


1930 


Mtd. Sqdn. 2 


Louis M. LeFever 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


G.C.P. Pet. 


James F. J. Harkins 


Dec. 


30, 


1921 


C.R.D. 


Raymond H. Gallagher 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


10th Pet. 


Eugene T. Hynes 


Mar. 


26, 


1924 


C.R.D. 


Robert E. Sweeney 


Sept. 


25, 


1930 


28th Pet. 


Edward A. Muller 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


15th D.D. 


John V. Lynch 


June 


17, 


1926 


Off. 4th D.P.C. 


Francis J. O'Brien 


Feb. 


17, 


1908 


Off. 4th D.P.C. 


Alfred J. Chandler 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


P.A. 


Harry P. Shelley 


Mar. 


2 


1907 


17th Pet. 


John H. Judycki 


Oct. 


19, 


1925 


24th Pet. 


Joseph J. Becker 


May 


6 


1911 


73rd Pet. 


Artilio S. Schemoni 


Sept 


7, 


1928 


24th Pet. 


August P. Kunath 


April 


30 


1907 


73rd Pet. 


James J. Bianco 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


94th Pet. 


Walter Jacobson 


Mar. 


26 


1924 


63rd Pet. 


Stephen N. Joehl, Jr. 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


105th Pet. 


John Rasch 


June 


11 


1912 


94th Pet. 


Bernard Dolan 


Apri 


18, 


1918 


43rd Pet. 


George H. Klinger 


Aug. 


28 


1913 


G.C.P. Pet. 


John J. M. Healy 


Jan. 


26, 


1927 


Har. Pet. 












Charles F. Pivrnec 


July 


3, 


1928 


E.S.S. 16 












Herman J. Bartsch 


Oct. 


1, 


1931 


44th Pet. 




POLICEW 


OMEN 




Peter T. Mattes 


Oct. 


1, 


1931 


83rd Pet. 












James F. Holden 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


109th Pet. 


Helena C. Brady 


Aug. 


27 


1923 


J.A.B. 


norland B. Calkin 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


41st Pet. 


Elizabeth V. Burke 


Dec. 


30 


1925 


J.A.B. 


Patrick D. Murphy 


Nov. 


22, 


1926 


Traf. E 


Bertha M. Conwell 


Mar. 


23 


1918 


J.A.B. 


Francis J. Lutz 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


19th D.D. 


Margaret Evans 


Mar. 


25 


1918 


Bur. Polw. 


William Thorn 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


41st Pet. 


Emma M. Gross 


Aug. 


8 


, 1922 


Bur. Polw. 


Alexander K. Clerk 


Oct. 


19, 


1925 


C.O.D.D. 


Lillian Harrison 


Aug 


27 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 


Farncis T. Flynn 


Dec. 


3, 


1928 


C.O.D.D. 


Kathoryn L. B. Kalish 


Aug 


27 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 


Morris Sandberg 


Dec. 


1, 


1931 


7th D.D. 


Anna P. E. Kauff 


Dee. 


30 


, 1925 


Bur. Polw. 


William J. Descovich 


Dec. 


5 


1931 


22nd Pet. 


Mamie McAllister 


Aug 


27 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 


Edwin F. White 


Jan. 


17 


1923 


23rd Pet. 


Barbara C. Popken 


Aug 


27 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 


Filomeo C. Saviola 


June 


25 


1931 


24fh Pet. 


Katherine V. Relyea 


Aug 


27 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 


William J. Ryan 


June 


16 


1926 


28th Pet. 


Delia Schaible 


Apri 


1 


, 1929 


Bur. Polw. 


John H. Parsons 


Dec. 


1 


1931 


41st Pet. 


Mary Sullivan 


Mar. 


6 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 


Harry L. Wood 


Dec. 


1 


1931 


46th Pet. 


Mary E. F. Sullivan 


Aug 


27 


, 1923 


Bur. Polw. 



— 26- 



STUDY 



POLICE ACADEMY 




HALL 



MARCH, 1952 



QUESTION NO. 1 

Select the correct statement : A missing person is one 
who (A) is wanted for commission of a crime (B) is 
reported missing (C) is wanted on a warrant (D) is 
seventeen years old, reported missing after having been 
jilted. 

QUESTION NO. 2 

Answer True or False : An eighteen-year-old boy who 
voluntarily leaves home because of domestic reasons will 
be considered a missing person. 

QUESTION NO. 3 

To what type of case will the term "unidentified dead" 
be applied? 

QUESTION NO. 4 

Select the incorrect statement : An unidentified person 
is one who is subject of any aided case where (A) the 
person is unable to identify himself (B) the identification 
cannot be determined at once (C) the relatives or friends 
cannot be immediately located (D) he refuses to identify 
himself or state his place of residence and is eighteen 
years old. 

QUESTION NO. 5 

Where will the Commanding Officer, Missing Persons 
Bureau cause all detained males, ages sixteen and seventeen 
from other cities, to be sheltered when they have been re- 
ported as missing, pending the arrival of their parents? 

QUESTION NO. 6 

A patrolman attached to the 4th Precinct, makes a report 
to his commanding officer regarding persons whom he sus- 
pects are violating the narcotic laws. No immediate action 
is necessary. State action of the commanding officer. 

QUESTION NO. 7 

What department unit will maintain a complete Laundry 
and Drv Cleaning Mark file? 

QUESTION NO. 8 

Generally, in every case in which a firearm, air rifile 
or air pistol equipped with a rifled bore barrel comes into 



possession of a member of the force, such firearm will be 
delivered to the Ballistics Squad. Who will obtain said 
firearm after the Ballistics Squad has examined the weapon? 

QUESTION NO. 9 

State action of a desk officer of precinct of occurrence 
when he receives a report from a force member who has 
discharged his revolver in the performance of police duty. 

QUESTION NO. 10 

Select the correct choice : The will be prepared 

for each pistol or revolver owned or used by a member 
of the force and special patrolmen. (A) U.F. 65 (B) U.F. 
65A (C) U.F. 6SB (D) U.F. 65C. 

QUESTION NO. 11 

Where will the master file of the D.D. 52a (Resident 
Known Criminal Card) be filed? 

QUESTION NO. 12 

Who shall have access to the criminal or other records 
of the Detective Division? 

QUESTION NO. 13 

What department bureau will maintain a "Detective's 
Visit Book" for the purpose of recording visits made by 
complainants and witnesses in company of a detective to 
view the bust, profile and standup pictures in the Modus 
Operandi File. Detectives accompanying such persons will 
sign the book and enter results obtained by such. 

QUESTION NO. 14 

To what department bureau would you direct a person 
who desired to obtain Good Conduct Certificates? 



QUESTION NO. 15 

What department unit 
of Case Forms ? 

QUESTION NO. 16 



maintain a file of Historv 



The Bureau of Criminal Identification maintains a non- 
criminal "Civilian Identification File" which contains vol- 
untarilv submitted civilian fingerprints. The use of said 
file will be restricted. For what purpose may the file be 
used ' 



The questions and answers in this section were prepared by Lieutenant Sanford D. Garelik, Police Academy. 

This material is restricted and cannot be used in other publications without the permission of the Editor. 



27 



ANSWERS 



ANSWER NO. 1 

D. (_Aiuli: Article 12, Paragraph 26) 

ANSWER NO. 2 

False. (Aiitli: Article 12, Paragraph 26) 

1. Must be under 18; 

2. Or 18 and over, and mentally or physically affected 
so that hospitalization may be required; 

3. Or possible victim of drowning or indicated intention 
to suicide; 

4. Or possible involuntary disappearance. 

ANSWER NO. 3 

Dead human bodies whore (a) true identity is unknown, 
or (b) relatives or friends cannot be located immediately. 
(Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 28) 

ANSWER NO. 4 

D. (Auth: Article 12. Paragraph 29) 

ANSWER NO. 5 

7th Precinct Station House. (Auth : Article 12, Para- 
graph 37) 

ANSWER NO. 6 

Forwards information on U.F. 49 to the Chief of Detec- 
tives. (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 39) 

ANSWER NO. 7 

Police Laboratory. (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 45) 

ANSWER NO. 8 

Officer delivering same. (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 
5i ) 

ANSWER NO. 9 

1) Entry in Blotter. 2) Notify borough communications 
bureau for transmittal to the Ballistics Squad. 3) Upon 
notification from the Commanding Officer, Ballistics Sciuad 
of appointment date when officer shall appear at squad for 
test and examination of revolver, make Telephone Record 
entrv and cause notification to officer concerned to be made. 
(Auth : .Article 12, Paragraph 51A) 

ANSWER NO. 10 

U.F. 65A (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 56, Subdivision 
b) 

ANSWER NO. 11 

Bureau of Criminal Identification. (Auth: Article 12, 
Paragraph 75) 

ANSWER NO. 12 

1) No one except a member of the department assigned 
to the Detective Division unless authorized by the Police 
Commissioner, Chief Inspector, or the Chief of Detectives. 



(Auth: Rule 167) 

2) Relative to D.D. 52a (Resident Known Criminal 
Card) only members of the department at the precinct; 
complainants accompanied by detectives at the Bureau of 
Criminal Identification. (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 76) 

3) Relative to parolee and released criminal file, depart- 
ment members, parole officers and officials, and officials 
of the State or City Department of Correction. (Auth: 
Article 12, Paragraph 89) 

4) By due process of law. (Auth : Rule 250) 

ANSWER NO. 13 

Bureau of Criminal Identification. (Auth: Article 12, 
Paragraph 62) 

ANSWER NO. 14 

Bureau of Criminal Identification. (Auth : Article 12, 
Paragraph 60) 

ANSWER NO. 15 

Bureau of Criminal Identification. (Auth: Article 12, 
Paragraph 60) 

ANSWER NO. 16 

Identifying 1) amnesia victims, 2) unknown dead per- 
sons. (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 61, Subdivision c) 



PROMOTION COURSE 

Preparaiion for 

Sergeant — Lieutenant — Captain 

Monday 7:30 P.M. 

Tuesday 10:30 A.M. 

Wednesday 5:30 P.M. 

Thursday 11:30 A.M. 

Friday 5:30 P.M. 

(No session on holidays) 

at 

Officers' Training School 

7 Hubert Street, Manhattan 

(Ono-holf block from Hudson Street) 

Transportation 

independent Subway System— Canal Street Station 

i.R.T. System, 7th Ave. Line— Canal or Franklin 
Street Stations 

I.R.T. System, Lexington Ave. Line — Canal and 
Lafayette Station 

B.M.T. System— Canal and Broadway Station 

Topics w\\\ be changed weekly. Each class ses- 
sion will be for a period of two hours. Attendonce 
will be on f/'me off dufy. No fee will be charged. 



— 28 — 



The Old Forty-Niner 

(Continued from page 13) 

1947 r" 

"Dan Murphy? Which one? There must be two dozen 
Dan Murphys in the department." 

"i mean the Dan Murphy who got shot-up in a hold-up. 
He was shot three times but came out of it all right." 

"Oh, that one ! That's the Dan Murphy who chased a 
hold-up man and caught up with him when the guy boarded 
a 42nd Street crosstown bus. Murphy knocked a gun out 
of his hand and started to wrestle him off the bus. Then 
the guy pulled another gun and shot Murphy three times. 
He didn't go down but staggered oft the bus, took aim 
through a window, and shot and killed the hold-up man. 
Yeah, that was quite a story." 

"That's the one," said the Editor. "There's a man who 
owes his life to the blood program. Why don't you take a 
run up and see him. Find out how he's getting along on 
'borrowed time.' " 

"Me and my big mouth," muttered the Old Forty-Niner 
as he reached for his broad-brimmed, fifty-mission fedora, a 
holdover from the time he was in plainclothes. "See you 
later, Boss." 

A little while later. Old Forty-Niner was listening to 
Danny Murphy — Daniel J. Murphy, now second grade 
detective assigned to the 17th Squad, but back in 1947, 
assigned to the Midtown Squad. Soft-spoken Dan had 
started his story by saying, "I was patrolling my post at 
43rd Street and 6th Avenue at about 1 P.M. on July 7, 1947, 
when I observed a man running through traffic." 

"It's funny!" the Old Forty-Niner thought. "Ask a 
cop to tell you about a case he's been on, and he begins to 
talk like a report — an official report." 

The story was familiar to the Old Forty-Niner — but he 
was looking for the story behind the story ; NOT the head- 
line story "Cop Shoots Gun-Man," but the flesh and blood 
story of a brave man facing a crisis. Waiting for his op- 
portunity, he interrupted, almost rudely, "What did you 
think when he shot you ?" Surprisingly, the answer came 
swiftly, as though Murphy had mulled it over many times. 
"I wondered why it didn't hurt and I wondered why I 
didn't fall down. I could see the blood seeping out of my 
side and stomach ; but I didn't know w-hat held me up. 
Like a lot of other guys in the job, the only time I ever 
saw anyone shot was in the movies — and in the movies, 
they fall down." To emphasize the point. Murphy made 
the familiar gesture of clutching his stomach and collapsing 
— -a gesture every moviegoer recognizes as "another gun- 
man bit the dust." 

"What did you think when j'ou shot him ?" the Old Forty- 
Niner asked. 

"I hoped that he would fall down. I prayed that I 
wouldn't miss. He had only been tw^o feet away when 
he shot me — ■ and one bullet had missed me and the other 
three hadn't killed me. All of a sudden, it came dear to me 
that I wasn't in the department shooting range taking my 
time and cocking the hammer. This was for keeps. The 
passengers were flat on the floor so I didn't have to worry 
about them. I was only a few feet away and still I was 
afraid that he w^ouldn't fall down. But he did — with the 
first shot. The bullet spun him around and' he dropped." 

"Naturally I wondered about it until I found out that I 
had been shot with a .32 and that my .38 had been more 
effective. I still carry a .38 although I'm not in uniform. 
After that, I guess I collapsed but I was still conscious. 



1 began to worry about getting to a hospital. 1 had a feel- 
ing that if 1 got to a hospital in a hurry I wouldn't die. 
I knew a call had gone in for an ambulance but I was 
afraid that in the Times Square traffic an ambulance might 
take too long to get to me. Then two things happened that, 
I believe, saved my life. First, Lieutenant Green of Emer- 
gency Service, who was driving by, stopped to investigate. 
He put me in the car and drove me to Roosevelt Hospital. 
I had suggested Roosevelt automatically, although there are 
hospitals much nearer. I guess I said Roosevelt because 
that's where so many of our aided cases are sent." 

"Maybe it was lucky for me I picked Roosevelt. The 
big hospitals like Bellevue, Harlem, and Roosevelt have a ' 
lot of experience in dealing with gun-shot wounds. I never 
saw so many doctors and nurses. They cut my uniform ofT 
with scissors and started blood transfusions in a couple of 
minutes. After that, I don't recall very much for the next 
three days. Then the Mayor came to see me and Commis- 
sioner Wallander made me a detective right there in the 
hospital. The fellows in my command were swell to me 
and my family. I got lots of fan mail and the papers made 
a big thing of it. The Daily News and the Journal-Ameri- 
can gave me their awards for that month. The big one, of 
course, was winning the department's Medal of Honor. 
The only bad time I had was the first time I was able to 
see my wife. She broke down — and I guess I kind of 
broke down, too." 

There was a sudden silence, incongruous with the busy 
office of the 17th Squad room and then Old Forty-Niner 
said, "You said there were two things that saved your life. 
What was the second ?" 

"Blood," replied Dan, "and plenty of it. You know, the 
guys in this job are funny. They gripe and they groan; 
they act — oh — kind of hard-boiled; but when the chips 
are down, they come through. Only last year, I met a fel- 
low in the job who told me a story that didn't get any pub- 
licity and it would be nice if you mentioned it. Just after 
I was shot, he heard that there was a wounded cop in 
Roosevelt who needed blood. He went right over — didn't 
even know me. He said when he got there, the place was 
jammed with cops waiting in line to give blood. There must 
have been a hundred guys waiting. I never even knew about 
it because the hospital drew on the blood bank. I was on 
sick report for nine months — but after that I went over 
to the Red Cross to donate my blood for some other guy 
who might need it." 

"How have you done since then?" asked Old Forty- 
Niner. 

"All right, I guess," said Dan. "First, I was assigned 
to the 80th Squad and while I was there I won a com- 
mendation for apprehending two men wanted for a 
series of armed robberies. Then I was transferred to the 
17th Squad and my partner, Bernard Clark, and I got a 
commendation for our work on the Billy Rose jewel case. 
I guess my luck is kind of holding out." 

"Luck, nothing!" thought Old Forty-Niner. "This guy. 
Murphy, was no flash-in-the-pan but a fine police officer 
doing a consistently good job, no matter where he was 
assigned." 

Old Forty-Niner shied away from thinking about what 
the ending of the stor\- might have been if the blood bank 
had not been available. As if reading his thoughts, Dan 
went on, "I always think that the efforts of all those won- 
derful doctors and nurses would have been wasted if it 
hadn't been for the blood that kept me alive." 

"Excuse me and thanks for the story," said Old Forty- 
Niner, "It's about time that I made my date with the Red 
Cross to donate blood, too." 



29 — 




NG 'SM OVER 



MANHATTAN 

3rd PRECINCT: Important thi\-c.s first: From the view- 
point of tlie cop on the street, most important of all is the coming 
sergeant's exam scheduled for March 29 (as if you didn't know). 
There's just a short while left and the dividends are mighty high. 
So put in some time on the hooks. For those who don't lake our 
advice, we'll have a noose availahle in the sitting room on March 30. 
Let's hope we don't have too many customers. . . . Our apologies 
to Nick Paul. The January issue had him .i,'oing out as a result 
of the 63-year bill. Now we find he has until September 1952. It 
looks now like our own Sergeant "Georgie" Miller is going to 
beat him to the punch. More on this later. . . . The Book-of-the- 
Month Club selections have nothing on our department's SPRING 
3100. Now they go like the proverbial hot cakes. Remember the 
time when you couldn't give them away. Could this be because 
there are so many students and SPRING 3100 has taken over the 
publishing of the amendments to the R. & R. and the Manual? 
Qianges these days come so fast and furious that if you don't keep 
up with them, you are a gone goose. Inclusion of changes is one 
of the best things ever done in the magazine. Congratulations to 
the staff. . . . Person.\l Notes : What new assignment was recently 
taken over by our able cleaner, Otto Schmidt ? Answer ; Washing 
down walls while sitting in a cushioned chair. He is now looking 
for a fleece-lined wash-rag and a slightly used kidney plaster. We 
include some of the choice remarks heard while the washing was 
going on: "What do they want me to do — everything?" "Comes 
the Summer, I'm taking my vacation and then getting out. Then 
they can get someone else to do my dirty work." ... A visit to our 
civil defense office will find you being greeted by Sergeant Dyckes. 
our new precinct coordinator. He took the job over recently from 
Sergeant O'Rourke (now a lieutenant). The sergeant is doing a 
fine job too. As a matter of fact, at a recent air raid drill, things 
got so realistic that someone had to be prevented from pulling a 
fire-box by someone. . . . For future contracts, you can see Ser- 
geant Dyckes or one of his able assistants, Ptl. Jake Dwyer or Gott- 
lock. . . . Had some contacts with recent departures from the fold : 
Lieutenant Sackman and Bill O'Rourke, both now right in stride 
with their new duties. . . . Also Lieutenant Barry and Ptl. Ed 
Straub, both holding down good jobs but missing the old blue. . . . 
Some things you c.\n't rightfully expect : Frank Molloy in a 
one-piece bathing suit. . . . Ted Boland without a summons book. 
. . . Bob Dehmer speaking in a whisper. . . . Eddie Heerorant with 
a smile. . . . Chuckles Kennedy not using the King's English. . . . 
Jerry McMoon without a smile. . . . George Neilson putting his 
1928 Chevrolet up for sale. . . . H. D. Van Cleaf doing setting-up 
exercises. . . . Frank Weidenburner with his hair parted, and last 
but not least. . . . Our Staten Island boys taking their time to catch 
the boat. . . . That's all for now. 



Sill I'RECINCT: Our photography editor was able to get this 
candid shot of ever genial and i)Opular Freddy Cambria one pay- 
day, as Fred smilingly bounded up the steps into the S.H. carrying 



you-know-what 




waiting paymaster to the right is 
Massa Bill Foster. . . . Storm in 
.\ Teacup— We herewith present 
to our membership the breathless 
saga of the garment that is des- 
tined to go down in the lore and 
legend of good old Moicer Street 
:is a fitting rival to King .Arthur's 
I'.xcalihur, Lady Godiva's tresses, 
Icarus' waxen wings, Abraham 
Lincoln's top hat, and Jim McDon- 
nell's shoes — // is your reporter's 
nc'M overcoat. It has created a 
furor, dividing the Number Eight 
into two rival camps, the Pros, led 
by daring Dom Largo, and the 
Cons, under the dynamic leadership 
of Lt. Seubert, with your reporter 
caught helplessly in the middle of 
the seething tempest. . . . Memo to 
the Cominunications and Records 
Division: If you are at a loss for 
good testing signal for suspected- 
ly inoperative signal bo.xes, our 
Ptl. Tom Rancich has devised an infallible testing code, to wit: 
"Hippety-hop, Hippety-hop, Are you there?, Hippety-hop." . . . 
Open letter from Teo Best to George Lippi : WHERE'S THAT 
MUSIC BOX?— end of letter. . . . Congratulations are in order for 
Huey Brockhues on that fine arrest where he relieved a felon of 
a fully loaded .45 calibre revolver and 40 extra cartridges. W'hy 
the green gills, Gerr ? . . . How come George Weber has been cry- 
ing into his corn flakes ever since Jim Koelln joined the happy 
ranks of the second squad? . . . Will Sgt. Gage please tell us what 
a U.F. 13 is? . . . Get the inin^itable Pat Keavey to relate the 
hilarious tale of the most original prisoner he ever encountered. 
Seems the miscreant, being charged with violation of 1897 P.L., 
explained, "Your Honor, the only reason I bought this gun was to 
shoot myself in the stomach to forget my toothache." — Oh, Patrick ! 
. . . Did you know that Frank Novak is the latest addition to Tom 
Dunn's retinue of disciples? . . . One of our regular contributors. 
Red Porco, handed in a choice tidbit for this column. Our only 
regret is that this, being a family magazine, precludes its being 
printed herein. Thanks, nevertheless, for the cooperation, Sal, and 
keep pitchin'. . . . Jerry Cicero is canvassing the older men in the 
command, looking for the gendarme who has an eligible daughter 
to whom one might become affianced. In order to expedite matters. 



CAMBRIA AND FOSTER - 

There are reasons for the 

smiles. 



WHERE ARE YOU? 

Material carried under "Looking 'Em Over" is prepared 
by volunteer reporters in various commands of the depart- 
ment. If your precinct is missing from this issue it is because: 
(1) No one has volunteered as your reporter (2) Your re- 
porter has not sent us any material (3) Your reporter's ma- 
terial reached us after our deadline. Names of our precinct 
reporters are listed inside the front cover except in those 
cases where they have requested that they be allowed to 



remain anonymous. 

We appreciate very much the cooperation of our report- 
ers in the field, but we should like to remind them that we 
must have their copy in our hands by the 5fh of each month 
for inclusion in the next month's issue. We have a printer's 
deadline to meet if we are to publish on time. The coopera- 
tion of all will be much appreciated. And remember, please, 
it should be typed double-space on one side of the paper. 



— 30- 



members who thiiik themselves quahfied may submit applications 
via the SPRING 3100 box. . . . An anonymous request has reached 
our desk, which we pass on to the principals concerned. When 
Paul Ludwig and Henry Kelly meet, zvho salutes whom first? ? ? 
. . . And did you know that Willie O'Rourke always says "hello" 
second? . . . Dan Carnevale, worried about his thimiing locks, in 
deep consultation witlt the Richmond County Pepper Baron for 
his secret formula. . . .Too Much Study Dept. : Which patrol- 
man (named Matt Kurshals) assigned out of command, arrived for 
a day tour at 8:10 A.M. and blushingly explained that there was a 
big subway tieup, only to be informed by his new CO. 'twas O.K., 
for his 48 hour excusal was not up for another 24 hours anyway? 
... I Love to Be a Policeman Dept. : George Parker, when asked 
(at 10:45 P.M.) what tour he was working, replied enthusiastically, 
"An eight to four, sarge." ... An unknown contributor writes that 
B. B. Wilson and Ol' Smokey Wylie are at each other's throats 
once again on the greens of La Tourette. Seems that O.S. wants 
to play under old golf rules, whereas B.B. wants to employ new 
rules of private origin on public courses. . . . Welcome home to 
Burt Alvins, who finds precinct patrol more to his liking than cleri- 
cal duty. . . . We won't be meeting again in print until after THE 
EXAM. Best wishes to all you students (especially Rog Lucchese) 
and may all your future troubles be little supervisory ones. 

11th PRECINCT: Most popular man in the 11th Pet. is Har- 
old Greismer who reports on all matters. . . . George (Beau Brum- 
mel) Orth has his late tour pants up for sale. . . . Who does patrol 
all around the stationhouse on all tours when Joe Pierro is swinging 
his mop? . . . This simimer Steve Doherty and Jack Gaily are 
going to take a bundle of joy up to Joe's summer place in Carmel, 
N. Y. . . . Why is the 11th Pet. called the 11th ward? . . . Since 
Ptl. Huzer lost his wedding ring he was last seen wearing a cigar 
band. . . . Broccali Rondionone and his partner Ed. Burban always 
busy and on the job. . . . Tom Forino is going into the clam busi- 
ness out on Long Island when he gets set. . . . Mersh Rosner, the 
most generous man in the 11th Pet., always donating to some worthy 
charity. ... It is rumored that Ptl. Bildzuikiewicz is going to 
change his name to Smith. . . . Lt. Byrne is still watching the 
orders. . . . Sgt. Mohr always telling the boys to try their doors. . . . 
Sgt. Gillespie, known as the Deacon, has taken retired Sgt. Scan- 
Ion's place. . . . Ptl. Lally, the former bartender, always laughing. 
. . . Our slogan is "Eternal vigilance and constant patrol, by all 
members of the Fighting 11th Ward." 

13th PRECINCT: Congratulations to former Captain O'Neill 
on his recent appointment as deputy inspector. Our loss is the 
department's gain. We wish to extend our best wishes in welcom- 
ing our new skipper. Captain Cohen. In the short time that you 
have been with the 13th, you have merited 100% cooperation from 
your men. . . . More congratulations to Ptl. Pellet on his new addi- 
tion — a package from heaven — Name : Barbara — Sex : Girl — Weight : 
8 lbs. — Eyes : 2 — Hair : hardly any. Mrs. Pellet is doing fine. . . . 
Impertinent Questions : Whose faces were red when the D.O.A. 
under the bus got up and slowly walked away? Is it true that 
Charles Atlas, the noted strength-builder threw in the towel when 
Ptl. Gill applied for the course? Thanks to our unsung heroes, the 
Pet. Attendants, Ptls. Cooke, Peterson, Smith and big boy Simp- 
son for keeping the bums from confusing our Pet. with the Munici- 
pal Lodging House. Nice work men. ... A speedy recovery to 
our ailing Ptls., Joe Filler and Ed Greany. Sincerest sympathy to 
Sgt. Leyden, and Ptl. Peters on the loss of their respective fathers. 
. . . How about building up this column and making it something 
worthwhile. Any gags, puns, marriages, births, interesting pictures, 
etc., will be appreciated. 

15th PRECINCT: Man of the Month— Ptl. Al Brown, Shield 
#214. wlio though bitten on the left forearm, quickly subdued and 
disarmed a man with a loaded gun in a midtown business office. 
The prisoner was booked for felonious assault and violation of the 
Sullivan Law. . . . Welcome — To the new by-liner in SPRING 
3100, who goes by the name of "The Old Foriy-Niner." His stories 
are strictly "big-time" and we hope that he never misses an edition. 
. . . Detective Div. — Edward O'Connor is on a 90-day assignment. 
It couldn't happen to a nicer person. . . . Blessed Events — The 
Bryan Butlers have a lovely bundle of pink at their penthouse, and 



at the Frank McDonald's villa, tlie future Mayor of the Bigtown. 
. . . The stork told us he also has a contract with the John Mc- 
Kennas. . . . Sick Bay — Artie Zalpolski, with appendicitis. . . . 
True STORV^It happened a pay day ago, when a certain patrolman 
going off the 8 to 4 tour, signed for and received his pay-check. 
He stopped at the desk to place his envelope containing the "house 
tax" in the box and then proceeded on his way home to cash the 
check in one of the neighborhood stores. But, lo and behold, upon 
entering the store he found that his check was missing. He quickly 
searched all his pockets and then dashed back to the station house 
to look in his locker for the check but found it bare. His next stop 
was the front desk and with beads of perspiration rolling down his 
face he told a tale of w^oe to the desk officer. However, he reckoned 
without the capable aid of MICKEY, the house cat, for at that pre- 
cise moment Mickey walked across the top of the desk with said 
check in his mouth. His reward w^as a large platter of fish, because 
he had seen his duty and saved the day for a very excited but 
happy cop. Mickey once belonged to one of the richest banking 
families in town but he gave up Park Avenue, because he fell in 
love with Harry Osmond who takes care of him each day of the 
year. . . . Condolences— To Jack Sloan, upon the death of his 
mother. . . . H.\ll of Fame— In G.O. #4, the following named men 
were cited as follows: Commendation— Sgt. James R. Lancaster, 
Ptl. Joseph G. Egan and Ptl. Andrew McLaughlin. . . . Meritorious 
Police Duty— Ptl. Alister Crichton and Ptl. James J. Mullany, Jr. 
. . . Excellent Police Duty— Ptl. Warren Hanley, Ptl. Edward 
O'Connor and Ptl. Henry W. Dalheimer. . . . Happy Birthday— 
To Sgt. John Flumach, Sgt. Eugene Nifenecker, Joe Beck, Tom 
Connolly, Tim Ellsworth, Gene Foley, Bob Giordano, Paul Gross, 
Cornelius Harrington, Jim Mackin. Sylvester McCrudden, lack 
Nashbitz, Bill Sullivan. Byron Schrock, Leslie Schultz, John Shares, 
Joe Sica, and Ed Tonkin. . . . New Arkiv.al— Sgt. Armando Zona! 
... Songs for Sale— You haven't lived until you've heard Bill Sul- 
livan sing an Irish ballad. . . . His shadow, John McCarthy, was 
stationed in Ireland with the U. S. Army back in 1944. Came St 
Patrick's Day, the boys all got set for a big blowout in the town 
of Limavardy, but the .'Vrmy brass restricted them to quarters that 
particular night feeling that the boys might start a donnybrook in 
town. "Mac" is still mad because he feels that he missed the dream 
that every Irishman has in his heart— to be back home on the "Ould 
Sod," dancing a jig to the tune of a fiddler on St. Patrick's Day. . . . 
Mazel Tov— To all the boys who are taking the sergeant's exam- 

(Continued on nex^ poge) 



Posthumous Award for Heroism to Son of 
Captain McVeigh 




FOR HEROISM UNDER FIRE IN KOREA, two of our nation's 
highest decorations— the Silver Star and the Bronze Star Medals 
—awarded posthumously to 2nd Lt. Thomas L. McVeigh, USMC, 
are shown being presented to his parents Captain Thomas J. 
McVeigh, Commanding Officer of the 16th Precinct, and Mrs. 
McVeigh. The presentation was made on January 12 by Colonel 
Miles S. Newton, Commanding Officer of the Marine Barracks, 
Brooklyn Navy Yard. 



31 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-rcon«.nu.dj 



ination. It figures to be tough. So be prepared to stand a shock 
upon opening the paper wlicn tlie bell rings on "D-Day." You will 
feel as though some butterflies are staging a dance in your stom- 
ach. However, relax, because this is just a case of stage fright 
and it happens to the best people. As the test passes through the 
first hour, >ou are bound to see a few fellows throwing in the 
towel, but, we beg of you, stay until the final bell and answer every 
question. When you hand in your paper, go straight home and don't 
stick around, waiting for the "students" or back room lawyers, be- 
cause these boys will drive jou a bit wack-y. Take the beautiful 
wife out to see a show and forget about the test. Before we get 
down off the soapbox, we want to make one suggestion, to wit: 
The best school or private tutor camiot help you unless you've spent 
some hours on the books. Grab the Manual or Civil Defense book- 
lets and read them as you travel to and from the job and, last but 
not least, read the article on Narcotics, which appeared in the 
December issue of SPRING 3100. It is a collector's item. . . . 
Income Tax Time— Sgt. John Fulton and Charlie Collins debating 
the correct way to make out the form. . . . Shangri-L.\ — The best 
news of the year to reach this desk is that former Ptl. Edward 
Keenan, father of our own Artie Keenan, is well on the road to 
recovery after a long illness. He resides in Miami, Florida, with 
his lovely wife and so to Ed and all his pals down in the land of 
the oranges, the best of health, happiness and sunshine for the sake 
of Auld Lang Syne. . . . Odds & Ends — It did our little hearts good 
to see the boys filling in the Questionnaire" as requested by the 
staff of SPRING 3100. We personally believe the magazine is 
slightly terrific and deserves its place in the sun, especially when the 
"Oscars" are awarded each year by the Pulitzer Committee. . . . 
City Desk — If you wonder, how is the best way to contact us with 
news items or pictures, just address an envelope to the "Cub Re- 
porter" and leave it in the rack. No one has correctly guessed w-ho 
is the author of this column and we prefer to remain a reporter 
without a by-line, because it makes for better copy in selecting 
material for publication. . . . Say goodbye for now and hope that 
St. Patrick's Day is fair and sunny for the parade. . . . 

22nd PRECINCT: Beware the Ides of March! ! ! ! What does 
this month bring us ? Toil and trouble . . . income tax ; but to 
offset this we do have St. Patrick's Day which we hope will be a 
gloriously sunny and bright day for the Hibernians. The end of 
winter is at long last here and perhaps one or two days will be raw 
and cold, but we'll appreciate the wonderfully warm and spring- 
like days that will follow. This is the month that we'll really start 
to live again . . . for the beautj- and ever-inspiring miracle of spring 
is once again at hand. Willie Descovich is a civilian via retirement 
and the best wishes of the command go to Willie in his new status. 
A good cop and a conscientious man, he will be remembered as the 
guy who was cited by the department on several occasions for the 
brave and daring lake rescues which he made during his career. 
Good luck, Willie! The best wishes of the men also go to Frank 
Vancura who has doffed the blue of the department for mufti. 
Frank was a bang-up clerical man and will long be remembered 
for the competent manner in which he discharged the exacting duties 
of his office. The best to you, Frank ! And we would like those 
old-timers who retire to drop around on occasion to say hello. We 
want you to know that we're always available if there's anything 
you need or if there's anything tliat we can do for you. Speaking 
of old-timers, Jim Rowland recently passed by and he's sure a 
grand-looking man. Before Jim joined the department, he was a 
cop on the Ould Sod, a distinction that we're quite sure few other 
men can match. Now that Jim's retired he looks younger than 
ever. Sgt. Jim Mannion dropped over to see us the other day and 
we will always call him sergeant in spite of the fact that Jim is 
a civiHan, A wonderful guy, Sgt. Jim has another job and is 
really enjoying himself. (We think that he'd still like to work 
around the clock, though!) A valiant but futile effort was made by 
three of our officers a short while ago to rescue a small boy who 
had gone through the ice at the 100th Street Pool. While assigned 
to RMP, a radio call came through and upon arriving at the scene, 
they were directed to the spot where the boy had gone through 



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and where two civilians were trapped in mud. Ptl. Pete King, Tom 
Doyle and Frank Monohan approached the location from different 
sides, rescued the civilians and then went under the ice and re- 
covered the body of the boy. Artificial respiration was applied but 
to no avail. . . . Ptl. Dan Komhouser observed a man acting in 
what he felt was a peculiar manner, investigated and found a 
veritable arsenal in his possession. Knives, guns and what not ! 
Had a previous, as well. Nice going, Dan! . . . Our boy. Felony 
Joe Naudin, is back and you can rest well assured that crime 
will be on the run in the 22 just so long as he is about. Joe has 
more felonj' arrests to his credit than ainy other man in the pre- 
cinct and we know he'll keep it up — with the able and competent 
assistance of his capable partner, Em Dzurilla. . . . And just for 
the record, it isn't true that only the paid up PBA members get 
write-ups, but pay your dues and we'll see what we can do for 
you. . . . Talked to John Keaney and he related the following: 
While riding on the bus a man kept staring and staring at our hero. 
Finally, the man said, "I'm sorry to keep staring. Officer, but I 
can't help it. You look just like my wife, except for the mustache." 
Keaney looked at the guy and said, "I haven't a mustache. Mister." 
"I know," said he, "but my wife has!" And away he went, with 
his keeper, of course. . . . Lt. Hodge is now a permanent member 
of the P.A. While many of the new members didn't know the 
Lt., may we say, that he is really an inspiration to the younger 
men in the job. Medal winner on divers occasions, he was a Marine 
and that probably is the reason he's such a good cop. Good luck 
in the academy, Lt. ! . . . So Mary said to her friend, "Well, your 
husband's recovery was certainly miraculous. I understand that the 
doctors had given him up and you made him better. What did 
you do?" "Well, I'll tell you, dearie. I sat down and asked myself 
a question and couldn't find an answer so I made him better." 
"What was it you asked yourself?" "All I wanted to k-now was 
who wanted a widow with four children ? Couldn't find any answer." 
. . . Three rags and a tiger to Horace Atkins, Bill Clark, Jack 
DiPrima Mike DeCandia, Harry Kiritz, Dan Komhauser, Mike 
Miano, Willie Monroe, Bill McCormack, George Peterson, Joe 
Pekara and Joe Scialabba who celebrate birthdays tliis month. In- 
cidentally, Atkins is a newcomer to the command and we extend a 
warm greeting. We know you'll enjoy your stay. Everyone does ! 
. . . Our buddy, Irv Abrams, is anxiously anticipating promotion and 
can hardly wait for the day. We hope, Abe for your sake it's soon. 
(We do not want his job!) Frank Haig is remarkable in his ban- 



I 



32 — 



dling of the difficult clerical task. Patient and perserving, Frank has 
picked up the job just like THAT, and we've no doubt that he'll be 
one of the best in the business in a short time. Not only that ; he's 
an Air Raid Warden too I . . . Most frequently made statement heard 
about : "Go ahead, ask me a question !" Mike Lonergan is really 
pushing tlie students and we know that this time Mike will make it. 
Koslvi and DeFranco are two of the older book-worms, and the 
younger guys better watch out for tiiese two potential dark horses. 
. . . The column extends to each and every aspiring "Boss" the best 
of luck in the examination this month and we hope and pray that 
each and every man makes it. Not just makes it but where he'll 
be in a position to be reached. . . . John Sullivan off to Florida for 
his vacation. Enjoy yourself, John! . . . Sgt. Jesse Peterman found 
it necessary to have a tooth extracted recently and it's the first 
tooth that the Sgt. ever lost. In this day of false choppers, that's 
really something. . . . We're listening to the number one oracle of 
the clerical room orate, re; tlie present day political set-up and how 
to correct said condition. Meyer the Buyer, puleeze ! It won't 
work, we know it! . . . Well, just had a good word from Larry 
Stoddard, our civilian attendant, who knows more about the Manual 
and Rules than the cops. We'll bet that Larry wouldn't have any 
trouble passing the next exam. . . . Well, dear readers, this is about 
it, the lunch hour is at hand and we say that one can't live on love 
alone, one must feed the inner man . . . and so to lunch. Remember, 
men. Keep the Faith, and bear in mind always what Greek slaves 
would whisper into the ear of their revelling Roman masters as 
they massaged these masters after a night of pleasure, "Momento 



25Ui PRECINCT: Stork Club — Homeward bound on a recent 
afternoon your reporter encountered one of our precinct clerical 
men just leaving a supermarket accompanied by SOME of his off- 
spring, a boy and two of the cutest little twin girls you ever saw. 
The boy labored under two huge grocery bags as our hero ambled 
contentedly alone, surveying the passing scene. As this was written 
he had just returned to work after a siege of illness purported to 
have been brought on by penicillin poisoning, but which we suspect 
may have been induced by some of the tast}', but over-ripe meatballs 
that our upstairs cleaner brings in the guise of food. Bill's wife 
(we are speaking of Hartnett), has again presented him with a 
daughter, making the score one boy and four girls. Here is a lad 
with a lot of time left in this job who had better study for promo- 
tion ! Anyhow, congratulations to him and to Bob Monahan who 
is right behind him with four boys by virtue of the recent arrival of 
another deduction from his 1951 income tax return. And we 
wouldn't want to overlook our amiable friend Masterson, whom we 
hear (from an unimpeachable source, namely "Whispering" Stahl) 
is considering naming his first born son "Julius." JULIUS???????? 
Wait until his boss hears that ! Mike Miller says that whoever tied 
those knots must have used slip-knots (Joke). 

News Briefs — Our very best wishes for success upon his return 
to the carefree life of a civilian go to one of our elder statesmen, 
Frank Young, who at long last has put in his papers and is reported 
to be managing the estate for that widow over on Madison Avenue. 
. . . This month we welcome to the 25th Precinct Sergeants Croake, 
Sherman, and Kent. We know you'll like it here and trust that your 
stay will be mutually happy. . . . John Kenney, only a short while 
ago burned out of his apartment by a five alarm fire, is now laid up 
in his new place after an operation for appendictics. Get well soon, 
John, and back to the job because Mahoney needs you ! . . . Our 
sincere condolences to Walter Silk, whose mother passed away 
soon after the start of the new year. . . . We are pleased to be able 
to report that Joe McCabe, formerly of this command, is now doing 
very well as a driver for the Surface Transportation. . . . Speaking 
of former members of this command, we were happj- to hear from 
Don Mallon, who transferred some time ago to the wide open spaces 
of the Jamaica precinct. Somehow w^e suspect that despite the bucolic 
pleasures of the country, time occasionally hangs heavj' on his hands 
and he misses the nightly rodeo on 125th Street, as we miss those 
excruciating puns he used to perpetrate upon the unwary. 

Order of the Purple Neck— Did you ever stop to think how- 
dull life would become without the happy little practical jokers who 
often go to great lengths to irk and vex some poor unfortunate 
victim, especially when they suspect that their efforts will be re- 



warded by a violent explosion of temper ? Two outstanding examples 
of this peculiar psychology were lately demonstrated when some im- 
known person or persons pinned a large comic button over the 
shield on a coat hanging on the coat rack, while the owner was busy 
elsewhere prior to donning it for the morning roll-call. Only when 
the sergeant, in the mistaken belief that it was some new type of 
commendation, walked over to inspect it did the wearer become 
aware that all was not well, and promptly delighted the jokester with 
a highly satisfactory burst of indignation. And then several days 
later, another comic mounted on tlie wall a somewhat defunct pig's 
head decorated by a uniform cap and a corn cob pipe, which we 
somewhat reluctantly grant did resemble the gendarme named on 
the accompanying placard, and who also gratified his tormentors by 
immediately blowing a fuse. . . . I. O. U.'s. . . . We w^ant Bill 
Pawelko and several other lads, who expressed the desire to see 
their names in print in this column, to know that we are not neglect- 
ing or forgetting them but just saving up until we get a really worth 
while item. So get busy. 

Added Starters For Our News Briefs— Earl Jones can be justly 
proud of his two successive arrests of armed and dangerous thugs. 
Nice work ! . . . . Congratulations and best wishes to three more of 
our lads who, as this is written, have left us for the bureau, to wit : 
Eisenstat, Gernert and Kelleher. . . . Good luck to Sergeant Valle 
on his new assignment as plainclothes supervisor. We're indeed sorry 
to see him go. 

28th PRECINCT: Four more of our friends here in the 28th 
have said "good-by" by way of retirement — Bob Sweeney, Bill Jones, 
Mike Termi and Bill Ryan. Their familiar faces will be missed, but 
we unanimously extend our heartiest wishes for a happy and long 
life to all of them ! ! . . . Twenty awards for departmental recogni- 
tion were bestowed upon nineteen of our members in the January 
orders. Commendations went to Sgt. Roy Hatem, Mike Armstrong, 
Jim MuUins, Milt Kletsky, Frank Mulrooney, Dick Beale, Artie 
Hill, George Rieu-Sicart, Charlie Leftwich, Fred Lucas, Jim Worthy, 
Red Alpern and Joe Healy; Meritorious Police Duty awards to 
Moe Plotkin and James "Tom" Brown; and citations for Ex- 
cellent Police Duty to Charlie Chisholm, Vince Nevello, Charlie 
Coates, and two for industrious Bill Jarema! . . .Congratulations 
to Joe Andricoskj', on being "booted upstairs" to the division 
office, and Zach Sosis and Walter Polinsky, new clerical men. In- 
cidentally, after learning to call Walter "Pogie", we now have to 
learn to call him "Polly !" . . . While bestowing congratulations, 
we all extend same to Inspector Cornelious J. Lyons, on his pro- 
motion, and welcome Deputy Inspector Edward F. Stanley back 
to our environs ! . . .Incidentally Sgt. Steve Sokol, our alumnus, 
now a tree surgeon in the 26th Pet., deser\-es a rousing round 
of applause on his fine exhibition of fidelity and honesty, wherein 
he with the arresting officers in the famous gold bullion case, 
rejected the culprit's offer of $10,000!! Jim K.'s face could be 
very red after that ! ! . . . "Doctors" Walter Donovan and Daniel 
Boiko are almost ready to put out their shingle, as "Obstetricians 
to Madame", having passed with flying colors in their recent 
delivery ! Mother, child and patrolmen doing very well ! . . . Wasn't 
(Continued on nexf page) 




DEIGHAN, RYAN AND REMAULDO in their prime. 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-rcon«nu.d; 



that joe- U.i.-i.'i uii ilic wrong side of the blackboard during classes 
at the Police Academy? . . . Bobbj- "K.O." O'Brien has certainly 
lived up to his dad's build-up. Only in the future he's going to 
wear button shoes ! . . . The 28th Precinct was awarded the trophy 
donated b\- the Police Athletic League for winning the Indoor Track 
Oiamiiionship of Manhattan. The event took place at the 168th 
Armory on January 21, 1952. They go on from here to compete in 
the N.Y. City finals at a later date. Judging from their form at the 
borough finals it surely looks as though they will be tough com- 
petitors for the other boroughs in the finals ! ! . . . Our Super-Investi- 
gating Squad has unearthed a rare old print showing three of New 
York's Finest of a rare old vintage some 25 \ears ago— and for the 
information of the uneducated, the stalwart gendarmes are, from 
left to right, Frankie Deigham, pointing an unloaded .38 calibre 
fore-finger at Bill Ryan, seated, with General Mike Remauldo, the 
unbiased witness ! ! Bill is joining Frank and Mike in retirement and 
we wish tliem a long and happy life! 

BRONX 

43rd PRECINCT: Well we don't have to tell you this is the 
month of the exam. Ah, we didn't want to be sergeants, anyhow 
. . . P.B.A. President Carton last month hailed an announcement 
by the Hempstead P.B.A. that their police now have a 56 hour 

swing between tours as a step 
towards our own goal of a 40 hour 
week . . .In Albany the State 
Conference of Policemen has made 
headway in the sponsoring of the 
bill which will give us a 40 hour 
week. It had been passed two 
years in a row by the Assembly 
but the Senate refused to consider 
it. -As a result of the State Con- 
ference of Policemen in the past 
three years, police in 23 communi- 
ties in N.Y. State have won the 
40 hour week . . . There are several 
bills in the assembly which pro- 
vide for the paying of Civil Ser- 
vice employees time and half for 
overtime . . . There is a bill in 
Congress which will provide a 
$2500 income tax exemption on 
pensions of federal, state, and 
municipal employees . . . The newspaper, "The Chief" states that 
police and firemen will get a $400 raise if the transit workers and 
teachers are not included, otherwise it will be $200 . . . The P.B.A. 
is trying to get us two tours off for Christmas and New Years as 
all other city employees get those days off . . . Congratulations to 
Ray Keane and wife, Kay on the birth of their daughter in Jaii- 
uary; also to John Pawluk and wife, Mae on the arrival of their 
second daughter . . . (John is pulling another Eddie Cantor) . . . 
Marriage is like a mortgage on a home; if you don't keep up the 
interest you soon find yourself out in the cold . . . We see that an 
ex Sgt. of ours. Milt Zarchin, is back in the -Army as a colonel . . . 
You know, our five boys: Bob Scully, Johnny Hughes, Kieran 
Burke, Larry Hollowell, and Jerry Luttinger have been gone a long 
time. Hope to see them back soon . . . We saw Tony Perrino up 
at Orchard Beach the other day. He's liable to become a beach- 
comber . . . Tony LaRocco is doing all right in the bureau. He 
and his partner broke a homicide case and apprehended a couple 
of stick-up men . . . Sorry to hear Al Wenz broke his ankle at the 
scene of a fire . . . Al Nolan hurt his foot recently but we see he's 
back on the job . . . We saw a nightstick down at the police museum 
just like the one Eddie Oswald carries . . . Heard that the widening 
of Williamsbridge Road will bring the street through the middle of 
the S. H. 1 1 . . . How come the magazines disappear so quickly now? 
Someone must be peddling them . . . Jack O'Leary was assaulted 
the other day by a character who was booked for felonious assault 
after he came back from the hospital , . . Sgt. Jack Isaacson was 
recently installed as marshal of the Shomrim Society for 1952 . . . 




43RD's BOB ANDO with off- 
spring, Peggy (8 months) and 
Barbara (2 years). 



Everybody is running for P.B.A. delegate. Must be a good job; 
we'd run ourselves if we were paid up. It's going to take two men 
to fill John Weis' job . . . We see that those two 12th Division plain- 
clothesmen, Ferdinand Benincasa and Andrew Cilanti who got the 
info that broke the $114,000 jewel robbery were made 3rd grade 
detectives by the P.C. . . . How come (says one of tlie Art. 1 men) 
that in the last precinct election for P.B.A. delegate when he voted 
for himself the final tally showed no votes for him? . . . In the 
WHO dcpt: WHO left his relief with two flat tires? . . . WHO in 
the 1st Sqd. put in for the bikes? . . . WHO in Sec. 2 was seen 
simonizing his 1928 Ford? . . . WHO had to use a blow-torch to 
warm baby's bottle? (the juice went out) . . . WHO in Sec. 3 
wears his cap with a "50" mission crush? . . . WHO is the re- 
corder who hasn't paid any P.B.A. dues with the expectation that 
he'll soon be eligible to join the Sgt's Benevolent Assn? . . . WHO 
are known as Jack and Jock? . . . WHO is the student attending 
two civil service schools and the Police Academy? . . . WHO 
turned out for a tour of duty and left the motor running in his own 
auto? (J.G.) . . . WHO borrowed Frank Monagahan's billy and 
didn't return it for 6 weeks? . . . WHO removed the hub cap and 
loosened two bolts on the wheel of a radio car when it had a flat 
tire and found he was working on the wrong wheel? . . . WHO 
on a run at 2 a.m., one recent morning, climbed into the bedroom 
window of the wrong apartment? (His partner can hear the woman 
never made the same mistake once ... A husband is what is left 
screaming yet) . . . WHO is threatening to retire again? . . . WHO 
got five years' wear out of his cap? ... A bachelor is a man who 
of a sweetheart after the life has been taken out . . . See you next 
month, and look out for those loaded questions. 

BROOKLYN 

66th PRECINCT: Retired Ptl. Eddie Donegan met Retired Lt. 

McCormack (otherwise known as The Kid) the other day, and here 
are the Kid's word's "If we lose out in the soup court we'll take 
it to the court of apples, but of course there are a lot of guys tak- 
ing a Rop." (Translation: Soup court is the supreme court and court 
of apples is the court of appeals and ROP is Run Out Powder.) 
The Kid is still the same as you can see ! . , . And of course Gentle- 
man John Murphy still walks his stint around Prospect Park way. 
That Old Breed never say die. Jack Reid, Jimmy Carpenter and 
Sgt. Tom Mulligan will be missed around here too. We are all wish- 
ing you fellows a lot of luck in your new endeavors. .\n(\ speaking 
of luck . . . loads of it to you new policemen who have joined the 




AO/ r^o, <Poff4/?rr /^/cpt ^ao/rA^£f^^ 



y 



34 — 



66th . . . Charlie Keenaii will be around with that Lung Tester. 
You young guys should do well with it (like Al Hamaty did) . . . 
And speaking of young and old, looks like the Rookies Softball 
Team can now really beat the Old Timers. Has Mike (Gaylord 
Hauser) Frank given you his diet for longevity and strength? 
I had the pleasure of meeting The Mrs. Steier . . . and take it from 
me she is swell, fellows. Congratulations and loads of luck Walter 
. . . Murmurings from Lenny Abbazia : "Please Lou, don't send 
my car away" . . . Lamb Cone looks good since he got married, 
eh wot? March 29th is S Day. The Gas Pipe, Stilleto, and Rope 
will be in evidence the day after . . . Oh well, every four years 
it's tlie same . . . McQueeny's older boy won the history prize 
sponsored by the American Legion. Isn't that great? And when 
you mention the American Legion, why, you veterans ought to 
come in to see yours truly. I'd sure like to have some more com- 
pany from the 66th at the Sheridan Post. It's a swell little outfit. 

69tli PRECINCT: Hello again: your faithful reporter greets 
you once again and will try to get all the news to you and yours : 
. . .Best wishes from all in the command to Charlie Ferrin, Con- 
nie Yandola, and to Robert Botig in their new ranks, and welcome 
to our fold to Sgt. Janowitz and Lt. Goloshin . . . Herman Ruff 
sends a note of thanks to the boys for their thoughtful gesture . . . 
Rave notices are being given to Nick Lisante (the man of many 
voices) for his wire recording production of station house person- 
alities . . . Congratulations to Sol Robbins for a good job. (P.S. 
he was cited in the last orders) . . . Sammy Applebaum is hum- 
ming "Here Comes the Bride" ... It is true that Asher the Slasher 
has his hats designed by Lillie Dache? . . . John Murray still 
throwing his chest out in the back room ... Rumor has it that 
Luke Menella used to model. It seems he drank grape juice and 
modeled for fountain pens. That was before he lost weight, of 
course . . . Lt. Horn and his muscle men still lifting the old chair. 
P.S. there's nothing to it??????? Anybody notice the muscles on 
Santo DeLuca, since he became a home owner ??????? Well that's 
all for this issue— If any of you have any items that you feel 
would be of interest to all, just let me know — How? You ask. 
Well, just tell it to McClusky. He'll tell it to O'Keef who will 
tell it to Sam Sief who will tell it to Griffith who w-ill tell it to**** 
Well I'll hear it somewhere, so what's the use. Your faitliful 
reporter— HRJISTZXBNMKLDEF. 

70tli PRECINCT: Congratulations are in order for Sgt. Brad- 
ley (68 Pet) in attaining the grade of lieutenant. All of the men 
in the command wish him the best ... a real swell guy . . . The 70th 
Pet. sergeants really knocked over the last lieutenant's exam. Sgts. 
McGowan, McWalters, and Jasinski are well up on the list. Con- 
gratulations ! . . . With the sergeant's test only four weeks away, 
the boys are really hitting the books. It used to be customary when 
you passed a fellow patrolman to say "hello." Now they greet one 
another with some such salutation as: "What are the duties of a 
desk officer?" or "How many UF 61 's are made out on a DO A?" 
It's not a bad idea either. The only drawback is that the halls be- 
come congested when the other fellow gives a questionable answer. 
Then all within ear-shot of the dabte chime in. Oh well, everything 
will be peace and quiet on March 30th. Or will it? . . . The boys 
had a wonderful time at the bachelor party for young Bob Howard, 
w-ho contemplates entering the field of matrimony in the near future. 
Bill Rutigilano took motion pictures of the affair and we are all 
patiently waiting for the results . . . Whatever happened to the 
Venison Steaks? Or was it a rabbit these big hunters shot, up in the 
wilds of New York State? 

Once again it becomes our pleasure to welcome into the 70th 
Precinct's happy family new members : Nick Centoducati, N'incent 
Coppola, Eugene Begley, Aurelio DeFilippi, Robert Perry, Edwin 
Stevens, and Philip Zaccone. 

Some of our eager students have signed up in Professor Furst's 
Memory Course. They reason it may help them in preparing for 
the big test. I hope they don't do what one of our fellow members 
did when he was studying how to improve his memory. He used 
to study from the Memory Book on the way to and from each 
tour. The young man did this for a few months, until one day 
we noticed he didn't have the book under his arm. You couldn't 
help but notice it because of the size. We asked him what happened 



to his Memory Book. He replied, "Oh that, I left it on the subway 
train." 

If you fellows have anything of note that would be of interest 
to us all, please see your reporter at the P.A.L. office. We'll gladly 
put it in our column. 

81sl PRECINCT. The 81st Precinct is sporting a lot of new 
faces lately. Many of the old ones are missing and are missed: 
Sergeant Casey with his stories about the good old days ; Frank 
Crane, the peddlers' nemesis and Mike Reilly, who's now out in 
California living the life of Reilly. Good luck to you all and happy 
retirement . . . Reynolds after years of patient study has finally 
attained to the position of first broom . . . Smitty has a big smile 
these days; I wonder whj? . . . John Lynch now roaming the 
wilds of Prospect Park wearing stripes, and he's no zebra. Best of 
luck John . . . That "sly" man, McGroarty, would like to know 
why Vella wears gloves, especially when tossing a salad on Friday 
. . . Civil Defense under Sergeant Most, is doing a bang-up job. 
Our Light Duty Rescue Truck, equipped with public address sys- 
tem, is shown being inspected by Captain Metz. One of our good 
friends in the precinct has been very generous in donating the 
truck to us . . . Welcome to Lieutenant Heller, Lieutenant Veno- 
kur and Sergeant Caffrey . . . We're sorry to lose Lieutenant 
Dunwoody and Sergeant Sullivan . . . Benny Bohland is now in a 
position to "brief" you on unemployment insurance, and if you're 
in need of legal advice see that "nice man" Brady . . . We hope 
Loughran and Seward will be back with us real soon . . . We all 
sympathize with Ed Gorman and the pain he developed in his left 
arm all from hard work no doubt . . . Congratulations to our new 
P.B.A. Delegate, Joe Gallagher, and as a parting note, who is the 
sergeant who likes to attend conferences? 





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CAPTAIN METZ looks over newly-donated rescue truck. 

QUEENS 

102ncl PRECINCT: Our condolences are extended to the 
family of Marshall McMahon, the former 102 civilian cleaner, who 
passed away last month. ... In recent turnover in personnel, we 
lost George Peterson and George Dehler, via retirement, and 
Arthur Dunn and William Cook who were detailed to the Police 
Lab. . . . We welcome back once again, Joe Bunce, who returns 
after a short sojourn with the Quartermasters . . . Peterson is now 
gainfully employed at a large aviation company in Farmingdale . . . 
Our oldest member, Leonard Brandenberger, will be 63 on March 20 
— chin up Len, there is still hope of a court reversal . . . Our baby 
derby keeps rolling along — This time Arnold Sableski and McGuire 
have kept batting averages soaring, by announcing the births 
of a son and daughter respectively. Our best to moms and babes . . . 
That old sick bug has hit again. William EUer, our smiling (only 
when collecting coffee money) attendant is bedded at Bellevue with 
mysterious ailment and Sgt. Smith is also bed-ridden . . . Belated 
bouquets to Ernie Schmid for making 300 PAL'ers happy by play- 
ing Santa Claus at their Christmas Party. Did a good job too, sans 
pillow . . .How is the bowling team doing this year or should one 
ask? . . . Sgt. G's daughter recently presented him with a cook book. 
Now all he does is brag about the fancy dishes he concocts . . . 

(Continued on page 37) 



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LOOKING 'EM OVER-fCon«n„ed; 



What Sergeants' chauffeur lets his pay checks accummulate at the 
desk? . . .Who has been sneaking all those free shines? . . . News 
clipping on the bulletin board referred to a girl friend of a Tierney 
(could it be ours?) who called off their marriage twice, because 
"he wasn't sure of what he wanted" . . . Sgt. Coleman rejoicing 
now that he has swapped the desk for patrol duty . . . The bellow- 
ing heard on Feb. 1 was due to the price of coffee going up to 
ten cents. The attendants are now doubly insulated about the mud 
they brew . . . Now we know what put EUer in the hospital . . . 
Students Tierney, Parsons, Winter, Frank Benson. Shemet and 
Mc.Mlister are seen daily debating tricky questions. Fauls, our best 
bet to top them all, usually steps in and enlightens the boys when- 
ever the)''re in doubt . . . The students are now volunteering mis- 
leading questions and wrong answers so as to prevent their col- 
leagues from besting them on March 29 . . . Who was the first 
102 man to file for the Sgt. exam? 

Men of the Month — Recent awards were issued to Edward 
Shemet, who received an Excellent Police Duty and Joe O'Neill 
a Meritorious Police Duty. Ed gained his honor while attached to 
the 74th, when he apprehended, after a long chase, one of two 
occupants of a stolen car. O'Neill, received his award for appre- 
hending, after a hair raising chase in which two guns and proceeds 
of a robbery were discarded from the fleeing car, one of two occu- 
pants who later proved to be wanted for many other jobs. Excel- 
lent work men, congratulations! . . . Well it looks like the 102, 
and eventually the people's choice for PBA president, Charles Bren- 
nan, will win out for all. That is, if and when the need for a new 
man is shown in the May election. Charlie has been one of the 
main cogs in the PBA machine for many years and knows exactly 
what the men need and want. So come May, Charlie, you decide 
to throw your hat in the ring, the 102 will back you up to the hilt. 



TRAFFIC 

TRAFFIC A: The command was plunged in deep gloom when 
it heard of the sudden death of Patrolman John Boyce, who only 
a short time before had turned out with us, apparently in the best 
of health. To those left behind and to all the other members who 
lost loved ones this past month may we join in your sorrow and 
offer our deepest sympathies ... A hearty welcome to our new 
members, and don't feel slighted if I've missed your name, for some 
place, somewhere, somehow, I'll hear or see something which will 
get you in print. . . . That streak you see moving towards Pennsyl- 
vania on weeks-ends is just Agustine A., making a visit to the neigh- 
boring state. What goes ???... The best of all to Ptl. Mullins and 
the Mrs. Now maybe he'll be able to keep his mind on his work . . . 
Holiday Greetings were received by the dozens for all our former 



INSPECTOR JONES HEADS YOUTH CONFERENCE 

At a meeting held at Union City, New Jersey, on January 14, 
Inspector John J. Jones, Juvenile Aid Bureau, was elected presi- 
dent of the Inter-City Police Conference on Youth Activities. 
Other members elected were: 1st Vice President: Det. Joseph 
Marke, Irvjngton, N. J.; Secretary: Det. Walter J. Havens, Ho- 
boken. New Jersey. 

This is an organization comprised of twenty-one member 
cities in the eastern part of the United States, including Balti- 
more, Rochester, Newark, Philadelphia, New York City, Trenton, 
Elizabeth, Mount Vernon, Bayonne, and Hoboken. 

Its purpose is to provide an exchange of information on 
youth problems and applied procedures; to promote competi- 
tion in the field of sports and related activities; and, in general, 
be a constructive force in the interest of youth and the promo- 
tion of friendly relations among cities or specified geographical 
subdivisions represented on the conference. 




I HE9R\) 5H0OTINQ, 50 I CflME IN TO IMVESTIQRTE/ 



members, and to them we wish our best. Drop in boys, anytime. 
You're always welcome . . . Best wishes to our sergeants who hit 
the lieutenant's list. (4 out of 5) and may success follow them 
along their path ... So come on you cops. See if you can top 
this record on the coming sergeant's exam. . . .Ptl. Quinlivan, who 
is Ptl. Tierney's shadow, must be thinking it's a family job, with 
sons in uniform, and his daughter taking the next policewoman's 
exam. It looks like he's taking over . . . False rumors that McCloskey 
and Noonan are using TinTair and Toni wave lotion . . . When 
Times Square details are posted, what two Ptl. of the Canal 
Street Squad, look to see if one or both are slated to go. To keep 
peace, they both go. Smart man that Joe Henry . . . For a color 
television treat, the members shed their overcoats, and see the dis- 
play of Christmas shirts. Wow! ! ! Are they red? (The shirts that is) 
. . . Optimism is fine in its place. Don't push it too far, like Ptl. 
Girko making a date for Sunday on Thursday . . . Welcome home, 
George. After 17 months hitch as a retread in the Air Force, Ptl. 
Brand returns to the fold. Just like you left it, George. The work 
is still here . . . Chief ground hog, Ptl. Larkin and his shadow 
Ptl. Bossert, keeping the Battery Underpass working in tip-top 
shape . . . Perpetual questions : Hey Delegate, how about more 
money ? Perpetual answer : No comment, or as the up-and-coming 
barrister Ptl. Gold says, We all rest. 

TRAFFIC I : The entire command extends its deepest sym- 

pathy to Chief of Detectives Loures on the loss of his wife and to 
Ptl. Lederman of Tr. T on the loss of his sister . . . Ptl. Jack Healy, 
"Acting Colonel" of the B'klyn Army Base is back from sick leave 
and traffic in and out of the base, wi41 once again proceed normally 
. . . That proud look on Tom Pritchard's face is because his son. 
Marine Sgt. Tom Jr., is on the road home from Korea where he 
spent the last year in the front lines . . . Congrats to Lorenzetti on 
his promotion to the bureau and to Ptl. Goldenberg on his specta- 
cular arrest . . . Welcome to the new BRASS Lts. Dore and Kelly 
and Sgt. Walsh. May their stays be long and happy ones . . . Sorry 
though to see Sgt. LaTour leave even if he did get promoted. Our 
loss is a terrific gain for Traffic 'K' Seen along Flatbush Ave. doing 
a little plainclothes sleuthing Sgt. Jack Padden and his roly poly 
assistant Rags McPadden otherwise known as "$20 no-change- 
Daniel." . . . All the men of Tr. T bid a fond farewell to our 
one and only Willie Schecher, who left us for the Property Clerk. 

(Continued on page 39) 



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LOOKING 'EM OVER-rconKnu.</; 



Marine Corps Provost Marshal 




CAPTAIN JOHN D. IRELAND (left) appointed Provost Marshal 
of Marine Corps Auxiliary Air Station, Edenton, North Carolina, 
receives the good v/ishes of Major Robert F. Graham, Command- 
ing Officer of Marine Air Base Squadron 11, Cherry Point, 
North Carolina. Ordered to extended active duty last October 
with other Marine Fighter Squadron 132 reservists from Floyd 
Bennett Field in Brooklyn, Captain Ireland is a motorcycle pat- 
rolman assigned to Grand Central Parkway Precinct. 



He cannot be replaced, but we will miss him and his hot gripes 
(????). With Ptl. Schecher gone the Station House will be as quiet 
as a church EXCEPT for sound effects and our own Irish Tenor 
Tom O'Brien formerly of the Kate Smith Hour . . .. That's all for 
now, so let's dig up some info for the next edition and give it to 
our new Clerical Man, Hank Keck, who has a tough job to fill but 
I'm sure he w'ill do okay. 

TRAFFIC K: Slowly but surely the hands of time are replac- 
ing the old vanguard of \'ernon Ave. Mike Struber and Tom 
Kearney have finally seen fit to retire their weapons and become 
distinguished members of the civilian community. If this keeps up 
the retired men will soon outnumber the active force. The 63-year 
clause didn't dampen the ambition of Walter Delahunty who wasted 
no time in attaching himself to a steamship company— the start of 
a new career for this young fellow . . . Sgt. (Papa) Hughes will 
long be remembered for his kindly supervision and nimble de.xterity 
that belied his age. Out since the first of the year, he is conval- 
escing at his home 2025 E. 3Sth St. Bklyn, from illness that has 
him temporarily bedridden . . . Lt. Tyne took a surprising leap 
across the river and landed amidst the masonry of Traf. B. His 
genial manner will prove an added asset to that noble house. Lt. 
La Tour takes up the slack with his highly welcome promotion to 
"K" . . . Sgt Ringw-ald chalks up his 25th year in blue . . . Sgt. 
Wenig vying with Sgt. Burke of "I" for literary honors of the 
district. . . . Congr.^tulations Dept. : Cecil Johnson steps into the 
spotlight because of his alert capture of a fleeing felon. Lennie 
Malkin next in line with an apprehension of two would-be juvenile 
criminals. Let's have a nice round of applause here, boys . . . Ptl. 
Walsh enlarging his chest measurment with a junior addition to his 
pantry. Sam Block, a new entry in the Stork Sweepstakes, received 
his first bundle, a boy recently. See Pete Leis for diaper service. 
After hearing the above gurgles of joy, John Nelle hastily deserted 
the lonely ranks of bachelorhood and is now a newly appointed 
member of the ball and chain association. Keep us posted on latest 
developments . . . Joe Holzman and Al Martino feeling great and 
looking proud after donating blood. This is one accomplishment 
EVERY man should participate in and reap a harvest of inner 
satisfaction . . . Hopskotching the Burg for News : Many a 
Manual is being worn to a frazzle with the approach of the com- 
ing Sgt. exam. On the day following the test the Fire Dept. has 
granted our request to man the outside of the station house with a 



net crew. You can still see Pete Leis for choice selection of fine 
rope. Miltie Getter can't wait until the test is over so he can re- 
sume beating his wife — in Canasta that is . . . Ptl. Bowen finally 
served his first summons. In the upheaval that followed, two desk 
olficers suffered nervous frustration, the service of one precinct 
was disrupted, and Harry, himself, had to be taken home in a 
state of babbling delirium . . . Murray & Tufano are low men 
on the seniority totem pole (no mustache plebes) . . . Ptl. Migliore 
is all smiles with the acquisition of a new 1952 Chevrolet . . . 
Walter Kochanski must be studying too hard. It's those flamingos ; 
they keep following him, it seems. Woosh, a flock just flew over 
that time. We're all starting to see them now. . . . The boys down in 
3rd District are getting in shape for the coming baseball season. 
They strenuously double-time around Pete Cassi in a stern endeavor 
to maintain spring training . . . The men come and go, but some- 
how the station house sits alone silent and aloof-callous to all 
change-and probably wondering what the next contingent of blue- 
coats will accomplish, to mark it's ever-lengthening history. 

DIVISION OF LICENSES: EditoVs Note: One of SPRING 
3100's most faithful reporters failed to come through with her reg- 
ular monthly column for this issue. We refer to Mrs. Rose Lupo, 
reporter for the Division of Licenses. Perplexed, we called Green- 
wich Street to find out why. A voice on the other end of the wire in- 
formed us that she was out sick. "She's knocking herself out," 
our informant said, "trying to make things easier for everybody 
else around here." It seems to us that no one could receive a nicer 
compliment, so we're taking this opportunity to pass it along to her 
and to wish her a speedy and complete recovery, in case she's still 
on the sick list when this issue appears. 



WARNING ON BLASTING CAPS 

Chief Inspector Conrad H. Rofhengast, through the Bureau 
of Orders, has directed all personnel operating department 
vehicles equipped with two-way radio 

• NOT to transport electric blasting caps in the vehicles, 
and 

• NOT to operate radio transmitters within a radius of 
150 feet of any electric blasting operations. 

The warnings are based on information that there is a 
possibility that the wires of an electric blasting cap can act as 
an antenna and pick up radio energy. The radio frequency 
current may heat the bridge wire sufficiently to cause the cap 
to explode. This occurs when the configuration of the wires is 
just right and the radio transmitter is close enough. 

The order also called the attention of the members of the 
force to the provisions of the Manual of Procedure relative to 
handling explosives. (Article 13, Paragraphs 64 to 71). 

THE RECORD SPEAKS 

(Coniinued from page 21) 

ant. The shot etitered the back of the felon's neck and 
loda:ed in his brain, killing him instantly." 

NEWSPAPER: "Right, and don't forget, the P.C. 
made him a Third Grade Detective." 

S.O. 900: "Shucks. I know that!" 

ARREST RECORD : "Psssst, fellows. That cop who's 
been getting a transcript of my arrest No. 1152 has been 
eavesdropping all along. He looks psycho enough to me to 
want to write a story about us, and what is more, he looks 
like the tvpe who would try to have it published in 
SPRING 3100." 

R. & F.B. 19: "What are you worrying about?" 

D.D. 5, SERIAL No. 711 : "To listen to you guys gib- 
bering^. one would never think that this matter is on record 
as CASE CLOSED. 



39 



if I 



in^^^IXm 



IN SERVICE 




Nome Appoinfed Command Died 

Lt. Edward M. Barry May 19, 1920 30fh Pet Jan. 24, 1952 

PtI. Joseph J. D'Elia Dec. 1, 1931 47th Pet Jan. 24, 1952 

PtI. James MeNiff Dec. 21, 1920 18th Pet Jan. 28, 1952 



RETIRED 

Capt. Richard Gray Oct. 24, 1896 Old Bklyn.Hq Jan. 

102nd Div. Jan. 

Det. Div. Jan. 

1st Pet. Jon. 

lllth Pet Jan. 

67th Pet Jan. 

Old 149th Pet. Jan. 

lllth Pet Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Jan. 



Capt. Joseph Hemley Feb. 7, 1903 

Capt. Thomas Tunney Dee. 28, 1897 

Lt. Joseph A. Walsh April 1, 1907 

Lt. Martin Conneely Dee. 6, 1913 

Sgt. William A. Hartery Sept. 27, 1905 

Sgt. William Gerhold Jan. 8, 1896 

Sgt. Peter La Marca Feb. 28, 1907 

Sgt. James F. Barrett April 15, 1912 122nd Pet 

Sgt. John G. P. Schmauder April 19, 1910 n2th Pet 

PtI. James Brennon Oct. 18, 1917 6th Pet 

PtI. Leonard J. Woodle Jan. 3, 1898 Det. Div 

Pt 
Ft 
Pt 



Pt 
Pt 
Ptl 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 
Pt 



Jan. 

James J. Healy Jan. 10, 1927 103rd Pet Jan. 

John J. Cunningham July 1, 1931 110th Pet. Jan. 

Thomas F. Marron July 16, 1901 Old 17th Div. Dee. 



. Harold J. CafFerata Dec. 2, 1924 

. Henry F. Rope Sept. 13, 1901 

. Albert T. Rohloff Sept. 25, 1905 

. Maurice V. Daly Feb. 24, 1928 

. Edwin P. Hayes Aug. 13, 1919 

. Benedict J. Oswald June 3, 1907 

. Edward F. Larkin July 3, 1928 

. Matthew Corry Jan. 10, 1921 

. James Murray Aug. 12, 1903 Old 24th Pet. Jan. 

. Edward J. Ronan Jan. 20, 1927 26th Pet. Feb. 

. Edmund O. Meyers June 2, 1926 120th Pet. Feb. 

. Patrick Holly Aug. 13, 1903 Old 8-A Pet Feb. 



Old 2nd Pet. Jan. 

..Old 146th Pet Jan. 

103rd Pet. Jan. 

Det. Div. Jan. 

62nd Pet. Jan. 

84th Pet. Jan. 

Det. Div. Jan. 

17th Pet Jan. 



19, 1952 
28, 1952 
26, 1952 
26, 1952 

17, 1952 
11, 1952 

18, 1952 

22, 1952 
5, 1952 

5, 1952 
10, 1952 
10, 1952 

6, 1952 

15, 1952 
3, 1951 

16, 1952 

19, 1952 

20, 1952 

23, 1952 
18, 1952 
25, 1952 
27, 1952 
30, 1952 
23, 1952 

2, 1952 

3, 1952 
6, 1952 



4U- 



WANTED BY THIS DEPARTMENT 



ASSAULT AND ROBBERY 




PHOTO TAKEN 1931 
Age 29 



WILLIAM SUTTON 

Alias Julian Loring, George Holland, Richa 
Courtney, Richard Loring and Edward 



Age, 49 years; height, 5 feet, S'/a Inclwiv " 

Han o^B^^r 



^eldh^ 



pounds; blue eyes; medium chestnu^j^^^ fok^^niplexion; 
medium build. .a^^-^1^ ^^ 

Manufactur- 

March 

rrant has 



and ben^^3rr( 



Wanted for the robbery pf 
er's Trust Company, Long tslond 
9, 1950. He has been indicted 
been issued. 

Sutton is considered by veteran law enforcement of 
ficers to be without peer in the undvworld as a conceiver 
and user <rf disguises to pefAetrate crimes. He has 
seemed to specialize in bonk roboery and has, in the past, 
gained entry to premises, outside of business hours, by 
posing as police .offeW, Western Union messenger and 
mailman. 

He escaped from Sing Sing Prison in 1932 and from 
Eastern State Penitentiary in Pennsylvania in 1947, for 
both of which escapes he is also wanted. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 46 



$26,000 REWARD -WORLD'S FAIR BOMB EXPLOSION 



The Board of Estimate of the City of New York unanimously 
voted to appropriate $25,000 reward and the Detectives' Endowment 
Association of the Police Department, City of New York, has voted 
$1,000 reward for the apprehension, or for information leading to 
the apprehension and conviction of the individual or individuals, or 
organizations, that placed, or had any connection with placing, an 
infernal machine or bomb in the British Pavilion at the World's Fair, 
which, after being carried from the Pavilion to a vacant part of the 
Fair Grounds by members of this Department, exploded on Thursday, 
July 4, 1940, at about 4:40 p.m., causing the death of two detectives 
and injuries to other detectives. 



All information and the identity of persons furnishing it will 
be kept strictly confidential, and if the informant is not required as 
an essential witness and he so desires, the source of the information 
will not be disclosed. 

Persons having information should communicate in person or by 
telephone with Chief of Detectives' Office, Police Headquarters, 
Manhattan, 240 Centre Street, Telephone CAnal 6-2000. 

If more than one person is entitled to the reward, it will be pro- 
portionately distributed, and the Police Commissioner shall be the 
sole judge as to its distribution. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1940 
Age 22 



Homicide 

John Guisto — White; age 33 years; height, 5 
feet, 8 inches; weight 170 pounds; blue eyes; 
brown hair ; wanted for homicide of Wil- 
liam Lurye, who was stabbed to death on June 
21, 1949 at 224 W. 35th Street, N.Y.C. He has 
been indicted by New York County Grand Jurj' 
and a bench warrant has been issued. Accomp- 
lice in this crime, Benedict Macri, surrendered 
to authorities on June 18, 1950. A $25,000.00 
reward has been offered by the International 
Ladies' Garment Workers Union for the arrest 
and conviction of the killers of William Lurve. 



Homicide and Felonious Assault 

Salverio Lopes Lagoeiro — alias Salverio 
Lopes Da Silva — Age 55 years; height 5 feet, 
11^4 inches; weight 190 pounds; dark brown 
eyes and hair; dark complexion; scar under- 
neath chin; pit mark over left eye; a Portu- 
guese ; occupation, a longshoreman ; He is 
wanted for the shooting and killing of Joseph 
J. Serria, and shooting and wounding Felix 
Longo on board a barge at Pier 15, East River, 
New York, on November 14, 1941. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1941 
Age 45 




PHOTO TAKEN 1946 
Age 22 



Homicide 

McKinley Seals — alias Dukey — Age 27 

years; height, 5 feet, 6 inches; weight, 135 
pounds ; maroon eyes ; black hair ; occupation, 
machine operator. He is wanted for shooting 
and killing Jerville Goodman on April 11, 1947. 
He has been indicted and bench warrant has 
been issued. 



Homicide 

Oc McLeod — Age 43; height 5 feet, 6^4 
inches; weight 138 pounds; brown eyes; black 
hair. He is wanted in connection with the 
perpetration of a homicide by stabbing, at 
Far Rockaway, Queens on -August 1, 1951. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 40 



Membert of the Force who ore successful in the apprehension of any person described on this page or who may obtain information v/hich 

will lead to his arrest will receive Deportmentoi Recognition. 

GEORGE P. MONAGHAN, Po/ice Commissioner. 



IH 





APRIL, 



19 5 2 





Vol. 23 



No. 4 



FRANK FRISTENSKY, JR. 

Firtt Deputy Cammi»>ioner 



PtI. Joseph A. Callahan 

Polw. Yetta Cohn 

PtI. Thomas P. Connors 



A MAGAZINE FOR POLICEMEN 
FRANK D. DOYLE 

Secretary of the Department, Editor 

CONRAD H. ROTHENGAST 

Chief Inspector 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Sgl. William M. Hombrecht 



In This Issue 



EDITORIAL 

NEWSPAPER AWARD 

PURSESNATCHERS 

PRESS CREDENTIALS 

THE OLD FORTY-NINER 

TOP COMMAND 

CODES ARE FRAGILE 

ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK 

POLICE LODGERS 

THE RECIDIVIST— Short Story 

LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

BROWSING IN THE LIBRARY 

DOWN THE LINE 

STUDY HALL 

RETIREMENTS 



Poge 

1 

2 

3 

6 

8 

9 

10 

14 

18 

20 

22 

23 

24 

27 

29 



LOOKING EM OVER 30-31 ■32-33-34-35 36-39 

AMENDMENTS 37-38 

IN MEMORIAM 40 

PRECINCT REPORTERS 

Ptl. Robert Wille (1 si Pet.); PtI. Michael C. Zopf 
(3rd Pet.); Ptl. Nicholas Perrino (13th Pet.); Ptl. 
Charles F. Sullivan, Jr. (22nd Pet.); Ptl. Anthony 
J. Lojocono (23rd Pet); Ptl. John Peller (25th 
Pet.); Ptl. Raymond R. Wieboldt (28th Pet.); Ptl. 
Carl H. Crawford (30th Pel.); Ptl. Don Crowley 
ond Ptl. Gene loewy (43rd Pel.); Ptl. Ed M. Singer 
;44th Pel); Ptl. E. A. Gray (52nd Pel.); Ptl. Peter 
Loeatelli (66lh Pet.); Pll. Nicholas J. Rivono i84th 
Pel.); Pll. Nicholos Parpon 1 102nd Pel.); Del. Addie 
Knowles (PWB); Mrs. Rose Lupo (Div of Licenses). 



Published by the Police Deportment, 
City of New York. 

Copyright, 1952, by the Police Deportment, 
City of New York. 

No port of this publication moy be reproduced 

in whole or in part without written permission 

from the editor. 

Address oil communications to SPRING 3100, 
400 Broome .^ireet. New York 13, N. Y. 



Letters 



Reference Book 

Dear Editor; 

Would it be possible for you to mail this deport- 
ment a copy of SPRING 3100 each lime it is 
published. Several of our sergeants ore now 
attending o police school in Mount Vernon, New 
York and your magazine is a reference book for 
the school. 

PTL. FRANCIS P. MURPHY 
Department of Police 
Port Chester, New York. 



Errant Copies 

Dear Sir: 

I hove often wondered if there isn't something 
you could do to provide a more efficient and 
equitable distribution of your fine magozine. 1 
know that the fault does not lie with the men 
who publish SPRING 3100, but the fact remains 
that at least half the lime I don't get my copy 
of the magazine. I thought that perhops you 
could suggest to those charged with the distribution 
of the mogozine that Ihey take some steps to see 
to it thol each man gets his copy by preventing 
other men from taking several. Or perhaps you 
could institute o system of putting names on the 
magazines or mailing them out. ... I do think 
thot something needs to be done. Many of the 
men in our house hove complained about not 
getting their copies so I decided to drop a line 
and apprise you of the situation. 

A PATROLMAN. 

(Editor's Note: SPRING 3100 hos received sev- 
ere/ complaints of this nature from precincts oil 
over the city. We think that this patrolman has 
a legitimate complaint. The problem is a precinct 
one and it appears to us thot it con only be 
solved on that level. We try each month to gel 
the mogozine to the stotion houses by the last 
day of eoch month so thot they con be picked up 
by our reoders ot the time they pick up their 
checks. II would seem a simple task lor the 
precinct stoff to see thot eoeh member gets his 
copy. Simple justice entitles him to this much.) 



JAMES Mcelroy 

Chief of Staff 



Ptl. Joseph Gang! 
Det. James W. Magnar 
Pll. Gerald Walsh 



Memoranda 

APRIL 
1. GUARDIANS ASSN. Meeting. Clubroom. 

3. SERGEANTS ASSN. Meeting. 

ST. GEORGE ASS'N. Meeting. Masonic Build- 
ing. 

5 SHOMRIM SOC. Entertainment & Donee, Man- 
holtan Center. 

7. GREATER N.Y. POST, VFW. Meeting. Sokol 
Holl. 

8. PBA. Delegates' meeting. Werdermann Holl. 
POLICEWOMEN'S ASS'N. Meeting. Hotel Bill- 
more 5:30 P.M. 

POLICE SQUARE CLUB. Meeting. Mosonic 
Building. 

10. CAPTAINS' ASS'N. Meeting. 71st Regt. 
Armory. 

11. Good Friday. 

13. Easter Sunday 

14. POLICE GARRISON 3100. Meeting. Club- 
rooms. 

15. COLUMBIA ASSN. Meeting. Werdermann 
Hall. 

NYC POST, AL 460. Mee«ing. Jewish Guild 
8:30 P.M. 

GUARDIANS ASS'N. Meeting. Clubroom. 
State Income Tax Due. 
17. CIVILIAN COUNCIL 179. Meeting. Trial Room. 
6 P.M. 

21. SHOMRIM SOC. Meeting. Riverside Plozo 
Hotel. 

22. WM. E. SHERIDAN POST. Meeting. Clubroom. 

23. LIEUTENANTS' ASS'N. Meeting. Gov. Clinton 
Hotel. 

24. TRAFFIC SQUAD ASSN. Meeting. Monhottan 
Center 8:30 P.M. 

27. GREATER N.Y. POST, VFW. Dinner, leelond 
Restaurant 5:30 P.M. 

28. POLICE GARRISON 3100. Meeting. Clubroom. 





FRONT COVER 


LYING 


DOWN ON THE JOB is ol- 


ways 


permissible when it comes lo 


blood 


donations. Department's 


blood 


donor program is in high 


gear. 


Sign up today. 


(Photo by Detective Jomes Mogner, 




Bureou of Public Relations.: 



Thanks For Your Opinion 



"VT'OUR replies to the questionnaire which was published 
in our January issue have been tabulated. In all, 220 
completed questionnaires were received. This return, we 
consider to be quite good for the reason that this was the 
first time that you were called upon for readership participa- 
tion. Several readers phoned to explain that they did not 
want to tear the page from their magazines. One retired 
man wrote, ". . . did not use questionnaire as I pass the 
magazine on to the policemen here in town who also en- 
joy reading it." 

We recognize that the replies constitute less than two 
per cent of our readers. Yet, the pattern of the voting was 
so strong that we feel safe in assuming that it reflected the 
sentiments of the vast majority of the others. Despite the 
limited number of returned questionnaires, a definite trend 
in likes and dislikes was discernible. Here is what the 
voting showed : 

• The desire of our readers for information that would 
mU to their font of police knowledge and make them more 
efficient police officers was demonstrated by the overwhelm- 
ing populaiity of the following: 

More of Sontr Ann'iiiil 

Instructional Articles 165 42 

Informative Articles 157 57 

Amendments 143 69 

Memo Book 123 78 

Condensations 114 76 

Study Hall 102 105 

Based on these choices, the emphasis will coiUinue aldiit; 
educational and informative lines. 

• There were other categories which rated high in your 
favor. Assuming that a vote in the "more" classification 
was an indication of especial approval, we noted the popu- 
larity of these features : 

More of Same Amount 

Reprints 97 84 

Historical Articles 75 86 

Cartoons 67 117 

All in the Day's Work 55 125 

• Our "house-organ" features appear to have received a 
vote of confidence along the lines in which they are pres- 
ently being handled. The "same amount" classification 
claimed the most choices. 



More of Snmr Ain'iinit 

Newspaper Hero Awards 20 132 

Awards and Commendations 25 144 

Promotions and Graduations 11 1 42 

Looking 'Em Over 34 118 

We were especially pleased with the many fine sugges- 
tions which you offered ; and naturally, we were gratified 
by the numerous unsolicited comments. If any one com- 
ment had to be selected as representative of the group, the 
following would be it. "SPRING 3100 is great. If you 
can't do what I voted for, don't change a thing in our 
magazine. It's the best, as is." To our unknown corre- 
spondent, we say "thanks" and are extremely happy that 
he referred to SPRING 3100 as "our magazine." That is 
exactly what we have been trying to do — to make it 
"a magazine for policemen." 

Every suggestion received is being carefully weighed. In 
this issue, you will find an indication of our intent to put 
them into effect wherever possible. At your request, the 
date of retirement is included on the In Alemoriam page 
to give the entire departmental history of retired members 
who died. Likewise, we have included reprints of entire 
pages of the Manual of Procedure to replace sheets which 
have been amended frequently. Other revised pages will 
appear whenever space permits. 

Some of your other suggestions appear to have been 
anticipated. "Law Highlights" which was introduced in the 
January issue is endeavoring to supply the latest information 
from the Legal Bureau. To the retired man who wrote 
that he would "appreciate a word now and then about the 
forgotten retired cop," we refer him to the new feature 
"The Retired Ring In" which commenced with the Feb- 
ruary issue. Incidentally, the information for this page 
must, of necessity, be obtained from the men themselves or 
their friends. We have no other way of knowing what the\- 
are doing. Send us any items and photographs which would 
be of interest. 

Other of your recommendations will be acted upon as 
soon as practicable. The changes which have been made 
merely represent the start of a concerted effort to give you 
the type of magazine that meets with your approval. 



Tft^ Cif/tcf 



— 1 



O f f - D u t y P a I r o I 111 a ii W ins J o ii r n a I - A in e r i c a ii 
For Capture Of Armed Holdup Trio 



A>v 



a r 




FOLLOWING IN HIS DAD'S FOOTSTEPS. Patrolman Walter 
O'Shea holds hero citation while Police Commissioner George P. 
Monaghan turns over the Journal-American cash award to his 
sister, Mary. Patrolman O'Shea's father, retired Acting Cap- 
tain Jeremiah O'Shea, beams proudly during the ceremony in 
the Commissioner's office. 



\X 71 II LI', ilriviii^ in ci\iliaii clothing la.^l i'cljruary 25, 
'* I'atrdiinan \\ alti-r (J'Shea of the 22nd Division 
obsciNcd a man aclinsi suspiciously in front of a li(|Uor 
store in Richmond Hill, Oucens. The lime was about 8 I'.M. 
Continuing on past the .store, O'Shea made a U-turn. As he 
came hack, tvvn oilier men ran from the store, joined the 
third man, and iuiii|)ed into a car parked nearby. 

O'Shea followed in his car. The trio, realizing that he 
was trailing them, sped through the streets. As his car 
drew abreast, one of the men pointed a gun at him. 1 1(j\v- 
ever, he succeeded in forcing the car to the curb and cap- 
turing the three occupants. The men had stuck up the 
liquor store where O'Shea had first spotted them. Subse- 
quent questioning resulted in the arrest f)t three additional 
men for violation of the Sullivan law. 

A member of the department f(jr two years, O'Shea is 
a Navy veteran of World War II. He served for two and 
a half years in the Pacific abroad the cruiser "Dayton." 
Single, he is the son of retired Acting Captain Jeremiah 
O'Shea of Communications Bureau, Queens. A brother, 
Maurice, also a patrolman, is assigned to the 103rd Pet. and 
another brother, George, is a member of the New York 
City Fire Department. O'Shea was honored with the award 
by Police Commissioner Monaghan in the imsence of his 
father and his sister, Mary. 



A Metropolitan Police Force 



Editor's Note: Metropolitan police depurtinents, not to 
be confused with city, county or state orgaiii::ations, trans- 
cend normal geographical boundary lines. The Melro.politam 
London Department is perhaps one of the best ktionni. 
However, we do have such an organisation TuAthin the Unit- 
ed States, and the Police Chiefs News (January, 1952) in 
an article by Superintendent Henry R. Hayes of the Metro- 
politan District Police describes how his department func- 
tions in the area surrounding Boston, Massachusetts. The 
following e.vcerpts concerning its organization and ad- 
ministration should be of interest.) 

TiiK Metropolitan District Police, with headquarters in 
Boston, police all state propert)- within the Boston 
Metropolitan District, comprising 42 municipalities. In this 
area rjf about 600 scjuare miles the force covers over 120 
miles of boulevards, parkways and arterial highways. In 
addition it polices 15,000 acres of state reservations, includ- 
ing every ocean and river beach in the district. It has police 
power in every city and town in the Commonwealth where- 
in are located water supply, water supply stations, hydro- 
electric plants or any other installations or property ad- 
ministered by the Metropolitan District Commission, a 
state division of the government. 

Within this large area the Metropolitan District Police 
have all the authority of the local police units and can 
move freely over all city and town boundaries. They co- 
operate with and assist the local police whenever called 
upon for any kind of police duty. 

L'ncler the Massachusetts statutes the Metropolitan 
District I'olice are required to assist the state highway 
patrol of the Massachusetts Department of Public Safety 



whene\ er ordered to do so by the Governor of the Common- 
wealth. This may involve police duty in any part of the 
state. The force has performed strike duty in the follow- 
ing municipalities outside of the Boston metropolitan area, 
having been called upon by the local authorities and 
detailed to such duty by the Governor: Lawrence, Pitts- 
field, Hopedale, Milford, Plymouth, Gloucester and West- 
field; and within the district in Boston, Wakefield and 
Lverett. Working with the state police the force performed 
hurricane and Hood duty in all parts of the state and in 
the city of Haverhill in 1937. The department is equipped 
with every modern device for service on the water, inland 
or ocean. 

The department is the highest salaried of all departments 
in New England. A recent statute gives personnel two con- 
secutixe days off duty in each seven. Annual vacations range 
from one week to four weeks, depending upon the length 
of service and the sick time allowance is 15 days each year. 
The officers are under the state contributory requirement 
system with retireinent at half pay when retirement age 
is attained. Additional benefits accrue if an officer is in- 
capacitated in the line of duty. 

Department personnel is comprised of the superintendent 
(for many years a member of the International Association 
of Chiefs of Police), the deputy superintendent, 9 captains, 
15 lieutenants, 37 sergeants, and 310 patrolmen. The force 
operates from eight police divisions, seven of w-hich are in 
the Boston Metropolitan District. There are ten police sub- 
stations and one division at Ware in the western part of 
the slate where is located the immense Quabbin Reservoir, 
18 miles in length. 








PURSE-SNATCHER ON A "FISHING" EXPEDITION. 
Equipped with fishing-line and hook, thief will 
pass behind victims trailing the line until it snares 
the purse. Inattention and carelessness of the vic- 
tims account for the success of this operation. 



PIRSE- 
SNATCHERS 



THE RETURN of warm weather finds thousands of New- 
Yorkers indulging in a favorite city pastime of strolHng. 
sitting and sunning themselves in the parks. Mothers and 
children, husbands and wives, young couples will swell the 
population of the parks while the warm weather continues. 
Preying on their peaceful pursuits will be the purse-snatcher 
who can turn a walk in the park into a personal tragedy. 

The purse-snatcher finds his work made easier for him by the care- 
lessness of his victims. Women out airing the baby carr>- unnecessarily 
large sums of money with them ; men doiif their jackets, place them on 
the ground with their wallets exposed for easy picking ; couples engrossed 
in themselves shut out the world but not the purse-snatcher who is on 
the alert for just such a situation. 

Purse-snatchers can be roughly divided into two categories : the ama- 
teur and the professional. The amateur is characterized by "on-the-spur- 
of-the-moment" activity. The professional selects his victim after due 
consideration of all factors and even carries "tools" to assist him in 
his work. 

The amateur, however, is as much a menace as the professional. In 
many instances, the amateur becomes even more dangerous when, impelled 




THE PURSE-SNATCHER uses bushes and shrubbery 
as o convenient spot to watch his potential victims. 




PURSES LEFT CARELESSLY ON PARK BENCHES 

or the ground are easy marks for the purse- 

snatcher who can casually scoop them up. 




li\ fiar and uncertainty, he is liable to resort to violence- — a tactic the 
professional generally spurns prefcrrin},' to work by stcaltii and cunning 
under cover of darkness. 

Usually the amateurs are adolescent boys and .ijirls tending to travel 
in small K'<<iKs of three or four. Their niethfjd of operation is simple, 
i)ased on the "hit and run" theory. They approach their victim, generally 
ail older woman incapable of giving chase, grab her purse, give her a 
sharp shove and make ofif, to lose themselves in the park. Approach is 
made from the front or rear. If the victim offers any resistance, the 
young hoodlums are liable to inflict bodily injury with their lists. The 
whole operation, however, is over so quickly that the victim is generally 
laktii unawares and makes little resistance. 

Mothers with children are a favorite target of the amateur. When 
mother goes after her toddling youngster, it is comparatively simple to 
remove her purse from the carriage where she has carelessly left it. Fre- 
quently, the gang will create a diversion and go into action when the 
mother's attention has been diverted sufficiently. In instances like this, 
the loss may not be discovered for many hours after the theft has occurred. 
Proceeds of the purse are divided among the gang with a larger share 
going to the actual snatcher or to the leader. These groups of youngsters 
may engage in this activity just once. Their easy success, however, is an 
incentive to continue until their eventual apprehension. 

The "professional" works on a preconceived, contemplated plan, com- 
plete to burglar's tools. He prefers to work at night under the cover of 
darkness when his dark clothing affords him protective coloration. Neatly 
dressed, he is not conspicuous by reason of his appearance. This thief 
seats himself near an entrance to the park where he can observe couples 
as they enter. Choosing one that fits his requirements, he follows them 
until they get settled and waits for the propitious time to make the 
"snatch." He hides in shrubbery and then picks up the purse which the 
\ ictim has conveniently left on the grass or bench about a foot away. 

The thief then makes his way to a pre-selected site, generally not more 
than a few hundred feet from where the theft occurred. Hidden in a 
clump of bushes or sheltered by a group of large trees, the thief proceeds 
to loot the purse. For this purpose he carries with him a pencil-type flash- 
light over which he has fitted a rubber finger. This serves to diffuse the 
rays of light so that no attention is drawn to him and yel it provides suf- 
ficient light for the thief to systematically go through the contents. The 
pursr is then discarded since its possession would imply positive .guilt. 

.\ fishing-line and hook is another "burglar's tool" used by ]jurse- 
snatchers. In this instance, the thief will observe a w'oman whose purse 



PURSE-SNATCHERS, (right), fre- 
quently use "tools." Pencil-type 
flash-light is used for going 
through purses at night. Light is 
sufficient for search and does not 
throw beams which would dis- 
close purse-snatcher's position. 
Fishing-cord and hook are used 
to "hook" purses left on ground. 



A JACKET draped carelessly over a park bench 
is an open invitation to the purse-snatcher who 
approaches his engrossed victims from the rear. 




— 4- 



is lying on the grass near where she is seated. By passing back and forth 
behind her, the thief is able to hook the purse on the line and drag it 
away to a more secluded spot. One thief actually secreted himself in the 
branches of a tree and, using a hook and line, was able to pull in the purse 
of an unsuspecting victim. 

Most persons visiting the park at night sit near an entrance, feeling 
that the proximity to the street and the street lights afifords them some 
measure of protection. The purse-snatcher, however, finds this an excel- 
lent place for his activities for he can grab the purse, leap over the wall 
and escape into the city's traffic. 

Purse-snatchers working in pairs will frequently accost couples. The 
one in front diverts the attention of the couple while the one in back grabs 
for the purse. 

Purse-snatchers are of no particular age-group. Young girls from the 
ages of ten to sixteen are frequently found to be offenders. Men as 
old as sixty have been apprehended. 

Constant patrol on foot and by car by officers who are aware of the 
potential purse-snatcher does much to keep this type of larceny at a 
minimum. 

The officer assigned to a park should : 

• Warn persons seated on the lawn to keep purses and wallets in a safe 
place ; 

• Advise persons seated near bushes or trees of the possibility of purse- 
snatchers ; 

• Examine bushes or shrubbery for concealed persons who are loitering 
or feigning sleep ; 

• Keep under observation all persons who seem to be sauntering back 
and forth within a small area ; 

• Be suspicious of persons entering the park at night. 

It should be borne in mind that purse-snatching is not confined to park 
areas alone although they lend themselves most suitably to this type of 
activity. Shopping areas, markets, playgrounds and beaches are also the 
scene for these petty thieves. 

SPRING 3100 acknowledges with thanks the assistance of Patrolman 
Charles F. Sullivan, Jr., 22nd Precinct who suggested the article and 
helped in its preparation. Policewomen Eleanor Prager and Priscilla 
Wolfe and Patrolman Sullivan posed for the pictures. 



^^'.-^^-(.^^ 


^HH 


f^M 


pi 


^^^^^L,^ \ -J"*"^ 


l^^^K'"^ ^M 


^^^^Hb ~'^^^^/ 


M^Bl^^^l 


^HJ^Il: ^B ^Xt^'^^^'^^^^l 


^SiJB 







HAVING TAKEN A PURSE, 
(left), the thief hides in some 
near-by shrubbery which he has 
selected earlier and goes through 
the purse prior to discarding it. 
Purse-snatchers generally retain 
money only and will discard 
purse as quickly as possible, 
since its possession would be 
strong evidence against them. 




JUVENILES SOMETIMES ENGAGE IN PURSE- 
snatching using a hit-and-run method. Here, juve- 
nile approaches victim from rear, snatches purse 
and gives her a violent shove at the same time. 




IN APPROACHING VICTIM FROM THE FRONT, 
youthful purse-snatcher grabs victim's purse and 
then runs ofF in same direction. Surprise factor ac- 
counts for the frequent success of this maneuver. 



— 5 — 



m 



ho 
hat 
hen 
hy 



Press Credentials 



EACH year, more than 3,500 press 
cards of all types are distributed by 
the Police Department to representatives 
of news-gathering agencies. Originally 
meant to identify newspaper reporters 
only, today the term "press" has been ex- 
panded to include radio, television, 
newsreel, and news syndicates. De- 
spite the number and complexity of these 
agencies, the cards are limited in distribu- 
tion. Each application is screened thor- 
oughly by the Office of the Secretary of 
the Department working in conjunction 
with the Police Commissioner's Committee 
on Press Cards. This latter committee is 
composed of a cross section of press rep- 
resentatives who, because of their work- 
ing background, ore able to advise on 
the validity of an application. 

Control of the issuance of press cards 
is welcomed by news-gathering agencies 
as an aid in their work. As a result, at 
the scene of a public function, the move- 
ments of reporters and photographers 
are not impaired by the presence of 
many persons carrying press cards who 
have no legitimate right to them. 

Today, at large public functions such 
as a MacArthur's Day or an Eisenhower 
Day— events covered by every kind of 
news agency— their representatives are 
easily identifiable to police and other 
officials through the simple means of dis- 
playing a press card. It is a symbol to 
the police officer that the possessor of the 
card has been screened and authorized 
to collect news and as such has the privi- 
lege of crossing police and fire lines. 

Conversely, the cards serve to elimi- 
nate unauthorized persons from gather- 
ing information to which they are not 



entitled. By eliminating them from the 
scene it is easier for the authorized hold- 
ers to operate. In this way the Police 
Department is able to identify and co- 
operate with the press, the press is 
helped in its important job of gathering 
news, and the public is benefited by 
getting its news quickly and authenti- 
cally. 

Ever since February 1, 1947, the 
Police Department has been in charge 
of issuing cards of identification to the 
various news-gathering agencies. For 
some time prior to this date, the Mayor's 
Office had distributed the cards until the 
investigatory aspects of the job became 
too manifold for it to handle. More 
than fifty years ago, a metal shield was 
carried by the few reporters representing 
the metropolitan newspapers. As the 
number and kind of news agencies grew, 
the shield was displaced by a card is- 
sued every three months. Today cards 
of various types are distributed on an 
annual basis to accedited news agencies 
of all kinds. 

The public today expects to read or 
see or hear about a news event within 
hours after it has occurred. Televison 
and radio have made news reporting al- 
most simultaneous with the event. The 
police officer can be of assistance to the 
holder of a press card by recognizing 
the card immediately and allowing the 
holder such privileges as the card calls 
for. In the event that a vehicle display- 
ing a photographer's or newsreel camera 
vehicle identification card is observed 
improperly parked, the police officer 
should make a report through channels 
to the First Deputy Police Commissioner 



for his attention. Such cases are thor- 
oughly investigated both by this depart- 
ment and the Press Photographers's 
Association. Flagrant violators may suf- 
fer a revocation of privileges. 

HOW OBTAINED 

To secure identification cards, the 
agency interested applies by letter to the 
Secretary of the Department. The ap- 
plication is then investigated and recom- 
mendation is made to the First Deputy 
Police Commissioner. After his approval, 
the card is issued. To help in determin- 
ing the eligibility of applicants, the aid 
of the Police Commissioner's Committee 
on Press Cards may be enlisted. 

GENERAL CHARACTERISTICS 

The back of each card must be signed 
by the holder together with a description 
of his height, weight, eyes and hair. The 
signer agrees to assume all risks in the 
case of accident and the cord may not 
be used by any other person. It is to be 
surrendered immediately upon termina- 
tion of employment and in the event of 
its loss, the facts must be reported im- 
mediately to the Secretary of the 
Department. 

In the event that a person presents or 
displays a card which has expired or 
was issued to another person, or is being 
used for a purpose other than that for 
which the card was issued, the police 
officer is authorized to take up the card. 
He should secure the name and address 
of the person from whom he has token 
the card and make a report. Card and 
facts are then transmitted to the First 
Deputy Police Commissioner. 







KXPIRKS DKC. 31, 1952 


1 

1 


f'OLKt 
. :'DtPARTMlM 


PRtSS PHOIOr.RAPHERS VtHICU 










■|'M|s VI-HKJI III^MIIH \TI'iN fAMU It liSl f U TO 

PBKS'' 
rilllKMltlAPIII It 




■ MPLOYfO H\ __ 

»ttO itlAU Ml Hiktiiitii.. ViHf|.r ACTVaILV TAOaOKO is TAXIM. MMs 

pnuitntUAfns. io fAfk >>An> il.iilt:i-l at ou nkak fHi locaiiun ai 

wHk.li M en ptioiiMihAvm* xttt i« Bi. takln. 

CONDmONS und^ •■hKh llih PIUi^^ PmtTtKWAPMKtt'S VtlHICLE CAUO i» 
luttoJ and tlKn«turr wf bolder tvtil Im (oMnd on rcvenc ftWc. 



PRESS PHOTOGRAPHER'S VEHICLE CARD 

Size: 4" X 6" 
1952 color: blue 



PRESS PHOTOGRAPHER'S VEHICLE CARD 

TO WHOM ISSUED: Operators of press photographers' vehicles, who 
must also have possession of a Working Press Card bearing the same 
number. 

WHEN ISSUED: Cards ore issued on January 1 and expire on December 
31, a different color being used each year. Cards are numbered and must 
bear the signature of the Police Commissioner. 

Number issued during 1951: 210. 

HOW DISPLAYED: Cord shall be displayed on the windshield of the 
vehicle when parked where photographs are being made. 

CONDITIONS OF USE: Holder of card may park vehicle, while actually 
engaged in taking news photographs, o/ or near the location of the event. 
He may not pork the vehicle where it would be dangerous, obstruct traffic 
or interfere with the duties of any city department or public service cor- 
poration at the scene of on emergency. 



— 6 — 



POI.IC1-: MKPAR'rMKIStT 

Cmr OF NEW YOBK 

Working Press 

EXI'IIIKS OrXEMBEU 31, 1952 

2503 



mt BIARIR. 



KfPRfSEI 




Ttcft jro PASS PCfti(| 

UHES WHEREVER Fpi 

FIRE COMMISSIOXKR 



WORKING PRESS CARDS 

TO WHOM ISSUED: Representatives of recognized newspaper companies, news- 
gathering agencies, news picture agencies, newsreel companies, radio broadcasting 
companies and television companies. StafF reporters and photographers make up the 
bulk of this category. 

WHEN ISSUED: Cards are issued on January 1 and expire on December 31, a dif- 
ferent color being used each year. Cards are numbered and must bear the signature 
of the Police Commissioner and Fire Commissioner to be valid. 

Number issued during 1951: 2,373. 

HOW DISPLAYED: Upon entering police or fire lines, holder of card must display it 
in his hot band or on outer clothing. 

CONDITIONS OF USE: Holder of card is permitted within police or fire lines, excepf 
w/iere it would be dangerous to be admitfed therein, and he may take a camera with 
him for photographing the scene. Possession of card does not authorize access to 
buildings located within police and fire lines. 

WORKING PRESS CARD 

Size: 3%" X 2'/2" 
1952 color: blue 



^■•^ti^ 



"^ DEPARTMENT 



KXPIRES DKCEMBER 31. 1932 



NEWSRfEl CAM[R4 VfHJClE 



rilE OPEUATOR Of rti 



re^tfMK-n OHtDkeT *«ar 



SHALL SB PfiRMIT-TBn TO PAWi SAID V6Htta K AT THF SCkNK OF A NE«9 

KVfcNT WHILF ACTirALt.Y KNT.AQED IN TitflNti PICTUItE}. TMKHEOF. 

CONUITIONS uadcr Hhicb tkM Nawceel Cam it uiiMdiotll he btv^ t>a Kiana ud*. 



No. 95 



^Jt^r^^ Tw^fc y *' 



NEWSREEL CAMERA VEHICLE CARD 

Size: 4" X 6" 
1952 color: yellow 



NEWSREEL CAMERA VEHICLE CARD 

TO WHOM ISSUED: Operators of newsreel photographers' vehicles carry- 
ing sound and camera equipment. This category includes television 
camera men. 

WHEN ISSUED: Cards are issued on January 1 and expire on December 
31, a different color being used each year. Cards are numbered and must 
bear the signature of the Police Commissioner. 

Number issued during 1951: 93. 

HOW DISPLAYED: Card shall be displayed on the windshield of the 
vehicle when parked. 

CONDITIONS OF USE: Holder of card may park vehicle ot the scene of 
the news event while actually engaged in taking pictures. He may not park 
the vehicle where it would be dangerous, obstruct traffic or interfere with 
the duties of any city department or public service corporation at the scene 
of an emergency. Possession of a card does not permit vehicle to cross fire 
lines without authorization of the Fire Department officer in charge. 



POLICf 
DEPARTMEM 



IDENTIflCATION 

EXPIRES JUNE 30, 1952 



The bhahek_ 

IS EMPl.OYKn BY 



'Thi« police card it for identification parposet only and dnt\ 
not fluthor'f^e entrance within puIJce or fire tines, except iu tlic 
periorrutince ol emergency duly. 



No. 1600 



'-^^iXkHr-^-tAr/VV??***;^- ^.^^ 



IDENTIFICATION CARD 

Size: 2%" X 4" 

Color (expiring June 30, 1952): pink 



IDENTIFICATION CARD 

TO WHOM ISSUED: Employees connected with recognized newspaper 
companies, news-gathering agencies, news picture agencies, newsreel 
companies, radio broadcasting companies, television companies, whose 
ordinary duties do not bring them in constant contact with police and 
fire lines. 

WHEN ISSUED: Cards are issued on July 1 and expire on June 30, a 
different color being used each year. Cords are numbered and must 
bear the signature of the Police Commissioner. 

Number issued during 1951: 1,373. 

CONDITIONS OF USE: Card serves only as an identification for mem- 
bers of agencies listed above. Possession of card does not authorize 
holder to enter or remain within police or fire lines, except in the per- 
formance of emergency duty. 



/ 




^^<y 



The Old Forty-Niner 
Digs For The Story 



From: The Old Forty-Niner 

To: You 

Subject: STOCKHOLM (SWEDEN) POLICE 

Into SPRING 3100 's garret a short time back, strolled another story that the 
Old Forty-Niner thought you might like to hear about. This one came in the form 
of Borje Brannstrom, a detective-inspector of the Stockholm Police. He had 
been in the United States for several months studying police organization and 
methods in various American cities. 

Flattered to learn that he was familiar with our magazine, the Old Forty- 
Niner became engrossed in a very enlightening conversation with this pleasant 
visitor from across the seas. "How about telling us something about your own 
force back home?" the Old Forty-Niner asked. 

"Well, first of all," was the ready response, "our force is much smaller 
than yours. We have about 750,000 people in Stockholm and our police number only 
about 1,500. The force is headed by a chief constable and under him is the 
1,200-man uniformed constabulary and the 300-man Criminal Investigation Depart- 
ment. The city is divided into nine watch districts, which would correspond to 
your precincts. " 



"How about the policeman, himself?" queried the Old Forty-Niner. 
tell us something about his working conditions?" 



"Can you 



(Continued on page 26} 




Police officers throughout 
Sweden ottend the Na- 
tional Police School in 
Stockholm and wear iden- 
tical uniforms although 
they are under local con- 
trol. Shown left to right 
are an inspector, assistant 
inspector and constable 
of the Stockholm police. 
Their equivalent ranks in 
our deportment ore lieu- 
tenant, sergeant and pa- 
trolman, respectively. 



Inspector 



Assistant Inspector 



Constable 



— 8 — 



TOP COMMAND 



SKETCHES OF TOP-RANKING MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 



Harlem's busy 10th Division has been commanded for 
the past seventeen months by Inspector William Mc- 
Namara, a policeman with twenty-six years service behind 
hiir ^ native of the Murray Hill section of Manhattan, 

he attended Cathedral Grammar and 
High Schools and De La Salle In- 
stitute. ... A member of the track 
teams at those schools, he later be- 
came a member of the Police Depart- 
ment's track team. . . . His father is a 
retired captain of the New York City 
Fire Department. . . . Inspector Mc- 
Namara was employed in the postal 
I savings division of the Post Office 
Department before joining the force. 
William McNamoro . Most of his Career has been spent 

in the patrol branch of the department in various parts of 
the city, but he has also served in the Detective Division, 
Juvenile Aid Bureau and the Bureau of Operations. . . . 
Living in the Bronx, Inspector and Mrs. McNamara are 
the parents of two children. A daughter. Rose (Mrs. John 
Burns), also resides in the Bronx, while Francis, a son, 
who graduated from Fordham Prep and Lafa\'ette College, 
is now employed as a geologist by the Texas Oil Company 
in California. . . . Partial to golf, he is a member of the 
Honor Legion and the department line organizations. 




WEARER of a department medal for his part in a gun 
battle with stick-up men, Inspector John B. McGarty 
also holds an Honorable Mention, a Commendation and 
two Excellent Police Duty awards. . . . Now commanding 
I Brooklyn's 15th Division, he boasts 
thirty-four years of service. . . . 
Born in Greenwich Village, he at- 
tended St. Alphonsus School. . . . 
Employed previously by the Ameri- 
can Express Company, he joined the 
, department in 1918 after his World 
I War I army service. ... As a ser- 
geant in 1929, he was awarded the 
William McLain Freeman Medal for 
, killing one hold-up man and captur- 
John B. McGarty ing two Others after an exchange of 
shots. The officer accompanying him was killed in the 
affray. . . . The inspector and his wife, the former Jean 
Egan, have lived in Bay Ridge for the last twenty-seven 
years. . . . His main hobby is golf. He also likes baseball 
and, in spite of his geographical location, is a Giant fan. 
. . . Appointed in 1918, his police service has included duty 
with the detective and traffic branches as well as the patrol 
force. 




APPOINTED to the force in 1919, Inspector Edward G. 
McGlone, now commanding the 19th Division, has 
done police duty in all boroughs of the city. . . . Coming 
from Brooklyn's Fort Hamilton section, he went to school 
at P.S. 104 at 92nd Street and 5th 
Avenue, before going on to graduate 
from Erasmus Hall High School. . . . 
His father also was a New York Cit}- 
policeman. ... A veteran of Navy 
sen'ice in World War I, he was sta- 
tioned aboard the U.S.S. South Da- 
kota, which was engaged in troopship 
convoy duty. His enlistment extend- 
ed from 1914-19. . . . Married for 
twenty-five years, he and his wife, 
Edward G. McGlone Sally, live in the Park Slope section. 
. . . The youngest detective in the department in 1920, he 
was badly wounded and his partner was killed in a 1921 
gun battle. He served a total of twenty-one years as a 
detective. . . . I-"or four years, he captained the 28th Pre- 
cinct in Harlem. . . . tie has been awarded three Com- 
mendations and Excellent Police Duty citations. ... A 
member of the various line organizations, he also belongs to 
the Honor Legion, Police Post 460 of the American Legion, 
and the Holy Name Society. . . . On his off time, he has 
studied Psychology and Personnel Management at NYU. 





BORN in Stapleton, Staten Island, Inspector Thomas V. 
Boylan presently heads the 22nd Division in Queens. 
. . . His schooling included Immaculate Conception Paro- 
chial School. Public School 14 and Curtis High School, all 
located in Richmond. ... He moved 
to the Bronx as a youth after the 
death of his parents. . . . Before com- 
ing into the department, he was em- 
ployed as a machinist by the Staten 
Island Shipbuilding Company (now 
Bethlehem Steel). ... He has been 
married for twenty-five years. With 
his wife, Antoinette, and their daugh- 
ter, he makes his home in Elmhurst. 
. . . Daughter Dorothy Ann, 19, is a 
private secretary with the Union Car- 
l)ide and Carbon Corporation. Number 1 in her class when 
she graduated from Dominican Commercial High School 
in February 1951, she is a scholarship student at evening 
sessions of' St. John's University, studying for a Bachelor 
of Arts degree. . . . Having served in Harlem in all ranks 
except his present one. Inspector Boylan is a strong sup- 
porter of positive public relations on the part of police. He 
has addressed many civic groups and has given many show- 
ings of a private motion picture album of famous cham- 
pionship fights of the past to church and neighborhood 
organizations. . . . He numbers both Joe Louis and Sugar 
Ray Robinson among his personal friends. . . . Holding 
two Commendations, he is a Giant fan, and golfs in the 
high eighties. 



Thomas V. Boylan 



— 9 — 



"D Y virtue of the statutes in effect 
-'-' in the State of New York (Sec- 
tions 974 and 975 of the Penal Law), 
mere possession of a policy slip is a 
violation of law. Over the years, some 
of the more ingenious policy collectors 
have devised various means of avoid- 
ing the charge of "possession of a 
policy slip." Some have written their 
wagers and collections on a stick of 
chewing gum which, as the arresting 
officer approached, they attempted to 
chew. Others have developed a re- 
markable acumen for remembering 
huge lists of numbers, thereby avoid- 
ing the necessity of writing them. Still 
others have attempted difi'erent meth- 
ods of evading the law. In this latter 
group are ever-increasing numbers of 
policy collectors who employ codes of 
their own construction to record the 
numbers played and the amounts 
wagered. 

The New York City Police Depart- 
ment has been breaking gambling codes 
as a regular thing for about the last 
twelve years. Back in 1940, a Brooklyn 
detective kept a policy collector under 
observation for the greater part of the 
day. When he felt that the time was 
opportune, he made the arrest but to 
his surprise, the pad • on which the 
prisoner had been recording the bets 
did not contain the usual notations. It 
appeared to be the score of a musical 
composition (see illustration on 
page 12). 

The arresting officer got in touch 
with the department's Legal Bureau 
and explained how he had observed the 
prisoner writing policy wagers for 
several hours but that he could make 
neither head nor tail of the markings 
on the pads. The commanding ofificcr 
assigned Abraham P. Qiess, a civilian 
attorney of the bureau, to the case. 



This was not a chance assignment, 
because Abe Chess was well known to 
his associates as a dabbler in crypt- 
ology. Although it gave him some un- 
comfortable moments, he finally 
cracked the code. His testimony in court 
brought about a conviction that would 
have been otherwise impossible. 

The growth in the use of codes to 
frustrate the police is demonstrated by 
the fact that fifty-six were submitted 
to the Legal Bureau for deciphering in 
1951. This figure is an increase of 
twenty-nine over 1950 and maintains 
the trend of successive increases in 
every year since 1940. Other police 
departments in the Metropolitan Area 
have requested our assistance in break- 
ing codes. A recent case in Mount 
Vernon resulted in the conviction of 
one Anthony Guadagno who used what 
he thought was an "unbeatable" 
system. The various steps used to 
bring about Guadagno's downfall are 
presented in detail to illustrate the 
steps involved (see following page). 

Types of Codes 

The greatest (and almost sole) 
classification of codes employed by 
policy collectors is the so-called simple- 
substitution code. These codes are 
characterized as such by virtue of the 
fact that one symbol is substituted for 
one digit. An example of such a sim- 
ple-substitution code would be the let- 
ter A substituted for 1 ; the letter B 
substituted for 2; the letter C substi- 
tuted for 3 and so on, finally ending 
with the letter I substituted for 9 and 
the letter J substituted for 0. Employ- 
ing this code, the wager 351 50(J 
would be written CEA EJ or might 
be grouped together and written 
CEAEJ. 

The simple-substitution codes in- 



clude the type of code very frequently 
emploj-ed by retail shops in order to 
mark the wholesale price of merchan- 
dise upon the object itself so that the 
salesman will know what the store- 
keeper paid for it, without revealing 
this information to the purchaser. The 
word "Cumberland" is a key to such a 
code, as are many ten-letter words, or, 
ten-letter groups of two or more 
words, containing no duplication of 
letters. Employing the "Cumberland" 
code, the wager 731 25^ would be writ- 
ten Imc ue. 

Among the more elementary sinipk- 
substition codes is the so-called tic-tac- 
toe code. Its designation is derived 
from the fact that it is based ui)on the 
frame employed in the playing of tic- 
tac-toe ; viz. # . Various portions of 
this frame are used to represent the 
individual digits. Reading from left to 
right and from top to bottom, the 
digit 1 may be indicated by J ; the 
digit 2 by U ; the digit 3 by L ; 4 
by D ; 5 by D ; 6 l)y C ; 7 by 
-\ ; 8 by n ; 9 by r' ; an<l by 
- . Under this system the wager 
246 10^ would be written UDC J -. 

It must be apparent that almost any- 
thing could be substituted in lieu of a 
particular di.uit or number. Among the 
codes which have been deciphered and 
for which convictions have been ob- 
tained are those employing the writ- 
ing of musical notes upon a scale, the 
use of letters of the Greek alphabet, 
the use of Hebrew letters, the use of 
ancient Phoenician letters, codes based 
upon the Spanish or French language, 
codes employing Isaac Pitman short- 
hand symbols, and codes based upon 
characters or symbols created by the 
defendant himself and purely a fig- 
ment of his imagination. Of course, 

{Continued on page 12) 



10 — 



the code was broken 



g ^0 -J 



00^ f 










-// 
-III 



J - 
o fC 
lo 
J 
K- 
.1 J 
HJX' -(( 
A-/ M. 
o ?. ' t 

Old •' 
0/2-/' 

pK* -I 
(v-/ -III 






|j D - m 

SA-/ -II 

•il -I 
i/n t - III/ 



,»£f ^«rf 






.».f »«' 
'II 
./( 
-Ill 

-W-IN 

-«l 



<S-l 



\\) 0-1 

Sr, -III 
\!^ -il 
\ J Id-* II 

\i- 
\ie>-i 



J •"mimiiniit-ii«»i»M(>f 
n • mvnm 

,< .llM«llil||( 

it »T«H 

. »lHli*Ell 

•t ■ 



7 : .<V>w-t'^»*(a-u#^ 

p' - o 
^ - 3 

- s' 

J : V 

J - I 






viS.' 



# 



ti "^^ 



•' ('=-'.■ [i^"'"^'-^-^ 






Pages from larger notebook found in the possession of 
Anthony Guadagno, arrested as a policy collector in 
Mount Vernon, N. Y. (Right) Work sheets used by the 



Legal Bureau to establish the frequency with which the 

various characters appeared. The results were checked 

against established Tables of Frequency. 




^a- 






rrxj 



S^ 






^1 



II 



i4 



■fj 



r V 



33 



7 I 3 I (.\ lcY^-i)\ il\ fl| (i-i) 



a/ 



■f^ 



i? 



JJl) 



5 ^ :2i, ,a-^y,.JUf 



'.»^^^_ .^t^iS^aA^ —-^'GZea^t, ^^O 






XT 



J^lwa^ 












Key to Code. 
(Left) Informa- 
tion from work 
sheets is sum- 
marized in con- 
venient form 
and expert's 
conclusions are 
included at the 
bottom of sheet. 



Code Deci- 
phered. (Right) 
The "numbers" 
written in code 
on the two note- 
book pages 
shown in the 
upper left illus- 
tration, are re- 
written in the 
form in which 
they would be 
customarily 
found. 



1113 



FiRZT PAGE 

_ ^yj' lo 

g/3 >' 



JajLL 



■ lil, 3 



yj/3 

in io 

_iifu> 

iiif 
lilS 
J//S1' 

(.■19S' 

iiS-lO 



It! 

■ill 

3/* 

■lii. 



aj/_r_ 

lie lO 
ns.U), 

IM 10 

JH «~-*3£> 

art o_<^}» 

not 'V 
tji) c~t >» 

SE(fON0 p/>ge 






— 11 








a^^a^^cgi^fca^^ig^ ' ji^'jfe^ 



^i A\m\\^ ^ A^^jm 



j i P'' :", ^irn=?rg 



^^^^^^mtf.- 



The first code case assigned to the Legal Bureau consisted of a series of sheets similar 
to the above. Not only were different musical notes used but their positions on the scale 
changed their values. The ingenuity of the policy collector was defeated when his 
symbols were identified as follows: 





1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


NOTE 
Position 


e 
bottom 


f 

bottom 


g 

second 


a 

second 


b 

third 




line 


spoce 


line 












from 


from 


from 


Kole 






bottom 


bottom 


bottom 




6 


7 


8 


9 





NOTE 
Position 


c 
third 
spoce 


d 

fourth 

line 


e 
fourth 
spoce 


f 
lop 
line 


9 

space 
over 
Koie 




from 


from 


from 






bottom 


bottom 


bottom 







Each measure, indicated by the straight line, constitutes a separate wager. The musical 
repeat sign (two dots at the end of a measure) indicates a combination play. 



(Continued from poge 10) 

none of these codes made any sense in 
Greek, Hebrew, Phoenician, Spanish, 
French, shorthand or music, but made 
good sense when translated into the 
numbers which they actually repre- 
sented. 

More advanced than the simple-sub- 
stitution code is the complex-substitu- 
tion code. This type of cipher uses a 
combination of more than one charac- 
ter or symbol to represent a single 
digit. An example of this kind of code 



is the substitution of abb for 1 ; bab 
for 2 ; bba for 3 ; aab for 4 ; aba for 
5 ; baa for 6 ; aaa for 7 ; bbb for 8 ; 
bcc for 9; and ccb for 0. Employing 
this code, the wager 241 50<} would be 
written babaababbabaccb. 

Another example of this type in- 
volving a code which was deciphered 
by the Legal Bureau, employed the 
letters yun for 1 ; dey for 2 ; twa for 
3 ; kat for 4 ; sink for 5 ; sis for 6 ; set 
for 7 ; uit for 8 ; neff for 9 ; and for 0. 
The wager 541 20^ would be written 



sinkkatyundeyo. A close examination 
of this code will reveal that, although 
it is not written in I'rench, it is based 
upon the phonetic sound of the num- 
bers as they are pronounced in the 
French language but spelled out ac- 
cording to the phonetic sound of the 
letters as they are employed in the 
English language. The defendant, 
being a French West African, of 
course pronounced his French accord- 
ing to the dialect spoken in that area 
of the globe. 

Steps Involved 

More advanced types of codes are 
not generally employed in the playing 
of policy. Occasionally, however, rare 
instances produce codes of a more 
complicated nature. Given enough ma- 
terial and enough time, these too have 
been deciphered. The field of decipher- 
ing policv codes and the methods em- 
ployed hv policy collectors have been 
developed to the point where the Legal 
Bureau now has a very valuable 
adjunct — The Chess Tables of Fre- 
quency for Policy Games, named after 
its compiler. When deciphering a 
code, the counting of the frequency 
with which each symbol is used and its 
comparison with these tables will re- 
veal many possibilities which are ex- 
tremely helpful. In deciphering a 
policy code, the steps include, among 
others : 

1. Determining what groupings are 
used. 

2. Determining what basic symbols 
are employed. 

3. Determining which symbols are 
used to indicate numbers. 

4. Checking frequency of occurrence 
of symbols used to indicate num- 
bers played and those used for 
amounts wagered. 

5. Checking three-way and six-way 
combination plays and the amounts 
wagered on them. A three-way 
play consists of a selection of num- 
bers which only permit of re-ar- 
rangement in three possible com- 
binations; OS for example, 414 
could also be re-arranged to read 



12 — 



\.^ 



. 1 



I 



I 



/■ 



_ — — * I ■ - 

__ \ ^ - .. 

lx:^-. l.U v., V ->•» • 



// 



-^/'-. .^' 



What appears to be shorthand notes 
(above) brought about the conviction of 
a policy collector. Despite the fact that 
many of the symbols were identical ex- 
cept for a difference in shading, the Legal 
Bureau's expert identified them as follows: 

1234567890 
\ \ - - - - I I / / 

The amounts wagered were identified as: 
5 10 15 20 25 
V • X N 

A combination play was indicated by / . 



441 and 144. The players feel that 
the numbers ore lucky and bet on 
all of their possible arrangements. 
A six-way play results from three 
numbers, each of which is different, 
as for example, 234. There are six 
possible combinations of these three 
digits. 

6. Checking groupings of symbols 
used for amounts wagered and 
their frequency. 

Pointers for Plainclothesmen 

There are certain rules which should 
be followed by a plainclothesman 
effecting an arrest in a case wherein it 
is suspected that a policy code is being 
used. Primarily, the most important 
thing to do it to obtain as much of the 






If the policy collector arrested with the above sheet in his possession had the same 
symbols imprinted on a clay tablet, they might have been confused with the oldest 
writing known— the Sumerian Cuneiform. But since he used pencil and paper, the 
symbols were decoded into: 

1234567890 

Alternate symbols were also used for the numbers one to four whenever confusion might 
result in the writing of certain combinations. The alternates were: 

12 3 4 

- II III nil 

Thus, the second bet on the next to the last line (433) was written =111 = 
Instead of = = s . 

The amounts wagered were Identified as: 

5 10 20 50 

r\ X i f 

A combination play was Indicated by encircling the amount of the bet. 



writing as possible. Let the suspect 
write his wagers all day, if need be. 
If in connection with the arrest an ex- 
amination of the vicinity reveals addi- 
tional writings in the same code, take 
them along. The importance of obtain- 
ing as much of this writing as possible 
cannot be over-stressed. No standards 
concerning the quantity of material 
necessary or the amount of time re- 
quired can be established. What may 
be more than sufficient in material and 
time in respect to one code, may not 
be enough to decipher another. 

If the passage of a specific sum of 
money to the defendant can be seen, 
especially in connection with the last 
transaction which has been recorded 
in code, it will be of assistance in 
helping to decipher all of the writings. 

Ascertain particularly the languages 
and skills with which defendant is 
familiar, (such as stenography, typing, 



printing, piano playing, etc.) These 
may prove to be the basis for the code 
employed by him, and knowledge of 
this fact may be helpful in the work of 
decipherment. 

Deliver the code material for de- 
ciphering to the Legal Bureau, Police 
Headquarters, as soon as possible, to- 
gether with the information indicated 
above, as well as the following data : 

1. Defendant's full name. 

2. Arresting officer's full name, rank 
and command. 

3. Court in which case will be tried. 

4. Date set for trial. 

If the policy collector's code suc- 
ceeds in stumping our experts, then 
his intelligence and ability could defi- 
nitely be employed to far greater ad- 
vantage in a legitimate enterprise. 



n 




Sgt. Paul Brooks 

Deceased 



THE responsibility for the death of Sergeant Paul Brooks 
and the serious injury on February 28 of Patrolman 
Bernard Daley, Grand Central Parkway Precinct, rests with 
a speeding motorist who is still unknown. Patrolman Daley, 
on motorcycle duty, gave chase when he clocked the speeder 
on the parkway. His wheel hit a depression, causing him 
to be thrown from his machine. Daley was removed to 
St. John's Hospital in Queens in a serious condition. 

Sergeant Brooks hurried to the hospital to check on the 
condition of Daley and to ascertain such facts as might be 
necessary for continuing the investigation of the unknown 
speeder. On his way back to the precinct, the sergeant's 
motorcycle was struck by an oil truck. The sergeant was 
brought back to St. John's Hospital where he died of his 
injuries. 

Sergeant Brooks entered the department on March 26, 
1938 and was promoted on July 16, 1946. Interment was 
on March 3 at Pinelawn Cemetery, Farmingdale, L. I. 




Ptl. Bernard Daley 



p.^TROLMAN WlLLI.\M KENNEDY, 

-*■ 10th Precinct, was shot and 
severely wounded by a man who was 
being admitted for psychiatric observa- 
tion at Bellevue Hospital on February 
6. Two other policemen were also in- 
jured by the crazed man. It all started 
when the patient's family requested 
police assistance after the man became 
violent at home. It took the combined 
efforts of Patrolmen Kennedy, Mi- 
chael Bonura, John Mallon and Robert 
Vopelak, 10th Precinct, to subdue the 
man so that he could be transported 
to the hospital. Just before the am- 
bulance arrived, the patient subsided 
and seemed to become tractable in his 
behavior, but being apprehensive of his 
conduct while being transported, the 
four police officers accompanied the 
ambulance to the hospital. 

The patient's peaceful behavior came 
to an end suddenly while he was being 
examined by the admitting physician. 
Bursting into a maniacal rage, he 
picked up a chair and struck Mallon 
with it. When Mallon fell uncon- 
scious, the enraged man grabbed the 
ofificer's gun and started to shoot. The 
first shot grazed Eonura's neck; the 
second, seriously wounded Kennedy. 
Vopelak, who succeeded in reaching 
the madman, was hit by two bullets 
both of which, miraculously, did no 



damage. The first one hit his shield 
and glanced off. The second one 
ripped the back of his uniform. Vope- 
lak succeeded in subduing the patient 
who was immediately put under re- 
straint by hospital attendants. All the 
police officers except Kennedy were 
able to leave the hospital. 



THE New York Foundlin<!: Hospital 
which shelters infants of all races 
and creeds, unwittingly provided 
refuge for seventy-five pigeons which 
had been stolen by seven youngsters, 
ranging in ages from ten to thirteen. 
The seven bird-fanciers stole the 
pigeons on January- 31 from a coop 
maintained by the owner on a roof 
top on East 116th Street. The chil- 
dren then looked around for a safe 
place to hide the birds and selected 
an abandoned air-shaft in the base- 
ment of the New York Foundling 
Home on East 68th Street. There 
they fed them carefully twice a day 
since their ultimate aim was to raise 
them for sale. On the night of Feb- 
ruary 4, one of the group returned 
to the roof top to augment their 
stock. This time the wary owner was 
waiting for him and held him imtil 
Detective Al Marino of the 25th 
Squad arrived. Quizzed by Marino, 



the hoy broke down and confessed 
the whole scheme. All the rest of the 
gang were rounded up and arraigned 
in Children's Court. 



\ DOPE addict in need of a "shot" 
■^ and a near-sighted teen-ager 
couldn't "see" their way out of a hold- 
up they committed in Queens on Feb- 
ruary 7. They were nabbed by Patrol- 
men .\rnold Pine and Gerard Carey, 
104th Precinct. The two men entered 
an optometrist's shop in Queens 
and requested an examination. The 
optometrist had hardly begun when a 
gun was pulled and the holdup took 
place. The optometrist was locked 
into a closet. A few minutes later and 
a ftw blocks away, a florist in his 
greenhouse was surprised to see two 
men jump into his parked truck and 
drive away. 

Tie ran out and flagged down Patrol- 
men Pine and Carey on RMP duty. 
With the florist in the car, the team 
set out to find the stolen truck. Spotting 
it, they forced it to the curb and 
both men surrendered. A loaded gim 
was found on one of the men. .^t the 
station house, the optometrist who had 
come to report the robberv' identified 
the duo as the men who had held him 
up. One of the robbers stated that he 



— 14 — 



was a drug addict and had engaged in 
the holdup to secure funds for more 

drugs. 

* * * 

PATROLMEN Martin Mullin and 
and Henry Dankenbrink, 110th 
Precinct, stopped two young men 
for NOT loitering. The men were 
walking too fast and on a hunch the 
officers questioned them. Their 
hunch paid off. The two men were 
carrying a gun and were making a 
fast exit from a burglary in a liquor 
store in Queens. They had also stolen 
an automobile whose owner had left 
the motor running. 



TTTHiLE waiting for a prescription 
^^ to be filled at a drug-store in Ja- 
maica, Detective Abraham Rosenberg, 
73rd Squad, struck up a conversation 
with another customer who was a cash- 
register salesman. The salesman com- 
plained that his business had fallen off 
because some new competitor had sud- 
denly appeared in his territory and 
was undercutting his prices. The sales- 
man couldn't understand how the cash- 



registers could be sold at such low 
prices. Detective Rosenberg thought 
that he had the solution. 

Six cash registers had been stolen a 
few days previously from a Brooklyn 
grocery store and it was possible that 
the thieves were now peddling the 
registers to storekeepers in Queens. 
Rosenberg interviewed storekeepers 
who had been solicited by the new 
competitor. From the description and 
clues they offered, Rosenberg and his 
partner, Detective Henry Warner were 
able to pick up a truck driver and a 
bookmaker who answered the descrip- 
tion. Some of the cash registers were 
found in the basement of the book- 
maker's home. 

"D ADio Motor Patrolmen Robert 
■^*- Muh and James Geoghegan, 7th 
Precinct, picked up an alarm for a 
"hit-and-run" driver at 11:06 A.M. 
on February 24. Within four minu- 
tes, they spotted their quarry in a 
green sedan at Henry and Grand 
Streets, and apprehended him. The 
driver had mounted the curb at 12th 
Street and Third Avenue and then 



sped away after hitting a pedestrian. 
Patrolmen Muh and Geoghegan 
charged the operator with driving 
without a license, driving while in- 
toxicated and leaving the scene of 
an accident. 



Two radio patrolmen who last 
month broke up a gang of gold 
smugglers, repeated last February 7 
with another good arrest when they 
solved a burglary within a few min- 
utes after arriving on the scene. Patrol- 
men Joseph P. Lynch and Henry M. 
Cronin, 26th Precinct, responded to a 
radio call that a burglary had been 
committed in an apartment at 315 West 
94th Street. While talking with the 
victim, the radio team heard suspicious 
noises coming from an adjoining 
apartment. They investigated and 
found the occupant dressing for a get 
away. His wardrobe consisted of 
clothing which was identified as hav- 
ing been stolen from the complainant's 
apartment. The man admitted having 
taken the clothing and was booked on 
charges of burglary and grand larceny. 



FRIENDS IN NEED 




Neivs Photo 

PATROLAAAN CHARLES NOVELLO, 13th Precinct (left), as- 
sumes the care and feeding of three children whose mother 
abandoned them. PATROLMAN JOSEPH HARTTER, E.S.S. 19 



L. 1. F. fnolo 

(right), comes to the aid of a girl who found herself impaled 

on fence when she accidentally skated into it. Patrolman 
Hartter is shearing off part of the fence to release the finger. 



— 15 — 



ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK 

(Conlinuedt 

THE whole country is still talking 
about the undramatic but none- 
theless sensational arrest on February 
18 of Willie Sutton by Patrolmen 
Joseph McClellan and Donald Shea, 
78tli Precinct, aided by Detective 
Louis Weiner. Sutton who success- 
fully evaded the FBI and the police 
for nearly five years was apprehended 
at a Brooklyn gas station by the 
police officers after a young man 
recognized Sutton and called the of- 
ficers' attention to him. The civilian 
had spotted Sutton in a subway and 
followed him until he stopped at a 
gas station. McClellan and Shea 
drove by just then and the man told 
them of his suspicions. 

The officers hastened to the gas 
station and questioned Sutton who 
denied being the most wanted crimi- 
nal in the country and proffered what 
appeared to be satisfactory docu- 
mentary evidence of his identifica- 
tion. Pretending to be satisfied with 
the evidence, the police officers with- 
drew temporarily. While one kept 
Sutton under discreet surveillance, 
the other hastened to the 78th Pre- 
cinct, a few blocks away and enlisted 
the aid of Detective Weiner and a 
copy of SPRING 3100's wanted page. 

Hurrying back, they found Sutton 



still negotiating for a battery repair 
job and brought him into the station 
house for <juestioning. Here, be ad- 
mitted bis identity. For their part 
in the biggest arrest of the year, both 
patrolmen were raised in rank to first 
grade detectives. Detective Weiner 
was advanced to second grade for his 
good work. 



As an aftermath of the arrest of 
Willie Sutton, Lieutenant Wil- 
liam Dunn and Detectives Victor 
Shanley Jr. and Thomas Walsh, 78th 
Squad were able to eff"ect the arrest 
of Sutton's partner, Thomas Kling, 
within two days after Sutton's arrest. 
Kling, who was also one of the na- 
tion's ten most wanted criminals, was 
captured in a house at 308 East 18th 
Street, Manhattan, after intensive in- 
vestigation by the officers mentioned. 
Another gang member, John De- 
Venuta, was also picked up. Sutton's 
ring of robbers and incipient plans 
for another robbery were smashed 
bv the arrests. 



\ POPULAR comic strip character in 
■^ the Daily News aided Detectives 
Roy Nunes, Robert Stratford and 



Larry Squires, 41st Squad, in estab- 
lishing the identity of a fourteen-year- 
old girl who was suffering from tempo- 
rary amnesia brought on after she 
crashed into a lamppost while roller 
skating on February 12. At the sta- 
tion house, the girl could not recall her 
name but mentioned that she thought 
it sounded similar to the name of a 
comic strip character. 

All the daily papers were corralled 
and the detectives settled down to 
reading the comic strips to the amnesia 
victim. Recognition came when the 
character of Dick Tracy was reached. 
The young girl said that that was her 
name but that she spelled it Tracey. 
The detectives called all the Traceys 
in the phone book and finally reached 
Veronica's parents who were just 
about to report her absence to the de- 
partment. 



FAST - ACTING Patrolmen Henry 
Franklin, Henry Kelly and 
Thomas Foley of the 17th Precinct 
snatched a would-be suicide from 
death. The woman sat on the ledge of 
a thirteenth floor window, clad only 
in a negligee and robe, and threatened 
to jump. All three police officers got 
to the apartment at the same time. 



END OF THE TRIAL 




XCU'S i'llut.' 

WILLIE SUTTON, the nation's most wanted criminal, is booked 
at the 78th Precinct by Detectives Joseph McClellan, left, 
and Louis Weiner, right. A few days later, Detective Victor 



\cws Hhoto 

Shanley, Jr., left, and Thomas Walsh, right, also of the 78th 

Squad, captured Sutton's side-kick, Thomas Kling, center, in a 

Manhattan rooming-house. 



16- 



Wasting few words, the officers went 
into immediate action by grabbing her 
and pulling her back into the apart- 
ment. She was removed to Bellevue 
Hospital for observation. 



ON February 4, Inspector Joseph J. 
D'Azevedo, acting chief of staff, 
was riding with Patrolman Harold 
Doidge, when they apprehended a 
robber who was fleeing from a hold- 
up at 21st Street and 7th Avenue. The 
officers heard shouts of "Stop thief !" 
and saw a man, who was running down 
Seventh Avenue, turn into 22nd Street. 
They sped after the fleeing man, pulled 
ahead of him and then stopped. Emerg- 
ing from the car with drawn revolvers, 
they ordered him to surrender. In- 
stead he made a move to draw a gun 
but was quickly disarmed by the in- 
spector and placed under arrest. The 
robber who had held up a liquor store 
and taken $38 from the proprietor, 
said he needed the money to pay his 
tuition for courses in X-ray technique. 
However, he later admitted that the 
proceeds of this and other robberies 
for which he was identified were to 
purchase narcotics. 



DETECTIVES James Murphy, Nathan 
Kreiger, Eugene Nonnon and 
John Kelly, 43rd Squad, won promo- 
tions in rank for their skillful solu- 
tion of the knife-slaying of two 
women which the killer had tried to 
make appear a death duel. On Feb- 
ruary 3, the bodies of the two women 
were found stabbed to death in a 
Bronx apartment. All evidence 
seemed to point to the fact that a 
furious battle had taken place be- 
tween the two women who had killed 
each other. Found near the bodies 
were two switch-blades placed in such 
a position that made the situation 
feasible. 

A painstaking examination dis- 
closed blood stains on the outer door 
of the apartment — stains that couldn't 
have been there had it been a case 
of mutual homicide. With this slim 
clue, the detectives widened their in- 
vestigation and scooped up the man 
who had committed the double mur- 
der in a fit of rage. The murderer 
had carefully arranged the scene to 
throw off any possible thought of 
murder by an outsider. The careful 
investigation of the detectives led to 
his downfall. 

— 17 — 




fTf 




Xcws Photo 

ALL TRAFFIC WAS DIVERTED and pedestrians warned off when a bomb was found on 

the street at 10th Street and Avenue C on February 5. Bomb has been placed in oil as 

safety precaution in container specially designed for this purpose. Later it was removed 

by Bomb Squad and rendered harmless. 




m 






A MANHATTAN LOFT BUILDING provided the setting for a floating crap game, raided 
on February 5 by the Police Commissioner's Investigating Unit under Supervising 
Assistant Chief Inspector James R. Kennedy. Carpeted enclosure (in right foreground) 

was the playing area. 

WHEN FORDHAM HOSPITAL was plunged into darkness on the night of February 8 

because of a generator failure. Emergency Service men helped by setting up portable 

lights for doctor's use in emergency room. 

Mirror Photo 




Xvi^ 




The Folic 



TX its short but crowded history, the I'ohcc Department 
-*■ has been called on to perform many duties not strictly 
related to policing the streets. At one time, the department 
was charged with the job of rounding up the goats which 
roamed in the wilderness around Columbus Circle. For 
a while, the department was responsible for cleaning the 
streets of New York. 

Under a law passed in 1867, the police were allocated the 
responsibility of providing shelter for all homeless persons 
in the city. This duty was continued until 1896 when the 
combined eflforts of an energetic police commissioner and 
a reform-minded police reporter led to its abolishment. 

New York City in 1867 was a city of extremes. Its popu- 
lation was either very wealthy or very poor. The rich were 
beginning to build their mansions on Fifth Avenue around 
Fortieth Street to get away from the crowds. The nouveau 
riche, whose fortunes had been made from California gold, 
were called "Fifth Avenue Noodles" and displayed their 
wealth ostentatiously and vulgarly. 

A wave of immigration, temporarily halted by the Civil 
War, had begun again and thousands of immigrants 
arrived annually at Ellis Island to be sucked into the poverty 
of the city's slums. 

The slums included the Five Points, known as the 
"toughest street corner in the world." The "Dead Rabbits" 
and the "Bowery Boys" were two gangs that ruled the 
slums and exacted tribute from the rest of the city through 
terrorism and violence. 

The year 1867 was marked by a tremendous religious 
growth among the respectable people of the city. About 
this time, the site of St. Patrick's Cathedral was selected 
in an area that was considered suburban. Yet in the same 
year, Bishop Simpson of the Methodist Episcopal Church 
was so appalled by the iniquities of the city that he told 
an audience that there were as many public prostitutes in 

"They began to give, these grim walls, when typhus fever 
broke out in the city in the winter of 1891-92. . . . Within 
eleven months the typhus broke out there. The night after the 
news had come, I took my camera and flashlight and made the 
rounds . . . photographing them all with their crov/d." 

From the "Moking of An American" by Jocob Riis. 

— 18 — 



". . . Elizabeth Street is one of the 
newer pattern and accorded one of the 
best. Certainly, the doorman seems to 
make an effort to clean it out, but broom 
and hose do not prevail against such an 
Aegean stable as the tramp lodgers 
leave behind. . . . On December 5, the 
number that slept in the space big 
enough for fen women was forty-eight." 

From on interview with Jacob A. Riis published 
«— in the World, February 12, 1893. 

New York as there were Methodists and this figure he set 
at twenty thousand. Police Superintendent Thomas Ken- 
nedy ordered a census taken by the police and reported 
that there were only 621 houses of prostitution, ninety-nine 
houses of assignation and 3,300 prostitutes. 

In the midst of these extremes, the poor but respectable 
citizen found it difficult to make a place for himself. It was 
for these poor that the city passed a law to provide free 
lodging. The Police Department was given the job of 
caring for the "lodger." 

Shelter was provided in the basements of police stations. 
There were no toilet facilities, no food and no supervision. 
There weren't even any beds and the lodgers slept on the 
floor huddled about a pot-bellied stove when one was 
available. Within a few years, the element for which the 
lodging was intended was driven out, as cheap hoodlums. 




Lodgers 



"Last year, . . . they (the police lodg- 
ing houses) furnished altogether 147,637 
lodgings and nearly twice as many dur- 
ing the winter months when there was no 
chance of ventilation as in the summer. 
On a certain cold night last week, ... a 
dozen shabby men snored among the 
lumber wherever they could find room, 
flat on the wooden floor, with their feet 
toward the stove. As many women sat or 
lay about in the room across the hall." 

From on ortlcle by Jacob Riis in the New York 
Tribune, January 31, 1892. 




vagrants and petty criminals took advantage of the free 
lodging offered by the city. 

The failure of the movement became apparent very 
quickly although it was very popular with the lodgers who 
flocked to police station houses. For many years, recom- 
mendations were made by police chiefs and police surgeons 
for the removal of lodgers from station houses. In 1885 
more than 134,000 persons were lodged. By 1890, twenty 
station houses were playing host to 150,000 lodgers a year. 
Police surgeons noted the unsanitary conditions surround- 
ing the lodgers and urged their removal for fear that they 
would spread their dirt and disease to the police officers 
quartered in the house. In 1892, when 137,436 lodgers were 
given police shelter, a typhus epidemic broke out in the 
city and was traced to its incubation in a police lodging. 

Police captains pointed out that respectable persons would 




not sleep in station houses out of fear for the tough 
element. The department further pointed out that the law 
did not provide powers of supervision or screening of the 
"lodgers" so that they were powerless to keep the criminal 
element out. There was, however, no other city agency 
designated to care for the homeless, and failing that, the 
department was burdened with a task for which it was not 
equipped by law or inclination to handle. 

It fell to the crusading spirit of a newspaper reporter 
covering police news and to the dynamic personality of a 
police commissioner to abolish the police lodging houses 
and turn them over to the Board of Charities where they 
rightly belonged. The police reporter was Jacob A. Riis, 
who was to go down in history as the good Samaritan of the 
times. He had emigrated from Denmark in 1870. Desper- 
ately poor, he had spent some nights in a police lodging 
and had been appalled by the conditions he found there. 
When he became a police reporter for the Sun, he embarked 
upon a career of social reform which led to many sweep- 
ing changes in the city. Out of his own personal experiences, 
he made the police lodgings one of his major targets, a 
campaign which had the support of the police administra- 
tion. 

In his famous book, "The Making of An American," 
Jacob Riis described his re-visit to a police lodging-house 
in 1896. "Down the cellar-steps to the men's lodging-room 
I led the President of the Police Board, Theodore Roose- 
velt. It was unchanged — just at it was the day I slept there. 
Three men lay stretched full length on the dirt\- planks. . . . 
Standing there, I told Mr. Roosevelt my own stor)'. He 
turned alternately red and white with anger. Orders' were 
issued to close the doors of the police lodging rooms on 
February 15. 1896. The battle was won." 

The Police Department's Annual Report of that year 
had the following to say: (Police lodging) was originally 

(Continued on page 23) 

Commercial accommodations for the poor were not much better 
than those provided by the city. This is a view, taken by Jacob 
Riis, of Happy Jack's Canvas Palace in Pell Street where for 
seven cents, the lodger slept on a strip of canvas. Picture taken 
about 1887. 

— 19 — 



JOE Nicco tucked his bleached face deeper into the collar 
of his ill-fittinti overcoat. He wished now that he had 
worn a hat. His dose-cropped, graying hair was small 
protection against the bitter March winds. Disgustedly he 
headed for tlu- ".Mirage," a tifteenlh carbon copy of a bar 
and grill, in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge. His parole 
be hanged. Some of the old gang would still be around, and 
he needed money. Maybe they'd have something in mind 

The bar was crowded, stale and noisy. Not bad for a 
Thursdav night. Slim must be doing good. The barkeep, 
an alert individual, eyed Nicco suspiciously before a gleam 
of recognition beamed in his eyes. His thick lips curled 
in welcome. Then he nodded slightly towards the back room. 

Picking his wav past a legless character, Nicco reached 
the famiiiar rear door. Knocking twice, he gained admit- 
tance. Through the maze of blue smoke, Nicco recognized 
Happy Gleason and Bugs Toomey. The other card players 
were new to him — young punks who were already stranger- 
shy. 

"Nicco," yelled Happy and Bugs, shoving themselves up 
from the table and pushing past chairs. They shook hands 
lustilv. "Count us out." Happy called to no one in par- 
ticular. Escorting Joe to a darkened corner with some de- 
gree of privacy, Happy asked, "Whencha get out?" 

"Yesterday." 

"Time oflf must be good these days." 

"If you stay out of trouble." 

Bugs interrupted. "Been up to see Millie yet?" 

"Yeah." snarleil \icco, "she don't want no more to do 
with me." 

"So," said Happy, his watery eyes interested. 

"So, there's more fish in the sea." 

Bugs laughed fondly. "That's our boy. Hey, Happy, 
let's make Joe our thoi'd man. Like the old days. Whatcha 
say, huh, Happy?" 

"Shut up," Happy snapped. "The screws get to you at 
all. Nicco? You still got no religion?" 

"Would I be here? Things ain't changed since you were 
there. Screws are screws. Them screws tell me I'm a recidi- 
vist," Nicco said, proud of his new vocabular)-. 

"Sounds like a disease," Bugs commented stupidly. 

"Nah, it means, I'm a repeater. A guy who won't stay 
out of the can because he can't break his old habits." 

"Skip it," Happy barked. "You don't wanta talk about 
things like that. You .got a future." 

"Such as . . ." 

"Come on outside." 

Outside the wind picked at Joe's ears. Happy led the way 
to a snappy-looking convertible. "Let's get out of the cold." 

"Yeah." Bugs chortled, sliding behind the wheel, "Let's 
take a ride. You like the car, Nicco?" he asked anxiously. 

"It's the money. Bugs. You guys must be doin' royal." 

"We will after tonight," Happy said meaningfully. 

"Whatcha got?" 

"It'll keep. Wait'U Bugs here gets to roUin' ; tlun with the 
heater on, we can talk comfortablelike." 

Crossing the Williamsburg Bridge with the Navy Yard 
a blaze of light below, Nicco said impatiently: "I'm still 
listenin'." 

"You got out just in time, Joe," Happy congratulated, 
patting the recidivist's knee. "To make it short, a friend 



THE RE 



By Pti. VI( 

Ti 



of mine — ■ a guy that owes me plenty of favors had me 
to lunch today. He'd gone respectable, even went to work. 
But this deal that falls in his lap this mornin' is too good. 
His boss — a guy called Rogers — is makin' a big cash 
deal tnnisjht. For badly needed — but hit,'lily restricted — 
aluminum." 

"Get what he means," Bugs nudged Nicco. "It's a dark 
transaction." 

"Bugs means black market," Happy interpreted. "But 
because it's one of those deals, it's right up our alley. 
Rogers is gonna be at his office about nine o'clock to close 
the deal. We pop in on them and heist the dough. Accord- 
ing to this friend of mine, Rogtrs can't open his yap, so 
we're in the clear. Neat, huh?" 




— 20 — 



[DIVIST 



RUYMEN 



"Real tidy," Nicco grinned. "How about the rest of the 
set-up. Just as neat?" 

Happy shrugged. "Only heard about Rogers this after- 
noon. Haven't had time to check the details, but this is a 
once-in-a-lifetime shot. Fifty grand in it." He shook his 
head in deep thought. "That's a lotta moola." 

Nicco grunted. "We should take a little time to prepare." 

"You need dough to get rid of that dish-water com- 
plexion, don'tcha," Happy snarled. "This is our big chance. 
Are you in or aintcha ? We're on our way there now, so 
make up a quick mind." 

"Sure, sure, I'm in," Nicco said promptly. He didn't 
really like doing a job without preparation, but Happy 
wasn't a guy to take chances — only if the value exceeded 
the risk involved. And Bugs, while a goofball, was the best 
chauffeur he'd ever seen behind a wheel. 

"So O. K., you're in," Bugs shouted happily. "So let's 
go. Just like the old days, huh Nicco?" 

"Bugs, you let Nicco drive this load, and you pick up a 
car — nothin' too fancy this time — and you follow us to 
16th Street and Lexington. We'll leave the convertible 
there and ride with you. After the job, we ditch your load 
and pick up the convertible. Our usual set-up." 

Bugs "borrowed" a car and nine o'clock found the three 
partners in the lonely, stone chasm which, after dark, is 
Fourth Avenue a few blocks from Union Square. Happy 
handed Joe a Luger. "Just get the watchman to open the 
outer door. Fve got a pass key to Rogers' office," he said. 

Joe nodded nervously. Approaching the big glass door, 
he beckoned to the watchman sitting near the elevator. The 
watchman came forward and opened the door about an inch 
to explain that the building was closed. Then he saw the 
weapon in Joe's shaking hand. 

"Open Sesame" never opened a door faster. In a flash, 
Joe and Happy were inside, with Bugs making a V for 
victory sign from the wheel of the getaway car. Nicco 
crashed his gim butt on the watchman's head and dragged 
him into the shadows, out of view of the glass door. He 
felt better now. His nervousness was gone. He always felt 
better in action. 

They mounted the marble stairs to the rear of the ele- 
vator. Before room 202, Happy quietly opened the dark- 
ened office door. Stealthily they tip-toed towards the light 
emitting from a rear office. Low murmurs from within 
covered up what slight noise they made. Then they were 
through the door before the two startled men, sitting at the 
broad mahogany desk, realized their presence. Happy 
searched them both as Nicco covered from the doorway. 
From an inner pocket of one of the men, Happy trium- 
phantly withdrew a huge sheaf of bills. Hate showed in 
the eyes of the two business conspirators, but neither pro- 
tested as they sat silent, white-faced and shaken. Happy 




"Nicco swung in the direction of the onrushing 
group of shadowy figures. . . ." 

bound and gagged them. 

Nicco walked to the window, checked the street below, 
and signaled to the waiting Bugs to start the motor. "O K., 
Happy, let's go." 

Down the marble steps they sped, taking them two at a 
time. As they reached the inert form of the watchman, the 
loud, raucous voice of a burglar alarm screamed its urgent 
message. 

Nicco stopped short angrily waving his Luger. "One of 
those creeps must have reached an alarm." 

"Too late, Nicco, let's go. We can make it." 

In the street, just as they neared the darkened car at 
the curb, a single shot blasted the stillness. "Drop those 
guns," multiple voices shouted. 

Nicco swung in the direction of the onrushing group of 
shadowy figures and raised his gun. A hail of lead crashed 
into his flesh. As he slumped slowly to the ground, Bugs 
slammed the car into gear and fled amidst a rain of bul- 
lets. Happy thrown aside by the car's mad surge meekly 
raised his hands." 

"Let the car go," someone shouted, "This mug will 
talk." 

"Talk?" Happy inquired in a puzzled voice, "Isn't this 
a hi-jack?" 

The young man in civvies bending over the crumpled 
body of Joe Nicco — the late recidivist — smiled grimly. "Hi- 
jack," he repeated in amazement. "We're cops — just 
finished a sergeant's class at the school across the street !" 



■21 — 



<Th* 



Legal 
Bureau: 




LAW HIGHLIGHTS 

Identification of the Accused Before 
and During Trial 



Tj^REQUENTLY, the issues in the trial of a criminal case 
■*■ narrow down to that of identification of the alleged 
perpetrator of the crime. Very often, because of the lapse 
of time between the commission of the crime and the trial 
of the accused, the witness is unable to identify with com- 
plete certainty the defendant before the court as the person 
who committed such crime. 

In a recent decision of the New York Court of Appeals, 
it was held that if a witness, at the time of trial, is unable 
to swear that the accused is the perpetrator of the crime, 
but can swear that on a previous occasion he identified the 
accused as the perpetrator, such testimony may be regarded 
by the jury as a positive identification of the accused. 

The ruling in the case of People v Spinello, decided July 
11, 1951 in the Court of Appeals and reported in the New 
York Law Journal of January 9, 1952, concerned the inter- 
pretation of Section 393-b of the Code of Criminal Pro- 
cedure which reads : "When identification of any person is 
in issue, a witness who has on a previous occasion identified 
such person may testify to such previous identification." 

In the Spinello case, the principal witness, "A," was the 
victim of a holdup at his place of business. He reported 
that the "get away" car bore a license plate containing two 
"4s." On the same day, Spinello and another man were 
apprehended by the police because they were riding in a 
car bearing such a license. "A" was called to the police 
station and after talking with some police officers, was 
confronted with the two men. He identified Spinello as one 
of the robbers. 

During the trial, "A" was asked whether he saw the two 
men whom he had confronted in the police station. Pointing 
to the defendents, he said, "Well, if that is the two men I 
saw, that is the two men here." He further testified that 
during the visit to the police station, he identified one of the 
two men. When asked which one, he pointed out Spinello 
in the courtroom. Later, "A" testified that, at the police 
station that day, he saw Spinello. During the further course 
of the trial, while testifying as to what Spinello had done 
during the holdup, he said, "The day I identified him I 
thought it was Spinello. I am not sure, after three years. 
I thought he was smaller than he is, as a matter of fact." 

The trial judge then took over the questioning. He asked 
"A" whether he had recognized Spinello at the police station 
as the man who had been at his place of business. The 
witness said "Yes." The judge then asked whether he 
"now" (that is, at the time of the trial) stated that Spinello 
was the man who took part in the holdup or whether "A" 
thought he was or presumed he was. The witness an- 
swered, "I said he is, Judge." The Court said, "All right. 
Let us get it definitely." 

At this point, it appeared that the witness had positively 
stated that the defendant before the court, Spinello, was 
the man he identified in the police station and was the man 
who had participated in the robbery. However, during sub- 
sequent cross-examination, "A," pressed by Spinello's 
counsel as to the certainty of his identification said, "As 



I am sitting here I would not swear." 
Spinello neither took the stand nor did 
he call witnesses on his behalf. The de- 
fendant's position was that testimony 
admitted under Section 393-b was not 
substantive evidence, or evidence in chief, 
but was usable merely to bolster a wit- 
ness' credibility; and that if such be its 
effect, there was on the whole case, no 
sufficient proof of guilt. The People, of 
course, maintained that such testimony by 
the witness as to a previous identification 
by the same witness, was a positive identification. 

Thus the issues narrowed down to interpretation of 
Section 393-b of the Code of Criminal Procedure. Appar- 
ently, the witness was honestly able to swear that the 
accused, in court, was the man he identified at the police 
station. But he had some compunction, as brought out on 
cross-examination, as to swearing that the accused 'd'as 
one of the robbers. Under the law in this State, both by 
the Constitution and by statute, an accused may only be 
convicted upon testimony given under oath by witnesses 
who confront him and who are subject to cross-examination. 
Here we have a situation where the witness states that 
he cannot swear that the accused on trial is the robber. 
Thus there isn't a positive identification of the accused by 
a witness under oath. But he does say positively that, at the 
station house, he identified a man as being one of the 
robbers. The question posed was : Is his testimony as to 
his previous identification, when he was not under oath, 
to be considered merely as corroboration, or can his testi- 
mony be considered as substantive proof of identification? 
The Court of Appeals held that the language and mean- 
ing of Section 393-b are quite plain. The whole purpose 
of the section would seem to be to remove the brand of 
inadmissible hearsay from such testimony, and to create a 
statutory exception to the general rule prohibiting proof 
that a witness had made similar statements earlier. 

It is interesting to note that in this opinion, the Court 
of Appeals remarked that there is no rule of law which 
requires an identification to be positive beyond any shadow 
of doubt. An honest witness called on to identify someone 
he has seen only once may readily admit that, while he is 
quite sure of identity, he cannot be absolutely sure. In the 
Spinello case, there was even more, since "A" said he had 
positively identified the defendant at the police station and 
was sure that the man being tried in the courtroom was the 
man he had identified at the police station. 

The judgment of conviction was affirmed by the Court 
of Appeals. Thus, the finding in this case is controlling. 
If a witness can swear that on a previous occasion he 
identified the accused as the perpetrator but, after a lapse 
of time, is unable to swear at the trial that the accused is 
the actual perpetrator, the jurv may regard such tistiniony 
as a positive identification. 



This material was prepared by Policewoman Rose L. 
Weisler of the Legal Bureau. 



Do You Hay/e These Issues? 

SPRING 3100 is very anxious to obtain two issues which 
appeared during 1930 — October, and the combined Xovem- 
ber-Dccember. 

If you have one or both of these issues, please let us know 
and we will send the necessary postage for forwarding them. 



— 22 



StcuMn^ ih the Xitfafi^ 

by REBECCA B. RANKIN, Librarian 

Miiniz-ipril Reference l ihrnry 



Policemen familiar with Soderman and O'Connell's 
Modern Criini>ial Investigation will be glad to hear that a 
Fourth edition "completely rewritten, revised, and reset" 
is now available in the Municipal Reference Library'. 

The book has a more professional look than the earlier 
edition and invites study. Many new skills and techniques 
and some new problems have emerged in the sixteen years 
since the publication of the Third edition and all of them 
seem to find mention here. Six new chapters have been 
added, dealing with police organizations here and abroad, 
problems with missing persons (almost entirely N.Y.C.), 
elements of toxicology, drug addiction, "some problems for 
the uniformed police" (handling of crowds and parades, 
control of riots, etc.), and plant protection (work of 
saboteurs, outline of plant protection plan). The number of 
illustrations has grown from 31 to 176. Questions no 
longer encumber each chapter but form a nine page chapter 
of their own at the end. 

Mr. Soderman, in his preface, mourns the loss of the 
"inspiration, the rich experience and valued collaboration 
of the late Inspector O'Connell," formerly his co-author. 
At the same time, he pays tribute to the "cordial assistance" 
received from the late inspector's colleagues, and his ac- 
knowledgments mention by name at least twenty-five other 
members of the New York City Police Force whose services 
contributed to the organization of the book. 

For groups interested in preparing students for work 
in some field of forensic science, Ralph Turner's book 
Forensic Science and Laboratory Technics may be recom- 
mended. Short chapters present the use of photography, note 
taking, scale drawing, collection and preservation of evi- 
dence, use of chemistry and serology, study of documents, 

report writing, and courtroom procedure. Well illustrated. 

* * * 

Dissatisfied with the usual procedures in dealing with 
"drunken drivers" and with the use of common criteria 
which afford "neither the certainty that the guilty will be 
apprehended nor that the innocent will not be wrongfully 
charged," Glenn C. Forrester has written a book. The Use 
of Chemical Tests for Alcohol in Traffic Law Enforce- 
ment. It is really a ninety page brief for the "intoximeter" 
developed by the author which will determine the blood- 
alcohol rather than the amount of liquor taken into the 
stomach. Suggested procedures are given and legal aspects 
discussed. * * * 

A serious study in the field of juvenile delinquency is 
"An Experiment in the Prevention of Delinquency: the 
Camhridge-Somerville Youth Study" by Edwin Powers and 
Helen Witmer. (N. Y. : Columbia University Press. 1951. 
649 p. 347.171 P87 ep). The experiment lasted over a 
period of ten years. The median period of treatment for 
each boy was five years with a maximum of eight years. 
The average age of the boys at the start of the treatment 
was ten and a half years. The continuity of the study was 
somewhat broken up by the war which caused changes in 
personnel and took many of the boys into the army and 
defense work. The method used was to give "personal ad- 
vice and guidance through the services of paid visitors . . . 



who will come to know the boys intimately, to see them 
frequently, and to influence their conduct." 

As one of the most extensive and well-documented ex- 
periments in a field that has only of recent years come to 
the fore, this book will prove valuable to social workers, 
workers with children, probation officers and all those inter- 
ested in the prevention of crime and the rehabilitation of 
criminals. * * * 

A three-foot speedometer, electrically controlled and be- 
lieved to be the only one of its kind in the country, was 
recently placed in service by the Seattle Police Department. 
The speedometer is mounted on the rear of a police car and 
will enable motorists to check the accuracy of their own 
speedometers. 

"The purpose is to make drivers more speed conscious," 
Ted Ahner, Chief of the Traffic Division, said. "If a driver 
pulls up behind the big speedometer, he will be able to 
check his own speed and will be reminded more empha- 
tically of the speed limit." 

The device was developed at Washington State College 
in cooperation with Capt. R. W. Zoltman of the Seattle 
Traffic Division. It was designed and built by Professor 
Homer J. Dana and two students. Merle Beckman and 
Brendan Byrne. 

The speedometer covers a speed range of 15 to 40 miles 
an hour. At night, speed is indicated by lights. 

POLICE LODGERS 

(Confinued from page 79^ 

Started in a spirit of unwise philanthropy. By law, the 
Police Department was required to give shelter to all house- 
less vagrants. It was impossible to keep the quarters of 
the tramps clean or decent, and there were no facilities 
whatsoever to make the lodger either wash or work. In 
consequence, the lodging houses were repulsive to a degree 
in character and only dire necessity could pursuade a decent 
man or woman to take refuge in them. . . . That the change 
was made was due chiefly to the establishment by the 
Board of Charities of a Municipal Lodging House where 
all homeless wanderers [that] are received were forced to 
bathe, were given night-clothes before going to bed, and 
were made to work next morning." 

The establishment of the Municipal Lodging House 
removed the lodgers from the police station houses. In their 
new quarters, according to the 1896 Report of the Board 
of Charities, the lodger was "required to give his name, 
address and place of last employment. These references 
are then investigated. If the reference is unfavorable or 
not bona fide, or if the lodger presents himself more times 
than is deemed necessarj', he is taken to court for commit- 
ment as a vagrant if the magistrate deems such steps 
advisable." 

Documentary material on the police lodgers is scant 
and its long history has been buried by the passage of time. 
Fortunately, Jacob A. Riis made some photographs which 
were just recently discovered and turned over to the Mu- 
seum of the City of New York. Among his photographs 
were some of the police lodgings of 1891. Through the 
courtesy of the Museum, SPRING 3100 is able to repro- 
duce them for the benefit of its readers. The captions are 
excerpts from some of his writings which so capably 
describe the conditions existing at the time. 



SPRING 3100 gratefully acknowledges the assistance 
received from Miss Grace Mayer, curator of the Print 
Collection at the Museum of the City of New York. 



■23 



t^pt^H the X/he 



News About Police Department Organizations =^ 



PB A Campaigns For Pay Raises 



ON March 6, the PRA in coujunc- 
tion with the United Civil Service 
Committee appearetl before the Board 
of Estimate and made a stronsj plea 
for increases in salary. The United 
Civil Service Committee, which was 
recently formed, is composed of rep- 
resentatives of all civil service em- 
ployees including the firemen who have 
united their efforts to secure pay 
raises. 

Meanwhile, in Albany, the Assembly 
has passed the bill introduced by the 
PBA for the five-day work week. It 
now goes to the Senate for further 



action. Regardless of the legislative 
outcome, the PBA is making efforts 
to have the five-day week introduced 
in New York City through conferences 
with the Mayor and other officials who 
have it in their power to grant it. 

The PBA announces that as a result 
of its consultations with the United 
Medical Service and the Health 
Insurance Plan, police officers are 
eligible to join either service. The 
HIP which ordinarily is open to mem- 
bership on a group plan only has been 
made available to any individual police 
officer who wishes to join. 




THE HONOR LEGION has installed Dave Salter as its president for 1952. Shown at 
the installation are, left to right, Comm. George P. Monaghan, Pres. Dave Salter, 
Mayor Vincent R. Impellitteri and Chaplain William Martin, Port of Embarkation. 




WILLIAM F. BURKE OF TRAFFIC G has been installed as president of the Traffic Squad 
Benevolent Association. At the installation were, left to right, John Carton, PBA presi- 
dent; Wm. F. Burke; Mel Allen, guest speaker; D. P. C. Aaron Frank, installing officer. 



THE CAPTAINS' ASSOCIATION wishes 
to remind its members that it will hold 
its meetings at the 71st Regiment 
Armory, 33rd .Street and Park Avenue 
on the second Thursday of each month. 

THE LIEUTENANTS' BENEVOLENT AS- 
SOCIATION has eslablibhed the follow- 
ing program as its goal in 1952: 

• Extra day vacation, equalizing al- 
lotted days to conform with 48 
hour excusal. 

• Free legal service for members. 

• Extension of medical and surgical 
plans to include lieutenants. 

• Changes in work load of desk of- 
ficers, especially as to U.F. 61. 

• Salarj' increase and increments. 

• Income tax exemption on pen- 
sions. 

• Grievance committee. 

The next meeting of the association 
will be held on April 23 at the Hotel 
Governor Qinton at 8:30 P.M. 

THE SERGEANTS' BENEVOLENT ASSO- 
CIATION will hold its next mei-ting on 
April 3 at which time final plans will 
be made for the annual entertainment 
and dance. Reports will be heard from 
the various committee heads who have 
been devoting their time and energy 
to securing better Wf)rking and salary 
conditions. In line with this, the as- 
sociation has been working closely with 
other line org;mizatioiis. 

THE POLICEWOMEN'S ENDOWMENT 
ASSOCIATION will hold its next meet- 
ing at the Hotel Biltmore on April 8 
at 5:30 P.M. On the agenda will be a 
report on the progress made in obtain- 
ing representation on the Relief and 
Pension Boards. Despite the fact that 
policewomen are vitally concerned with 
pension matters and contribute to the 
Relief Fund, they have no representa- 
tion in these bodies and arc hoping to 
correct the situation. The meeting will 
also listen to reports from the Mem- 
bership Committee and the success of 
its operations under its delegate system 
of recruiting new members. There will 
be a discussion on problems affecting 
maternity leave and reports from other 
committees. 



I 



24 



THE ST. GEORGE ASSOCIATION has 

cancelled its plans to hold its annual 
communion on April 20. Instead, June 
8 has been designated as the date of 
this important function. Chairman 
Walter Kuntzmann has begun his pre- 
parations for the service and requests 
all members to make a special effort to 
be present. Members of the association 
will participate in the annual Easter 
Dawn Services which will be held at 
the Flushing Ampitheatre on Easter 
Sunday at 7 :00 A.M. The next meet- 
ing of the association will be held on 
April 3 at the Masonic Building at 
8:00 P.M. 

THE SHOMRIM SOCIETY announces that 
Police Commissioner George P. Mon- 
aghan has accepted the honorary chair- 
manship for the society's 1952 United 
Jewish Appeal campaign. Third 
Deputy Police Commissioner Aaron 
Frank will serve as honorary vice- 
chairman, Chaplain Isidore Frank as 
chairman, and Lieutenant Seymour 
Blau as secretary-treasurer. On April 
5, the society will hold its annual en- 
tertainment and dance at Manhattan 
Center. 

THE HONOR LEGION held a closed 
meeting on March 18 to discuss its 
business affairs. President Salter noted 
the necessity of leveling an assessment 
on the membership in order that the 
meetings could be continued on the 
same basis. The move was made neces- 
sary because of the ruling which bans 
the solicitation of journal ads. Presi- 
dent Salter hoped that the assessment 
would be a temporary measure. Open 
meetings will be resumed, with friends 
and honorary members welcomed. 

THE GREATER NEW YORK POLICE POST, 
VFW has elected the following to 
office for the year 1952 : 

James E. McGuinness Commander 
Thomas R. O'Connell 

Sr. Vice-Comm. 

Walter J. Meyer Jr. Vice-Comm. 

John Walker _ Chaplain 

Leonard G. Gibson Quartermaster 
Daniel J. Sheehan Adjutant 

Installation of officers will take place 
on April 27 at the Iceland Restaurant 
at 5 :30 P.M. 

THE COLUMBIA ASSOCIATION will hold 
its next meeting on April 15 at Werd- 
ermann's Hall, when final plans will 
be made for the installation dinner- 
dance to be held on May 3 at the Hotel 
Aster. 



POLICE GARRISON 3100 announces that 
the state encampment will be held at 
Syracuse, New York from June 25 
to June 29 and that the national en- 
campment will be held at Akron, Ohio 
from August 19 to August 25. Dele- 
gates to the encampment will be elected 
at the May musters. 

THE GUARDIANS ASSOCIATION an- 
nounces that it will return to the policy 
of holding two meetings a month now 



that the sergeant's examination is over. 
Starting in April, meetings will be 
held on the first and third Tuesdays at 
the association's club room. The first 
meeting will be a social meeting and 
refreshments will be served. The sec- 
ond meeting will be the business meet- 
ing. At the business meeting of this 
month, the Board of Officers will pre- 
sent the association's program for the 
year together with plans for improv- 
ing the organization. All members are 
urged to attend both meetings. 



Underwater Atom Bomb "Burst" to Test Civil Defense 



As part of the city-wide Civil De- 
fense training exercise to be held 
on Thursday evening, April 3, it will 
be assumed that an underwater atom 
bomb burst has occurred in Upper 
New York Bay, in the channel south 
of Governors Island. 

Last January, the Division of Civil 
Defense in its Order No. 6 dissemin- 
ated pertinent information concerning 
actual underwater atom bomb bursts. 
The incorporation of a hy.pothetkal 
incident of that nature in the April 
drill serves as a good reason for re- 
viewing the January instructions. In 
case of an actual underwater burst, the 
public is advised that : 

"When leaving your shelter you 
should cover yourself with outer cloth- 
ing, preferably waterproof, cover your 
head, and use rubbers. 

"If you have reason to believe that 
you have been contaminated, ask a 
policeman or air warden for the near- 
est decontamination station where vou 



will be tested for contamination and if 
necessary decontaminated. 

"These decontamination stations will 
be established in various garages 
around a contaminated area and man- 
ned by trained Civil Defense person- 
nel. 

"Immediately after an attack on the 
city, radiac teams will start a survey 
of the radioactivity in all areas believed 
to be contaminated. These teams will 
mark sidewalks and buildings, particu- 
larly at street corners, with colored 
chalk as follows : 

GREEN MARKS or the letter 

"S" means it is safe to stay. 

YELLOW MARKS or the letter 
"C" means it is safe to pass through 
with caution. 

RED MARKS or the letter "D" 
means DANGER, KEEP OUT." 



Intra-Department Pistol Champs 



HP HE 1951 New York City Police 
-*■ Department Individual Champion- 
ship Matches were held on January 17 
at the department's pistol range in the 
71st Regiment Armory. The winners 
in each of the four events were 
awarded gold medals by the Police 
.Sports Association which sponsored 
the matches. In the Timed Fire Match, 
the first three men shot the identical 
score of ninety-eight out of a possible 
hundred. Their scores in the shoot-oft' 
are also listed. The top men in each 
match were : 

AH Around Championship — 
Slow, Time and Rapid Fire 

Ptl. Harold Voelbel, M.T.S _ 298 

Sgt. Victor Sargent, 19th Pet 297 

Act. Sgt. Albert Adams, P.A _..296 



Slow Fire 

Act. Sgt. Albert Adams, P.A 100 

Sgt. Herman Hunter, P.A 98 

Det. George Maloney, Bal. Bur. 97 

Ptl. David G. Graham, Mcy. 



No. 1 



97 



Timed Fire 

Ptl. Arthur Fegan, M.T.S _..98-97 

Act. Sgt. Daniel Tauken, P. A. _98-94 
Ptl. Edward Klenert P.A _ 98-93 

Rapid Fire 

Ptl. Harold Voelbel, M.T.S _ 98 

Sgt. Victor Sargent. 19th Pet 96 

Ptl. Mario Ganci, 67th Pet 94 

Sgt. Frank Lantay. 114th Pet __ 94 



— 25 — 



The Old Forty-Niner 

(Continued from page 8) 

"He comes into police work when he is between 21 and 
28," he told us. "He must be at least 5' 10" and must have 
had a good education. At first, he is employed as an extra 
constable and is assigned to school to take the constable's 
course. If he successfully completes this, he is assigned for 
one year to police duties in the company of an experienced 
officer. After one year of satisfactory performance, he 
enters the National Police School in Stockholm where he 
undergoes a four-and-a-half month course in police organi- 
zation, law and allied subjects. If he passes this course, he 
is made a permanent constable." 

At this point the Old Forty-Niner wanted to know the 
difference in status between an extra constable and a 
permanent constable. "An extra constable," explained the 
inspector, "holds only a non-permanent appointment and 
can be discharged at any time by the Chief of Police, but a 
permanent constable receives a written appointment and 
can only by dismissed by a court for a crime or other 
wrongdoing. So, you see, our police have security in their 
careers just as yours do." "Promotion," he continued, "is 
attained by successful completion of an intensive nine- 
month course at the police school. Constables applying for 
this course are selected on the basis of their record. This 
leads to the ranks of detective constable or assistant in- 
spector (in the uniformed ranks), and later to inspector. 
You see, the only way our men can become detectives in 
the Criminal Investigation Department is by passing the 
course at the National Police School. The highest rank that 
can be attained in our force without a law degree is that 
of superintendent, which is next above inspector." 

"How are the policeman's tours of duty worked out?" 
the Old Forty-Niner wanted to know. "Our uniformed 
men," said the Swedish officer, "do five eight-hour tours 
and then they have one day off. For each of the five days 
their schedule of hours is different. One hour of each day- 
time tour is spent at the police station and two hours of 
each night tour are spent there. In the day time, our 
constables are armed with a sabre and a baton, while at 
night they carry pistols." 

"What about salaries, and do you have a pension sys- 
tem?" the old timer asked. "As for salary, constables, who 
correspond to your patrolmen, get about $162 per month. 
Assistant inspectors, comparable to your sergeants, receive 
$189 and inspectors, on the same level as your lieutenants, 
receive $226. Our men in the uniformed force receive an 
additional uniform allowance. Like you, we also have 
pensions; we retire at age fifty-seven except for those in 
the rank of superintendent who retire at age sixty-two. 
Upon retirement, we receive a pension amounting to sixty- 
two percent of our salary. When we reach the age of 
sixty-seven, we get an additional old age pension of $200 
yearly, to which every Swedish citizen is entitled. A police- 
man's widow, for as long as she remains unmarried, receives 
thirty-one percent of her husband's final salary plus addi- 
tional allowances for up to three children under nineteen 
years of age." 

"You've certainly given us a very good picture of the 
Swedish policeman," said the Old-Forty-Niner. "There's 
just one other thing I'd like to ask about ; do you have any 
policewomen?" "Yes, we have seventeen," was the answer. 
"They are attached to the Criminal Investigation Division. 



To be a policewoman in Stockholm, a candidate must be 
a nurse and must then complete the constable's course at 
the police school. We have no policewomen attached to the 
constabulary, which is our counteqjart of your uniformed 
force. Incidentally, they are allowed to take the inspector's 
course at the Police School on the same basis as the men." 
As the visitor left to inspect another unit of our depart- 
ment, the Old Forty-Niner dashed for his typewriter to 
pound out this report on what cooks with our brethren 
in the land of the Smorgasbord. 



A NEW BOOK: 

Practical Phonographic 
Chemistry 

PRACTICAL PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEMISTRY. By Defectives Chorlej E. O'Hora 
and James W. Osterburg. American Photography Magazine: Publisher, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 189 pages; 1951. 

Detectives Charles E. O'Hara and James W. Osterburg 
have followed up their first book, the monumental "An 
Introduction to Criminalistics," with another gem of re- 
search and compilation. Practical Photographic Chemistry 
undertakes to explain what causes each important photo- 
chemical reaction in such a way that the authors "meet the 
photographer on his own ground." O'Hara and Osterburg 
are members of the New York City Police Department, and 
their new work is dedicated to their colleagues of the Police 
Laboratory "whose encouragement and cooperation have 
made this work possible." 

Practical Photographic Chemistry should prove of spe- 
cial interest not only to members of the department's Pho- 
tographic Bureau and Police Laboratory but also to all 
amateur photographers who want to know the basic funda- 
mentals behind their photo development. However, this is 
not a book that you can digest in a spare hour or two. It 
is a text-book loaded with information, and requires 
thoughtful reading. 

The Preface informs you that "an attempt has been made 
to offer this elementary knowledge of chemistry in terms 
readily understandable by the layman." This makes you 
feel pretty good, as you continue on to Chapter 1, "Funda- 
mentals." But despite the authors' attempt to reduce the 
chemical essentials to what they consider to be utmost sim- 
plicity, a collection of chemical formulas is presented which 
are sufficient to jar you from any complacency you may 
feel because of your high school chemistry course. 

Every facet of the photographic process from emulsions 
through the development procedure, including toning, is 
covered . The book is completely up-to-date even to the 
extent that in this day of the atom bomb, it devotes several 
paragraphs to "uranium printing." It also discusses the 
process and chemistry of the much advertised cameras 
which produce a positive print within a minute after the 
shutter is clicked. 

The final chapter of the book is devoted to the chemical 
compositions of seventy-seven formulas useful in a photo- 
graphic laboraton,'. For the convenience of the reader, 
quantities of the various components are stated uniformly 
in both the metric and the U. S. system. 



— 26- 



STUDY 



POLICE ACADEMY 




HALL 



APRIL, 1952 



QUESTION NO. 1 

When will the seriousness of an injury be reported "Un- 
known" on an aided and accident card? 

QUESTION NO. 2 

If a reporting officer of a vehicular street accident classi- 
fies himself as an eye-witness, what should he be able to 
determine relative to the accident? 

QUESTION NO. 3 

In what circumstance will a hotel be regarded as the 
residence of an aided person? 

QUESTION NO. 4 

In what circumstance will a precinct send a UF 6 card 
marked "Harbor Precinct" to the Harbor Precinct? 

QUESTION NO. 5 

A Department of Sanitation truck is involved in a street 
accident. Will the UF 6 be filed alphabetically, chronologi- 
cally or numerically? 

QUESTION NO. 6 

In what circumstance will a complete new set of supple- 
mentary UF 6 cards be made out and one of the supple- 
mentary cards substituted for the card on file in the precinct. 

QUESTION NO. 7 

Define the term "jurat." 

QUESTION NO. 8 

Distinguish between the terms "Confession" and "Ad- 
mission." 

QUESTION NO. 9 

Define the term "entrapment." Is it legal? 

QUESTION NO. 10 

When may a person be adjudged a habitual criminal? 
To what type of supervision is he subjected? 

QUESTION NO. 11 

Select the incorrect statement: The Prisoner's Meal 
Card, a U.F. 110, may bear the signature of (A) desk 
officer, (B) male attendant, (C) prisoner, (D) police- 
woman. 



QUESTION N0.12 

The Manual of Procedure mentions four principal fac- 
tors that determine the relationship between the Police De- 
partment and the public. State the four factors. 

QUESTION NO. 13 

A person is arrested for Subdivision 11 of Section 722, 
Penal Law. Will a D.D. S2a be prepared in this case? 

QUESTION NO. 14 

Select the correct choice : Each criminal that is photo- 
graphed is given a serial number. The negatives of all 

photos taken of such criminals are filed under such number 
in the Photographic Bureau. (1) A (2) B (3) D (4) E. 

QUESTION NO. 15 

The Ajax Fumigation Corporation desires to fumigate 
a building. What city departments will the Ajax Corpora- 
tion be required to notify? 

QUESTION NO. 16 

Who will deliver evidence that is to be sent to the Police 
Laboratory or Chief Medical Examiner's Office for 
analysis ? 

QUESTION NO. 17 

In the case of a suicide, where a deceased leaves a writ- 
ing signifying his intention of committing suicide, such 
letter, if in possession of the police, shall be delivered to 
the -_ 

QUESTION NO. 18 

When a fraudulent check comes into possession of a force 
member, and the maker of the check is unknown, such check 
will be forwarded to the Police Laboratory if the check is 
in excess of what amount? 

QUESTION NO. 19 

A member of the force coming into possession of a 
counterfeit bill is responsible that it is properly marked 
for identification. Who will mark said counterfeit and in 
what manner will it be marked? 

QUESTION NO. 20 

Counterfeit money coming into possession of this de- 
partment will be delivered to what federal bureau? 



— 27- 



ANSWERS 



ANSWER NO. 1 

When person involved in a vehicular street accident 
claims to be injured but refuses to state his or her injury. 
(Auth. : Article 1, Paragraph 54d.) 

ANSWER NO. 2 

The cause of the accident. (Auth.: Article 1, Paragraph 
64.) 

ANSWER NO. 3 

If he resides there with a responsible member of his 
family. (Auth.: Article 1, Paragraph 69a.) 

ANSWER NO. 4 

Whenever a dead human body is removed from the navi- 
gable waters under the jurisdiction of New York City. 
(Auth.: Article 1, Paragraph 72.) 

ANSWER NO. 5 

Numerically, under accident number. (Auth.: Article 1, 
Paragraph 74.) 

ANSWER NO. 6 

Whenever an unknown or unconscious person is identi- 
fied a complete new set of cards will be prepared from the 
U F 6 on file in the precinct. (Auth. : Article 1, Paragraph 
75.) 

ANSWER NO. 7 

The clause written at the foot of an affidavit stating the 
time and place and before whom such affidavit was sworn. 

ANSWER NO. 8 

The term "confession" is generally restricted to acknowl- 
edgments of guilt. The term "admission" is usually applied 
to civil transactions and to matters of fact not directly 
concerned with the element of intent in criminal cases. 

ANSWER NO. 9 

Entrapment is an act whereby agents of government 
induce a person to commit a crime, not contemplated by him, 
for the purpose of starting a criminal action against him. 
The foregoing is illegal. But where a person has criminal 
interit and an officer merely furnishes him with an oppor- 
tunity to commit the crime, it is not ordinarily illegal 
entrapment. 

ANSWER NO. 10 

(a) When a person is convicted of a felony who has 
been, before that conviction, convicted in this state of any 
other crime, or 

(b) When a person is convicted of a misdemeanor who 
already has been five times convicted in this state of a 
misdemeanor, he may be adjudged by the court, in addition 
to any other punishment inflicted upon him, to be a habitual 
criminal. 

The person of an habitual criminal shall at all times be 
subject to the supervision of every judicial magistrate of 
the county, and of the supervisors and overseers of the 



town where the criminal may be found, to the same extent 
that a minor is subject to the control of his parent or 
guardian. 

ANSWER NO. 11 

C. fAuth; Article 24, Paragraph 7). 

ANSWER NO. 12 

a) The Police — their attitude toward the people of the 
community, their deportment and efficiency. 

b) The Public — the attitude of the people toward their 
police force and law enforcement in general. 

c) Racial and Religious attitudes. 

d) The Press and Publicity. 
(Auth: Article 29, Paragraph 3). 

ANSWER NO. 13 

No. Subdivision 11 is not a part of Section 552 C.C.P., 
but is mentioned in Section 554 C.C.P. which prohibits 
the taking of bail for Subdivisions 6, 8, and 11, Section 722 
of the Penal Paw. fAuth: Article 12, Paragraph 80) 

ANSWER NO. 14 

(2) "B." (Auth: Article 12, Paragraph 99) 

ANSWER NO. 15 

.Sanitary Bureau (Department of Health) of borough. 
Fire Department, local precinct of the Police Department. 
(Auth: Article 13, Paragraph 107) 

ANSWER NO. 16 

Officer finding or coming into possession of evidence. 
(Auth: .\rticle 14, Paragraph 6) 

ANSWER NO. 17 

Chief Medical Examiner or his duly authorized repre- 
sentative. (Auth: Article 14, Paragraph 9) 

ANSWER NO. 18 

.^^lOO. (.\uth; Article 14, Paragraph 10) 

ANSWER NO. 19 

1) Person last in possession writes name and date across 
face, 2) Force member coming into possession writes rank, 
name, .shield number, and date. ( .\uth : Article 14, Para- 
graph 13) 

ANSWER NO. 20 

Bureau of Secret Service (Treasury Department) (Auth : 
Article 14, Paragraph 14) 



The questions and answers in this section were pre- 
pared by Lieutenant Sanford D. Garelik, Police 
Academy. This material is restricted and cannot be 
used in other publications without the permission of 
the Editor. 



— 28 — 



p.p. — RETIRED - P.P. 

Date 
Name Appointed Command 

DEPUTY CHIEF INSPECTOR 

Edward Mullins Oct. 25, 1915 Cent. Off. Burs. & Sqds. 



DISTINGUISHED PUBLIC SERVICE 



LIEUTENANT 

Joseph A. O'Donnell May 15, 1912 



Thomas F. Mulligan 
Richard A. Elfers 



Frederick W. Claus 
Joseph E. Kane 
Joseph Egan 
Stephen H. Huber 
Stanley U. Bauder 
George M. Rooney 
John V. Hamilton 
Edward J. Fitzgerald 
Edward V. Miller 
Thomas J. Cantweil 
Louis H. Larsen 
John L. Mullen 
Ernest W. Malmberg 
Joseph J. Burros 
John Donnelly 
John F. Kelly 
William Dempsey 
Ralph M. Alvarez 
Sylvester P. Davis 
John G. Schellhorn 
John W. Larkin 
Thomas Sullivan 



63rd Pet. 



SERGEANTS 




June 17, 


1926 


66th Pet. 


Jan. 2, 


1930 


13th Pet. 


PATROLMEN 




Dec. 3, 


1912 D.D 


Boro. Hq. Man. W. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


100th Pet. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


103rd Pet. 


Oct. 1, 


1931 


92nd Pet. 


June 25, 


1931 


64th Pet. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


Traf. F 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


June 25, 


1931 


23rd Pet. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


103rd Pet. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


105th Pet. 


July 1, 


1931 


Har. Pet. 


Apr. 6, 


1931 


Traf. F 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


104th Pet. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


14th Pet. 


July 1, 


1931 


64th Pet. 


June 25, 


1931 


48th Pet. 


Dec. 1, 


1931 


Traf. F 


Sept. 25, 


1930 


106th Pet. 


Sept. 4, 


1928 


Traf. O 


Mar. 8, 


1921 


D.D. Boro. Hq. Bnx. 


Nov. 1, 


1926 


30th Pet. 


Mar. 28, 


1930 


30th Pet. 



WELCOME TO NEW MEN 





473 new recruits joined the department on March 1. Chief Clerk 
Vincent E. Finn administers the oath in the presence of Mayor 
Impellitteri and Commissioner Monoghan. Five days later, thirty- 
two additional men were sworn in. 



MAYOR VINCENT R. IMPELLinERI presents o certificate for 
distinguished and exceptional public service to former Police 
Commissioner Arthur W. Vv'allonder, the retiring director of 
the Office of Civil Defense. Hudson R. Searing, president of 
the Consolidated Edison Company, holds a similar citation for 
making it possible for Commissioner Wallander to serve the 
city without cost for more than a year and a half. 



George A. Peterson 
Thomas P. J. Kearney 
John Hammond 
John J. Sweeney 
Charles M. O'Connor 
John H. Franz 
Leonard M. W. Moore 
David Feffer 
Herman A. Gress 
James F. Barsehow 
Thomas J. Bergan 
James J. McNicholas 
Frank C. Voncura 
John W. Hogan 
Bartholomew J. Egan 
Charles R. Gone 
Peter J. Murphy 
William T. O'Neill 
Michael V. Term! 
William H. Collins 
August J. Steimel 
Joseph F. Madden 
Charles W. Taylor 
Edward F. Alfonsin 
Joseph Hofer 
John Phillips 
Joseph F. Lehner 
Lawrence Hoefling 
Timothy F. Hegarty 
Rudolf Schnitzer 
Joseph E. Donohue 
Everett H. Windisch 
James T. Phelan 
Albert Beron 
James P. Malone 
William F. McBride, Jr. 
John J. Gerhard 
Hubert F. Ahearn 



Mary I. A. O'Neill 



June 


17 


1926 


102nd Pet. 


July 


3 


1928 


Traf. K 


Dec. 


18 


1931 


Mtd. Sqdn. 2 


Oct. 


30 


1926 


4th Pet. 


Feb. 


20 


1928 


70th Pet. 


Jan. 


10 


1927 


16th Pet. 


i Sept. 


25 


1930 


B.C.I. 


Apr. 


11 


1930 


C.R.D. 


Oct. 


19 


1925 


108th Pet. 


Sept. 


4 


1928 


E.S.S. 15 


Sept. 


30 


1930 


107th Pet. 


Sept. 


25 


1930 


106th Pet. 


July 


3 


1928 


22nd Pet. 


Nov. 


1 


1926 


Mtd. Sqdn. 1 


Jan. 


31 


1930 


E.S.D. 


Oct. 


19 


1925 


Nar. Sqd. 


Aug. 


27 


1925 D.D. 


Boro. Hq. Man. W. 


Jan. 


26 


1927 


E.S.S. 13 


Nov. 


22 


1926 


28th Pet. 


Jan. 


2 


1930 


67th Pet. 


Dec. 


12 


1927 


17th Pet. 


Jan. 


12 


1927 


92nd Pet. 


Dee. 


20 


1927 


67th Pet. 


June 


26 


1929 


103rd Pet. 


Jan. 


2 


1930 


87th Pet. 


Nov. 


1 


1926 


67th Pet. 


Mar. 


28 


1930 


105th Pet. 


Oct. 


30 


1926 


P.A. 


Dec. 


1 


1931 


103rd Pet. 


Sept. 


27 


1929 


12th D.D. 


Aug. 


25 


1924 


2nd D.D. 


Nov. 


1 


1926 


7th D.D. 


June 


17 


1926 D.D.Boro.Hq.Bklyn.W. 


Dec. 


2 


1924 


18th D.D. 


Sept. 


25 


1930 Cent 


. Off. Burs. & Sqds. 


Dec. 


21 


1925 


Forg. Sqd. 


July 


2 


1908 


G.C.P. Pet. 


Oct. 


16 


1923 


14th Pet. 


POLICEWi 


DMAN 




Feb. 


2 


1925 


Bur. Polw. 



— 29- 



MANHATTAN 

1st PRECINCT: Like most, as we read SPRING 3100, we al- 
ways hoped somehow that someone would say something about the 
First Precinct. But things do not happen by themselves. Every 
happening has a cause. Capt. John J. O'Neill did what we all 
were hoping would be done by someone — that is, to start the First 
Precinct back to press. It has been a long, long time since we were 
last heard from, but we are back in SPRING 3100 bigger and 
better than ever before. The First Precinct has absorbed most of 
the good old "Second Police Department," and also has greatly 
increased its personnel. As Lt. Tabert would say, "It's a pleasure 
to ttjrn out this many men." For many of the old timers from the 
Second Precinct they have returned from whence they started as 
rookies. ... By the time this issue is published the sergeant's exam 
will be history, and all of the sergeant — hopefuls will have breathed 
a sigh of relief. We have some ardent students in our midst, so 
that the First Precinct should be well represented on the list. For 
those of you who come through in the money keep the words of 
Rudyard Kipling in mind, "and walk with kings nor lose the com- 
mon touch." (This is a paid advertisement). Ptl. Heaney is going 
to sell a length of rope to all disappointed sergeant seekers. 
When, Where, Who, What, How, and Why : The stork had 
itself a busy time for the daddys of the First Precinct. Con- 
gratulations to: Ptl. Todd, Ransom, Cooney, and O'Brien. . . . 
Ptl. Tracy and McCullen are welcomed back into the fold after 
serving with the Navy in tlie Korean conflict. Ptl. Tracy was pro- 
moted to full lieutenant on this last tour of duty. . . . Good luck to 
Ptl. Rouvell. He has resigned from tlie force to become a member 
of the FBI. . . . Congratulations to Ptl. D. Clancy and Kelly upon 
taking that all important step into matrimony. . . . The RMP team 
of Golat and McClean made a good burglary arrest. They thought 
it a bit peculiar to see a gas station doing business without any 
lights turned on. . . . Ptl. McNally can also take a bow on his bur- 
glary arrest. . . . Ptl. Tracy made a felonious assault arrest, but 
not before running five blocks, and asking for assistance which came 
in the form of "assist patrolman." . . . Our condolences to Ptl. Fay 
on the loss of his wife. . . . Sgt. Pauze has put in his papers. He 
deserves a "well done" for his efforts as the First Precinct Civil 
Defense Coordinator. Our set-up is one of the best in the city — 
from someone who knows ! . . . Vacancy : Ptl. Cavano has retired. 
. . . Applications are now being accepted for the famed post that he 
has vacated. Tlie post offers "a cottage by the sea," and the pos- 
sibility of making friends and influencing people. Good luck Joe ! 

3rd PRECINCT: Weidenburner reports an increase in popula- 
tion — one of the fairer se.x at that. (Makes for two deductions in 



his annual greeting to Uncle Sam). . . . Sergeant "Georgie" Miller 
reaches the age of retirement on April 28. Hard to believe that 
one looking so young could have spent so many summers without 
showing signs of wear. . . . "Chuck" Kennedy had an experience 
which only happens to a few left to tell about it. Imagine a guy 
stepping into space without wings. Of course, it's OK if you care 
to sprout them. Seems it happened on a late tour while investigat- 
ing an open door. He found an open fire escape instead ! Keep 
on trying "chucky boy" ; you can always patch up a few broken 
ribs. (Not as bad as some guy I know who, whenever he falls, 
uses his head for a cushion to break the fall and without any ill 
effects. But then this could only happen to one guy — "R. D." — That's 
close enough without mentioning names). . . . John Gottlock carry- 
ing books these days, but not the M. of P. or R. & R.. We under- 
stand when he completes his studies, which won't be too far off, 
he'll be able to stand on the poop deck of a thirty-footer and be 
master on an unlimited expanse of ocean. Full speed ahead, John, 
and safe journey. While on the subject, we understand that one of 
the newer members of this command has already qualified as a sea- 
faring man — Sgt. Klecak. . . , And not to be forgotten, our own 
Larry Jessup will take you for a short trip around good old Staten 
Island upon request — but take a tip, you'd be safer on shore. . . . 
Age-old adage followed by many — : Ground Hog Day, giving in- 
dications as to kind of weather that can be expected. We, in the 
3rd Precinct, take pride in having our own weather forecaster. A 
certain desk ofiicer was recently overheard remarking that his upper 
lip was starting to take root which is an indication that Spring will 
soon be upon us. Nothing like perseverance, (jood old dogged 
determination; that's what it is. . . . Can't tell at this writing how 
many new sergeants will spring from our midst, but the competi- 
tion was tough and rough. Esprit de corps can best be described 
in a remark heard just prior to the exam: "Hope you get a 90 and 
I'm right in front of you." . . . However, if you don't show, don't 
be disheartened. When they refer to New York's Finest, they 
don't mean officers alone, but every last cop too. Chin up. We're 
getting a raise soon anyway — who said that? And it wasn't Ripley. 
... As a parting shot, we felt the column from this command 
would not be complete unless some proverb, poem, story, etc. was 
included. So why be different this time? Here goes: 

"// is better to light just one little candle 

Than to stumble in the dark 
Far better to light just one little candle 

All it takes is but a spark 
If xvc'd all say a prayer that man may be free 

What a zi'ondcrful dau-n of a new day we'll see. 

— NUFF said. 



WHERE ARE YOU? 

Material carried under "Looking 'Em Over" is prepared 
by volunteer reporters in various commands of the deport- 
ment. If your precinct is missing from this issue it is because: 
(1) No one has volunteered as your reporter (2) Your re- 
porter has not sent us any material (3) Your reporter's ma- 
terial reached us after our deadline. Names of our precinct 
reporters are listed inside the front cover except in those 
cases where they have requested that they be allowed to 



remain anonymous. 

We appreciate very much the cooperation of our report- 
ers in the field, but we should like to remind them that we 
must have their copy in our hands by the 5th of each month 
for inclusion in the next month's issue. We hove a printer's 
deadline to meet if we are to publish on time. The coopera- 
tion of oil will be much appreciated. And remember, please, 
it should be typed double-space on one side of the paper. 



30- 



13th PRECINCT: Last month your reporter made a Boo Boo. 
Ptl. Hoffman one of our efficient precinct attendants failed to get 
a mention along with our other attendants. As we all know Hoff- 
man and Spic-and-Span go together as well as Cadillacs and ermine. 
. . . Ptl. Holcroft relates that the rookies addressed him as "Mr. 
Holcroft." Now after six months, the upstarts greet him with 
"Hello Baldy." More about Vinnie Holcroft (without being 
prompted, pushed or threatened, strictly on my owii) — Isn't Vinnie 
just about the nicest guy around? . . . We hear that Ptl. Mayer is 
taking vitamin pills to build up for the battle of the century against 
Big Barney Kane. Personally my money is on Kane. . . . The 
Baron isn't in a radio car, because he just don't fit. . . . Ptl. No- 
vello doesn't photograph well at all but the Daily News found out 
the hard way, with a front page shot of our boy and two cute little 
lost children. If you wondered WHY you couldn't buy a News in 
all of Manhattan and need any portion, other than the front page, 
you can obtain same by writing or stopping in at the 13th Pet. and 
asking for Charlie Novello. . . . Congratulations to Ptl. Herbek 
and Pflum on their new additions. Each was blessed with future 
li'l patrolmen, both are eight pounds. . . . After twenty-five years 
or more of faithful service with the 13th Pet. our good friend Ptl. 
Bob Hammil passed away. Bob's lively humor and pleasant dis- 
position will never be forgotten by the men who knew him in this 
command. Our sincerest sympathy to Mrs. Hammil. Also to Ptl. 
Giannone on the loss of his mother, and to Ptl. Porcaro on the loss 
of his father-in-law. ... A speedy recovery to Ptl. Petillon at 
Bellevue Hospital; and to Ptl. Pouch's little boy, who has narrowly 
escaped death, and is also at Bellevue. ... By the time this edition 
is out we will know how we made out on the Sgts. exam. To those 
who pass, take it easy on your men. To those who flop, wait till 
the next one, and keep smiling. 

15Ui PRECINCT: Women of the Month— We tip our hat to 

the wives, mothers and sweethearts, who gave up their social life, 
in order that the boys in blue, could spend extra hours on the 
books studying for the sergeant's examination. . . . Hidden Talent 
— In Jerry Dorry's fine cartoon, which was published in the March 
issue of SPRING 3100. . . . Sympathy — To Nick Arpino, on the 
loss of his mother. . . . Happy Bibthday — To Sil Abbadessa, Pete 
Cavaretta, Bob Flood, Henry Grote, Marty Mitchell, Jim MuUany, 
Tony Vincent, Jules Wilson and Sgt. John Robb. . . . Communion 
Breakfast — Mrs. Van Gosig's boy, George, is our Holy Name dele- 
gate and he is working overtime to insure a terrific turnout for the 
annual affair at the Hotel Astor. . . . Spring Fever — They say you 
can't recognize the players without a scorecard and so we call to 
your attention that the Yankee rooters are Tom Swift, Joe Veyvoda 
and Jim Buccino. The "dyed in the wool " Giant fans are Lt. Pete 
Volberg, Det. Neil Connolly and the entire 15th Squad. The Brook- 
lyn delegation, whose war cry is : "Class Will Tell," is headed by 
Ed Sullivan, Nick Arpino, Brian Schrock and Charlie Collins. . . . 
Golf — George Hiller, Bob Hand, Tom Connolly, Jack Potter, Marty 
Duffy and Kaye Myers are getting their clubs in order for the out- 
door season — Fishing — Henry Grote at the "Sportsmen's Show" 
looking at the price tags on the rods and reels. . . . Sgt. Paul Mar- 
golin, is saying for the record that the Bushwicks could beat the 
three local baseball teams on the same Sunday afternoon. Golf 
Title — When will Tom Moher meet George Hiller for the golf 
championship of the 15th Pet.? Easter Parade — Is there romance 
in the air for Doug Wisnofsky and a local gal singer? He's an 
eligible bachelor. . . . Auld Lang Syne— Sam Kirwan, who retired 
after 24 years in the job. . . . East Side-West Side— In a city of 
8,000,000 — where people of every race, creed, and color work and 
live side by side — problems and" differences arise which, other means 
failing, must be heard and settled peacefully through the courts of 
the city. However, the 87 patrol precincts throughout the city are 
the "catch-all" of many varied complaints. Here in the "15th," we 
see each night of the year some dramatic moments torn from every- 
day life: Domestic quarrels involving husband and wife; land- 
lord vs. tenant, in which the landlord or super, doesn't supply hot 
water or steam heat; female vs. female, always offering to finish 
out the fight in front of the desk officer — "I'll tear out every 
bleached hair in her head" ; runaway children, picked up in Grand 
Central station who "wanted to see the bright lights of New York" ; 
drunks — never ever had more than "two short beers" although they 
still need two cops to hold them up and stand accused of taking a 



bar apart; shop lifters who try to get the better things in life the 
easy way and always get caught. Here there are no rehearsed lines 
or glib curtain speeches — the curses, shouts and angry remarks 
spurt out like water from a tap. As our tour ended and we were 
walking out the door, the thought suddenly came to our mind that 
the good humor, plain common sense and patience of our station 
house desk officers often provide more "good law" in one night 
than did Blackstone in his lifetime. 

22nd PRECINCT: April showers bring May flowers and this is 
where we really do see the flowers ! We cordially invite all readers 
to see die cherry blossoms on the East Drive, where the obelisk is 
surrounded by beauty and the Belvedere Tower is framed with 
flowers. . . . Who do you think retired last month? Our erstwhile, 
and we say erstwhile because we always felt that he was our 
staunch friend and yet nary a word from the guy, Abe DeKlade 
who had developed the service of a summons into an art. After 
thirty-one years and 75,000 summonses, he decided to cap his ball- 
point pen. The service of a summons, per se, is a distasteful task, 
but when Abe observed a violation, the offender may have been 
piqued to have been caught, but surely not at the service. Abie's man- 
ner was one that diplomats would do well to emulate. Well, Abe 
even if you didn't say so long, Sarah isn't mad. We wish you the 
best of everything in your new pursuit. May it be a gute Yontif ! 
. . . And Bill Clancy proudly distributed cigars at the birth of his 
second son. The birth was a difficult one for his wife, but she is 
now well on the road to recovery and the baby is doing well. Good 
luck to the Clancy family. . . . Buddy Gore e.xercised a bit of in- 
genuity by utilizing a nearby ladder and rescuing a boy trapped in 
the lake. Buddy slid the ladder over the ice and crawled out to the 
boy, helped him onto the ladder and then ashore. Good work! . . . 
Talked to our good friend Sgt. Al Abrams on the Range. It's a 
pleasure to listen to Al instruct a group of probationary men on 
the proper use of the revolver, its nomenclature, and when to use 
the weapon. But then it's always a pleasure to listen to a man who 
knows his subject well. ... A welcome visitor dropped by today. 
Lt. Miller, late of the 22nd and now of the 11th, stopped by to 
have a few words with the boys and perhaps to reminisce about the 
pleasant stay he enjoyed with us. . . . The command extends con- 
gratulations to Al Wagenhoffer whose goldfish had guppies. (We 
don't know if this is the right word for goldfish babies, but it 
sounds good.) We had been depending recently on Tack Keeney for 
the laughs in the colyum but so far this month he hasn't come for- 
ward with any gags, so we'll have to think some up. Tommy Bren- 
nan getting fatter than a house; and when we think back not to 
long ago, Tom would have had to grab aholt of the nearest lamp- 
post if a breeze came along. . . . The boys are doing a good job 
at the WoUman. The crowds are now trained due to the diligent 
efforts of our senior man. Jack Lynch, who does every phase of 
police work well. Jack has the barrier system down to a "T" and 




-^'.-. 



Wiy CiluT you JusT HIT IT ViiTH 4 fHocM wff OTH£K HUSM/iK jwr* 



— 31 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-rcon»mu.d; 



control of the groups is now a relatively siiiiiilc task. Lxperieiice 
tells! . . . The students by now will be conducting a daily post- 
mortem on the sergeant's exam which will go thusly : "I knew that 
was the answer ; I read it only the night before." "Do you think 
they'll make it an alternate?" "When was that amendment added? 
Well, how come they didn't tell nie?" "That exam was easy !" "That 
test was lousy ! Those blankct\-blank . . . whoever said they knew 
how to draw up an exam?" Ah! well, remember men, there's al- 
ways another one. . . . Did you hear the one about the fellow who 
was driving an old, dilapidated wagon over the bridge? Seems that 
the toll-collector asked for a fifty cent toll and the driver was 
chagrined that he, with his old wagon would have to pay fifty cents. 
The collector said it was necessary ; everyone had to pay. Reluctantly 
the man paid. On the way back, just before reaching the toll-sta- 
tion, the man got olT the wagon, put the horse in the seat, got be- 
hind the traces and approached the station. The collector looked at 
the man and said, "Fifty cents, please." Glaring back, tlie man 
replied, "Whatta ya botherin' me for? Ask the driver!" ... So, 
the fellow said to the lush, "Are you driving?" "Sure," said he, 
"I'm too drunk to walk!" . . . Phil Micca anxious to test Oiv 
Abrams out on the Range. What will the outcome be? Be sure to 
read next month's column! It will be stupendous. . . . Sam Rosello 
and J. Keeney a good team. Good hard working men. . . . Mark 
MofTat is drawing up suggestions as to how we can write a meatier 
colyum with something to it. On our vacation, we're inviting 



Mark as guest columnist. OK, Mark? 



Can you imagine? We 



almost forgot the birthday greetings of the month and that w^ould 
have been a minor tragedy ! However, we didn't, so we say "Happy 
Birthday" to Tom Brennan, Vince Conway, Curtis, Joe McLafTerty, 
John Norman, Tom O'Sullivan, Frank Pryal, Ed Quigley, Al Robi- 
taille, Ray Severin, Em Urban, and Al Wagenhoffer. . . . Why does 
Finbar Devine keep his sergeantcy in New York's 165th Infantry 
(the old Fighting 69th) quiet? . . . Until next month, men, Keep 
the Faith! 

23rcl PRECINCT: For reasons beyond our control we failed to 
make an appearance in these pages Jan. and Feb. We are very sorry 
and promise to do better in the future. Old Business:— We wish 
to congratulate Lts. Higgins, Tauber and Houseman on dieir pro- 
motions and wish them the best in their new assignments. A hearty 
welcome to Lts. Sadlier and Hellman, and Sgts. Jiranek and Dauner. 
We hope your stay with us will be a very happy one. Sgt. Dauner 
came downstairs from the 23rd Sqd. Therefore he is no stranger 
to us. Also a very big welcome to the men who joined us from 
the Police Academy, and Zgombick, Linquinti and O'Shea who 
joined us from plainclothes. Emergency Service and Traffic. In 
exchange, we gave Otto and Fendel to plainclothes, and McGuhg 
to the Detective Division. . . . We got word from Harold Soppe who 
resigned recently and moved to Calif. He would like very much 
to hear from his friends in the precinct. . . . Jack White, very natty 
in his Air Force uniform with wings, paid us a visit last month. 
Jack was transferred to Jersey from Florida, and promised to visit 
us often. Boy — did he lose his RMP waistline, and very prosperous 
looking too. . . . Our Ancient Mariners, Eliot and Stagliano, taking 
time out from some very '.jrood arrests, did it auain. This time it 



was a barge that turned over in their sector. Speaking of Eliot, he 
has become an ice skating fan, in a big way, in Central Park after 
a late tour yet. . . . Heard in the Back Room; — Sgt.: "That re- 
placement car in sector five has a one way radio." Ptl. Perkins : 
"Which way, Sarge?" luid of quotalicin an<l Augie Perkins. . . . 
Eddie White has hung up his shield for a life of ease. The best of 
everything Eddie, and let's hear from you. . . . New Additions : — 
Boys to Cavanaugh and LaMarita, and a girl to John McGuinness. 
Stelling's wife has been making him sweat, but by the time you 
read this he should be a proud father. . . . Congratulations to Dets. 
Zinkand, Malerba and Hefferen on their well deserved promotions 
to First Grade Detectives. . . . Bill Snyder had just returned from 
court where he testified on a gun pinch he made, and was on his way 
to a school crossing when he nabbed a burglar after a long shoot- 
em-up chase. . . . The sergeant's exam has come and gone. To the 
successful ones, congratulations. To the less fortunate ones, better 
luck next time, and I hope no serious casualties. . . . For the cop 
least likely to get ulcers, I give you Ptl. Burke. He is beyond a 
doubt the happiest man we've met to date. Wonder if he would part 
with his formula. I know a lot of people who could use some laughs, 
or at least learn how to smile. . . . Please fellas — that box in tlie 
back room with "SPRING 3100" tagged to it is for news items, 
not for cigarette butts and trash. . . . Charlie Doemer is back from 
a long illness. Good to see you Charlie, welcome back. . . . The 
newer men probably don't know, and a lot of us haven't paid at- 
tention, so let's take this time to congratulate Sgt. Speigle, Jerry 
Claps and Nat Manas on the tremendous job they have been doing 
and are doing with the Civil Defense Program of the precinct. . . . 
April is the month of parades, but it also brings die nicer weather, 
which means the golfers in the precinct are beginning to huddle 
in the corners to compare notes. We've lost most of our Bobby 
Joneses by way of transfers and promotions, but we still have Sgt. 
Enright, Bobby Dore, Ray Jones, Fitzpatrick, Moorehouse and 
Rubcnfeld to carry on. . . .We wish to offer our condolences to Ptl. 
Curran on the loss of his beloved wife. ... A big thank you to our 
Third Broom McCabe for accomplishing the impossible by getting 
paper towels and soap in the washroom. Now if we could only have 
a shower installed somewhere in the station house. It shouldn't be 
too difficult to do, and would be so welcome in the hot summer 
months ahead. ... If I've missed anything, it's because I haven't 
gotten much help from the men I never work with or see, so how 
about getting in with some news items. 

25th PRECINCT: Apology. . . .Through a mental lapse on the 
part of your reporter this column failed to appear in the February 
issue of SPRING 3100. We were, however, gratified by the number 
of inquiries as to its absence and the reason therefore, although 
ironically enough one or two lads who complained the loudest have 
.so far failed to contribute any item of interest for inclusion into this 
column. Remember lads, you got a job to do and we got a job to 
do, and between us we'll do the job. . . . Every Knock A Boost. 
. . . Having at various times observed our genial roll-call man, 
Jimmy Monahan, being taken to task despite his best efforts to 
keep everybody happy, we would like to quote for his benefit the 
following passage from the pen of Abraham Lincoln : "If I were 



1^ MmLm 


4 r ' ^ 


K ' f "^ ^B 


- 1 


■ 


HiB 




^^Kd. 


BB 


9 



LIFE SA VING 
MEDALISTS 

William D. Winter, president of the 
Life Saving Benevolent Association 
presents awards to eleven patrolmen 
who rescued persons from drowning 
during the year. 



32 — 



to try to read, much less answer, all the attacks made on me, this 
shop might as well be closed for any other business. I do the very 
best I know how — the very best I can; and I mean to keep doing 
so until the end. If the end brings me out all right, what is said 
against me won't amount to anything. If the end brings me out 
wrong, ten angels swearing I was right would make no difference." 
. . . Wits' EhfD. . . . The long-awaited examination for the rank of 
sergeant will have been held by the time you read this. To those 
who are positive that they made it we offer our congratulations, 
along with the following excerpt as a guide when their big day 
comes : "A 'Boss' has nothing to do. . . . EXCEPT — decide what to 
do and tell somebody to do it; listen to why it should not be done, 
or done by somebody else, or done differently; follow up to see if 
ir has been done and discover it hasn't; inquire why and listen to 
excuses; follow up a second time only to discover that it has been 
done but done incorrectly ; point out how it should have been done 
but conclude that as long as it has been done it may as well be left 
as it is ; consider how much simpler and better the thing would 
have been done if he had done it himself in the first place. . . . 
BUT to do it himself would strike at the very foundation of the 
belief that a 'Boss' has nothing to do." . . . Strange Interlude. . . . 
Eddie Rocchio, although surprised that any venerable patrolman 
with more than his time in the job should be so unwise as to father 
triplets, nevertheless promptly and graciously offered to Inspector 
(of hacks) John Hart his services as a godfather. We don't pre- 
tend to know why John accepted this offer, especially since the 
triplets were merely the figment of an overly active imagination! 
. . . Straws in the Wind. . . Rumor currently has it that our 
long-sought forty hour week may be close to realization. . . . Strip 
Tease. . . . Ray Marmion may soon be the best undressed patrol- 
man in the city if our good citizens continue to rip and tear his uni- 
forms at the present rate. We suggest he look for a Rockaway 
Beach assignment, in a bathing suit. On second thought that might 
not be such a good idea, especially if he met the same or like-minded 
characters! At least he wouldn't be likely to meet any ladies (?) 
witli umbrellas. 

28th PRECINCT: We were sorry to see Frank Mulrooney 
leave us for the 52nd Pet., but we know he'll be as popular and 
universally well-liked there as we found him here ! We bid good- 
bye also to Joe Healy, who left this department for a new post 
with the N. Y. State Supreme Court ! . . . Our worries will be 
(1) over, or (2) just beginning again, by the time this reaches 
print. The sergeant's exam will be history, and only the lucky — or 
should we say, brightest — ones will continue to worry about pro- 
motions. We wish it would be possible to say we hope you all 
passed, but the list is just so long. So we say instead, may those 
most deserving be the fortunate ones who passed! . . . Our heroes 
were again numerous here in the active 28th Precinct, with Joe Zab- 
bara and Howard Randolph leading the parade of valor. Joe and 
Howie answered a "Signal 30," burglary in progress, and entered 
an apartment, the door of which was broken in. They found therein 
two armed miscreants who attacked our boys with switchblade 
knives but were overcome and placed under arrest. The jewelry 
they had stolen was recovered on their persons ! . . . Eddie Engel 
and Ernie Zeh also displayed keen police action when they observed 
a suspicious character whom they followed and ultimately had to 
pursue when he started to flee. After a hand-to-hand struggle, they 
overpowered him. Among his proud possessions were a woman's 
pocketbook, a bible — and a jagged broken bottle! The incongruity 
of the variety of such possessions bore investigation, so Eddie and 
Ernie promptly began sleuthing. A slip of paper in the pocketbook 
bore a woman's name and their visit to her found her in the process 
of being bandaged by a doctor. She had been mugged near a sub- 
way exit and robbed of her bible and pocketbook. She readily iden- 
tified the prisoner as her assailant ! . . . Ernest Sykora also showed 
his mettle with a fine arrest of a man, armed with a loaded revolver, 
who had just shot another man three times. Ernie, hearing the 
shots, proceeded immediately to the scene, and faced the culprit, 
forcing him to drop his gun, after which he placed him under 
arrest. Ernie received a fine citation from the February Term Grand 
Jury expressing their lofty sentiments for his courageous action ! 
. . . Hib Alves and Charlie Leftwich also come in for plaudits and 
accolades— catching muggers in the act of robbing a victim! . . . 
These are typical acts of bravery which are repeated weekly by the 



fine corps of constables here in our 28th Precinct! . . . The 28th 
Precinct P.A.L. went on to win the City-wide Indoor Track and 
Field Championship again this year ! Included in their accomplish- 
ments were three new track records set, and four other top marks 
equalled. They took home from the meet the Mayor's Novice Cham- 
pionship Trophy, the Mayor's Open Championship Trophy, the Po- 
lice Commissioner's Championship Trophy, and the Police Athletic 
League's Most-Points-Scored Trophy. Needless to say, it was the 
crowning achievement of a successful year for the boys and girls 
of the 28th Precinct P.A.L. ! 

30lh PRECINCT: Pt. Lloyd Jones and Ken Lindberg merit 
congratulations for their recent apprehension of two muggers and 
three burglars. Good work, boys. . . . Other excellent felony arrests 
have been made by Ptl. Paul Zindell, Bill Lambert, Paul McKeever, 
Lou Garber, Willie Hughes, Martin Patwell, Earl Allen Jr., Jim 
Shand, Emil Nouza, Charles Edey, Sidney Kaminer, and Lester 
Denmark. Denmark and Kaminer were hospitalized following their 
injury in an auto accident resulting with the arrest of a holdup trio 
in a stolen car. ... A bow to Ptl. Gene Roche, George Dickerson, 
Bill McManus, and all their helpers working under Sgt. Steve De- 
Rosa in our CD. They have done a fine job with regard to the 
promotion of Public Relations. . . . Our top book-worms are Ptl. 
Abe Dubow, Joe Brown, Frank Magyar, Andy Stroud, Mike Vail, 
Joe Johnson, Emil Fikar, George Robeson, and Eddie Puppe. . . . 
Ptl. Edward Dondero afraid to accept that chess challenge? Wonder 
if he'd be reluctant about accepting a chest challenge? . . . New 
Sgts. Hallinan and Karlon are well liked. . . . Ptl. Sam Kinsler and 
Leroy Sealy are T.V. experts. . . . Ptl. Mike Vail drilled and com- 
pleted a 167-foot fresh water well, solo. . . Retired Ptl. Johnny 
Nash, a bartender on Gun Hill Road (please don't give the ad- 
dress!) . . . Ptl. Joe Goldberg in shape for handball and challenges 
all comers (under six years old!). 

BRONX 

43rd PRECINCT: If you had some trouble figuring out the 
end of last month's column just take the line fifth from the 
end and put it after the line third from the end. Simple ain't it? 
. . . Congratulations to Jim Burke and Jim Hadnagy on their 
election as P.B.A. delegates. W't know the boys will be in there 
pitching for us. Maybe something can be done about those school 
crossings that bring you into the S.H. twentv- to thirty minutes 
after a tour. . . . Glad to see Johnny Cahill back with us from 
the division office. . . . Get your cigars from Larry Murray — he 
had a boy ! Just in time to make this issue, too. . . . Joe Kaminski 
is out with an ailing back which he injured chasing a young flat 
burglar with Larry Murray. Hope to see you back soon, Joe. . . . 
Tommy Kirk being a little late the other a.m. came down the 
stairs head over heels. He made a safe landing. . . . Ask Frank 




See, you siiW jerk fhe gun fo fhe left 



33 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-rcon«mu.c/; 



Mainniarclla lidw to say icebox in Italian, , . . Lt. Dunn cclL-bralcd 
his seventceiitli wedding anniversary with his wife last month. 
They have twin daughters and two boys. . . . We saw a few 
lines in the Parkchester Press commending Charley Schneider 
and Bob Nazzaro for the good police work they are doing. . . . 
We saw in the newspaper that tlie Civil Service Commission had 
to certify 876 patrolman eligibles to fill only 500 vacancies on 
March 1. (Wait until they get their first check). . . . Mike De- 
Mc- was out with an optician's daughter and she made a spectacle 
of herself. ... A pessimist is a woman driver who's sure she 
can't park her car in a tight place. An optimist is a man who 
thinks she won't try. . . . WHO is known as the "Why" boy? . . . 
WHO has been giving Norman Papae a hard time? . . . WHO 
is the guy WHO just found out the P.B.A. dues are $1.50 per 
month (R.M.)? . . . WHO had his car wrapped up by his wife? 
. . . WHO had to call for fire apparatus to put out the fire in 
their radio car? . . . WHO was seen riding a three wheel bicycle 
out of the S.H.? . . . WHO threw a banana skin out a window 
and then later slipped on it himself? . . . WHO served a "dog 
bite" form on a protesting woman and later discovered his opera- 
tor had pulled into the wrong street? . . . WHO was seen 
throwing money out of the window of a radio car? (studying 
too hard). . . . WHO had a 2 a.m. notification for Jack O'Leary 
and disrupted the whole household by walking through the bed- 
rooms with his flashlight? (It's a good thing Jack's mother doesn't 
have a weak heart). ... I guess the moans and groans about the 
Sgt.'s exam can be heard far and wide. Most of us are really 
brilliant but we just can't put it on paper. . . . Following is the 
conversation we had with Ray Keane the other day : "How'd 
that fight you had with your wife turn out, Ray?" "Aw, she came 
crawling to me on hands and knees." "Really? What'd she say?" 
She said, "Come on out from under the bed, you coward I" . . . 
If any of you have photos of yourself or showing some of the 
boys together, let us have them for publication. 

44lh PRECINCT: The handsome two boys are the offspring 
of Ptl. and Mrs. Edward Cantwell. John, age 6, and Richard, 
age 10, just awhile ago won the weekly first prize in the most 
beautiful children contest held by the newspaper "The Mirror." 
(With such grand looking kids how 
could you miss first prize in the grand 
iiM.ile.) . . . Best wishes and lots of good 
liuk to Sgt. McLaughlin and Patrolmen 
Alpert, Carr, Cullen and Mark upon 
ihcir promotion to new ranks, (Lt. and 
Sgts. respectively). . . . Kidding aside, 
the thing that threw the men of this 
j command off their feet was the sur- 
j prise mutual transfer of Lt. Bisland to 
j the 42nd Pet. (Their gain and our loss, 
I good luck.) . . . Work-Shop Rumors: 
Due to the influx of new men to our 
' command, Ptl. Salerno is considering 
Prize-winning Cantwells forming a BOCCI TEAM. All members 
of tliis command interested, see Sal. . . . Who are the two weak- 
eyed Yokums in Sector 3? . . . What member of A.W.S. is con- 
templating a transfer to the Mounted Division? The skipper's 
ankle is coming around in good shape and by the time the first 
robin arrives in town, he'll be able to take-on all comers in the 
department — in hand-ball that is. . . . Students : Consultations 
with the erudite members of the department disclose that the Manual 
of Procedure contains a large percentage of the answers to ques- 
tions asked in promotion examinations. We also learned that you 
do not have to know everything to be a sergeant. This is qualified 
by the warning that you cannot eliminate anything, either. . . . 
DiDjA Know That: "Melvin" Lifschitz is shoping along 167th 
Street, for a box of mustache wax. ... A little late, but we take 
this opportunity to express our happiness on the new assignment 
of Sgt. Fredrick Condon to Police Headquarters. This transfer 
was regretted by all of us here at the 44th. Always impartial, he 
was never too busy to listen to your side of the story and was 




alway.s rt-ady to lend his advice wtieii needed. We ui^ii iiiiii liie 
best of luck in his new assignment. ... A Must On Your List: 
Visit Ptl. Emil Hcidenlhalcr now confined to Kingsbridge Veterans 
Hospital. . . . And last but not least, it still looks as tliough no one 
ktiuws what that little black box under the bulletin board is for in 
the back room. 

48lh PRECINCT: The Fourth Annual Mass and Communion 
Breakfast of the 48th Precinct, held on Sunday, January 27, was 
attended by over 200 men. The group attended the 8 o'clock Mass 
at Saint Joseph's Church on Bathgate Avenue in the Bronx, and 
marched in a body to the Elks Club, Burnside Avenue and the 
Grand Concourse, for breakfast. Father John O'Hara, Chaplain of 
the 48th Precinct, offered the Mass. Guest .speakers were The Hon- 
orable Judge Vincent Tremarko, Colonel Delaney of the United 
States Army, and Father James Cox, son of Patrolmen James Cox, 
of the 48th Precinct chairman of the Arrangements Committee. 

52nd PRECINCT: Opening with the serious: We were all 
shocked and aggrieved over the sudden death of Ptl. Arthur Nealon 
by a sniper's bullet in the Korean conflict. Ptl. Nealon, formerly 
of the S2nd Pet., a captain of Company H, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 
of the 1st Cavalry Division was recalled to active duty on October 
3, 1950. Seldom does a citizen serve to the extent Artie did. He 
served this city as a policeman, this state as a trooper, and his 
country by sacrificing his life in a so-called "police action." During 
World War II, under Gen, "X'inegar Joe" Stillwell, he led an 
all-Chinese battalion in the China-Burma theatre, being awarded 
an official commendation by the Chinese Government. The Artie 
Nealon we knew was a quiet, unassuming man, tall hi stature, fun- 
loving, well-liked, never flaunting his experience, a good cop, a 
good husband and father, never known to complain about anything. 
On January 31, 1952, our Captain Quinn, five sergeants, and forty 
patrolmen voluntarily stood in rigid, silent tribute watching through 
misty eyes, choking back the tears as we reminisced the memorable 
tours with Artie, and realized that now he was forever gone 
from us. These are the rules and regulations of God-loving demo- 
cratic nations to stop the ruthless, violent encroachment of an 
atheistic nation. It became Ptl. Arthur Nealon's tour of expiration. 
He signed God's book. He was not merely one of New York's 
Finest, but one of the World's Finest. . . . Now that the sergeant's 
exam is over, what's your excuse? We can all make a resolution to 
start studying now so we can hit the next one for sure — instead of 
tackling the job three months before the e.xam. . , . Rumors at the 
Holy Name Communion Breakfast were that McF.ntee is No, 1 on 
the list with 99,99%, Simon is No, 2 with 99,88%, and levers is a 




POSING FOR THE CAMERAMAN on the occasion of the B'nai 
B'rith Brotherhood Award to Patrolman Gerald Moriarity of the 
52nd Precinct are: (Left to Right) Aaron J, Ballen, president of 
Gun Hill Lodge, B'nai B'rifh; Sixth Deputy Police Commissioner 
James B. Nolan; State Senator Nathaniel T, Hellman; Matilda 
Zitren, president Gun Hill Chapter, B'nai B'rith; Moriarity; and 
Captain John J. P. Quinn of the 52nd Precinct. 



— 34 — 



close third with 99.87%. Wlien the Kst is promulgated, remember 
you read it first in this column. . . . Incidentally, Ptl. levers re- 
cently had a previous "cause celebre" when his wife presented him 
with a bouncing baby boy after a short marriage of twelve j'ears. 
lever's long-sought-after formula, he claims, is a trip to Florida. 
So all ye childless fathers take note. 

On Thursday, February 14, Patrolman Gerald M. Moriarity of 
the S2nd was honored by a presentation of a Brotherhood Award 
by the B'nai B'rith Organization, Gun Hill Lodge No. 1789. The 
event was made a memorable one for Ptl. Moriarity by the presence 
of State Senator Nathaniel T. Helman and Sixth Deputy Police 
Commissioner James B. Nolan representing the Police Commis- 
sioner. "In the cause of brotherhood, by the promotion of good 
will amongst all groups, regardless of race, color or creed in the 
community" was the theme of the award. Such a person is Patrol- 
man Moriarity, who has dedicated himself to the furtherance of 
good understanding among all people especially children, through 
his activitj' in the Police Athletic League. This was the expressed 
sentiment of this commendable organization, the B'nai B'rith, at the 
Nathan Straus Jewish Center in presenting the Brotherhood Award 
to Ptl. Moriarity. Looking on with pride was Capt. John Quinn 
representing members of the 52nd Precinct. All members of the 
S2nd are proud of Gerald and we thank this great organization for 
bestowing such a noble award upon one of our members. This is 
democracy in action and we shout our praise, for let us not forget 
the 52nd Precinct was the birthplace of the Police Athletic League, 
and Ptl. Moriarity has worked hard to the furtherance of its prin- 
ciples — Well done, Gerry ! . . . We express our sorrow to the 
relatives of Ptl. John Culhane formerly of the 52nd and a member 
of the Hack Bureau, who died as a result of an operation. . . . Okay 
men, this column can be made more interesting by your contribu- 
tion of material and photographs you would like to see here. That 
blue box with the brass lettering in the sitting room is for your 
convenience and besides, we can't smoke all those cigar butts. 



BROOKLYN 



66th PRECINCT: Now that the sergeant's exam is over things 
are returning to normal. Al DeGiorgio went back to the Barbers' 
School; Les Doody is taking up a home decorating course; nostalgic 
thoughts of the Marine Corps are coming back to Bernie Baker; 
Dave Brosnan recounting stories of the different models he draws. 
Yes, the tension is gone. The books are put away until the next 
one. . . . Don't mention stray dogs to Buck Duane ! . . .Herbie Cul- 
len counting the days, and fellows like Paul Jones and Joe Farber 
wishing they were he. . . . Retirements come and go — but Bob 
Furey, Harry Senimig, Lenny Abbazia, Jim Riddle, and a few 
other "Old Timers" are still with us. Without them and fellows 
like Harold Grasman, Charlie Keenan, and Pensa, why this 01' 66 
just would not be the 66. God Bless 'em all ! ! . . . I hear tell that 
Martie Bergen of the 66th Squad is quite the handball player, but 
of course our own Jim Brander took care of that. Any of you 
fellows who want to lose some pounds, go see Eddie Campbell. . . . 
St. Patrick's Day alwaj'S did bring back memories and this last one 
was no exception: Remember Mike Horowitz mit the green tie j'et? 
Or the time they sewed the green heart on the Kid's pants ; or — • 
oh well, I gotta go — be seeing )-ou. 

84ih PRECINCT: Hear ye! Hear ye! This is to serve notice 
on all members of the 84th, that all cut-ups and capers, will be of 
great interest to your new reporter. ... A lot of water has passed 
under the bridge since the last time we were in print and yours 
truly will attempt to fill in the gap. . . . Belatedly, we heartily wel- 
come our new skipper. Captain John J. Moran. May your stay with 
us be a friendly and happy one. . . . The welcome mat is also out 
to Lieutenant Patrick Cline, Sergeants Henry Lagerway, James 
McLoughlin, Nicholas Trovato, William McGarry and all the new 
recruits. . . . We wish to bid farewell to Sgts. Francis Frontera, 
Harold Kearns and Carmine SantuUi. Also adieu to Patrolmen 
George Mullen, Harold Roder, Charlie Schultz, Bill Walsh and Joe 
Yost. Your retiring will be a loss to the manv friends vou left be- 




Qocev 

I 5EE THE SERQtBf^rS qftlMlrjq WltQHr fi^filN / 



hind. Good luck to you all and to each the best of happiness atid 
health. . . . Our congratulations to former Sgt. Kenneth Jones, now 
a looey in the 79th. We hope your supply of chocolate cakes never 
runs low. . . . Congrats are in order too, for George Simon now a 
three striper in the 76th. ... To the many men in our command 
who have acquired a little deduction — a hearty handshake — also need 
we say, well done? . . . And we, who have crossed this milestone 
in life before you, know that a 2 A.M. ring is much easier to accom- 
plish than a 2 A.M. bottle. . . . The drilling and marching executed 
by the Auxiliary Police is something to behold. All due credits to 
those in Civil Defense. . . . The recent demonstration of an Atomic 
Disaster, staged within our command, was highly successful due to 
the know-how of the civilian volunteers and their capable instruc- 
tors. It proved that knowing what to do at the right time, can save 
many a life. The Bell Telephone Company had its motion picture 
department film the incident for future pictorial training of Civil 
Defense forces. Our two most promising "haras," Prendergast and 
Quigley, who played minor roles in the production, are now negotiat- 
ing for Hollywood contracts. ... To Jimmy Meehan, who took the 
fatal step — may all your troubles be "little ones." . . . Rumors have 
it that Piotrowski is seeking a mate. We presume that newlywed 
Joe Salmieri is directly responsible for his predicament. . . . 'Tis 
said hereabout, that the "Olive Oil" tw'ins, Castelli and Cofone, 
have something in common. Both love fish ; namely baccala. Huh ? 
. . . Murphj' and Jimmy Neilson had recent heir rivals. . . . Ditto 
Sgt. McGarry. ... Is it true that the team of Sweeney and Zim- 
mer have the best record for recovering stolen vehicles? . . . The 
Day Squad has taken under its wings, "Rookies" Murphy, Spinelli 
and Zimmerman. . . . Didja know that the Day Squad totals over 
328 years in service? . . . That perpetual smile of Sweeney's dis- 
appeared, when he saw the shape his car was in after another car 
struck it. ... A hurry-up and get well to Patrolmen Molini, 
Wollkof, Saylor, Murphy, Lentini and Cramer. . . . Welsch is now 
taking piccolo lessons and discarding his piano. . . . Hats off to 
Murphy, Signorile and Surbrug for their recent departmental 
recognition. . . . Advice to Giovanniello, whose hair is turning gray 
and thinning at the temples. Try Antel's Formula No. 9. . . . McCall, 
the pigeon fancier, bragging again about his "racers." Something 
will have to be done to silence him. . . . Sincere condolences to 
Captain Moran upon the death of his father-in-law; to Patrolmen 
Albert, Dammeyer and Hamill upon the deaths of their fathers. . . . 
Proud are the men of the 84th, for our station house is acclaimed 
one of the city's cleanest, both inside and out. . . . Attendants please 
take your bows ! . . . And to all of you men who took the recent 
sergeant's exam, may those three stripes you have been dreaming 
about, become a realitv ! 



— 35 



LOOKING 'EM OVER-fConf,n„.dj 



QUEENS 

102nd PRECINCT: Our heartfelt condolences to Ptl. James 
Wallace on the loss of his beloved father and to Ptl. John Kane on 
the loss of his beloved mother. . . . During the month of March, 
we lost two old timers via retirement, B. J. Maguire and Leonard 
Brandenberger — the latter due to the new age clause and the former 
because he has had enough of St. Patrick parades. . . . Hackford, 
Jaeger and Minasi have reached the two year mark and gladly wel- 
come the pay addition. . . . Dct. Rickard 102nd Sqd., received a 
Commendation for the splendid job he did on the stamp racket 
gang. Congratulations, Walt. . . . Anthony Burke and Charlie Hun- 
ter have announced new arrivals at home, both boys. Congratula- 
tions ! Where are the cigars ? Belated Congrats to Frank Owens 
and Mrs. Owens, also a boy. Am I forgiven Mrs. O? Now per- 
haps Frank can enter the house without being hit over the head 
with each new edition of SPRING 3100. . . . Charlie Rogers is 
unaccustomed to the Day Squad Chart. He reported to work on 
his Saturday off. ... Is Garlich slipping? . . . Sgt. Gribbon misses 
his fishing partner, Wni. Eller, who is recuperating from a severe 
ailment. It won't be long before these two demons of the sea relate 
their fantastic and adventurous fish stories to the boys in the back 
room. . . . Coui.D It Be the Books? Charlie Murawski, after 
completing a tour, leaving the S.H. in civvies and police cap. . . . Ray 
Stone, the latest to go, endeavoring to solve the mystery of Tierney's 
two missing rolls, came up with the solution that he was the culprit. 
He ate the rolls instead of crackers that he purchased for himself. 
. . . Who said, "I cannot absorb any more knowledge. I know 
everything there is to know?" . . . Notice John Guido's picture in 
last month's edition of SPRING 3100. That guy is everywhere. . . . 
Scully is priming Artie Neu. . . . Ernie Schmid collared a boy for 
throwing a snowball at his car and quoted the book to him, word 
for word. . . . Angelo Maltaghati was more than lucky to walk 
away from the recent crack up he had. Latest reports tend to show 
a broken collar bone. . . . Bill McDonald was also lucky to avoid 
serious injury when a crack-pot tried to run him down with his car. 
. . . Ptl. Fauls has a new assignment. He is the official coal weigher 
of the 102nd. . . . Tom Fauls wants to know why Sgt. G. calls him 
a shrimp, when he himself is an oversized midget. Fauls boasts 
that he can eat cabbage off the Sgt.'s head. . . . Who is loose with 
a deuce? . . . All should know, by the time this issue goes to press, 
how they fared in the Sgt. exam. Were our predictions correct? 
Who are the top three men? Have any of the five R's, Rope, 
Roof, Revolver, River and Razor, been reported? . . . You Dope 
It Out — Our clerical office boasts of two ex-top Sgts. Joe Maier, 
Marines and Fred Sheer, Army. Now Toe had more time in the 
service than Fred, but Fred has more time in the P.D. than Joe. 
So who is the lop kick of the clerical office? Does Joe keep Fred 
hopping or vice versa? . . . Wish to know any new developments 
in the P. D. or the latest incidents involving its personnel, then see 
"First Hand News" Charlie Christen. 



OTHER UNITS 

BUREAU OF POUCEWOMEN. Hi, everybody Well, then, 

Hi . . . both you readers! Missed the deadline last month, but 
here's a long one to make up for it. . . . We say farewell, with our 
fingers crossed, to fourteen of our old-timers, who were retired on 
orders. We cross our fingers because there is still a chance as this is 
written that they may be reinstated which would be a happy thing, 
because each one is a good cop, and we could use their knowledge 
and experience to good advantage. We also cross our fingers be- 
cause the farewell does not mean that they arc leaving us in a real 
sense. If they are successful with their fight, we'll be working 
with them again. But in any case, they will still be close friends, 
and members of our "family." So — good luck in every way to 
Helena Brady, Lizzie Burke, Bertha Conwell, Margaret Evans, 
Emma Gross, Lillian Harrison, Katharyn Kalish, Ann Kauff, 
Mamie McAllister, Barbara Popken, Katherine Relyea, Delia 
Schaible, Mary Sullivan No. 119 and Mary Sullivan No. 34. The 
law under which these women were retired, by the way, does not 



apply lu Madeline O'Neill, as she is not a member of any pension 
system. . . . Our girls continue to show what good cops they are, 
by getting mentioned in Orders. After a Meritorious Police Duty 
on November 19, Laurette McDonnell received another one on 
Januao' 21. Kay Barry also received a Meritorious Police Duty 
on November 19 and two more in the orders of January 21. Robbie 
Williams got a Commendation in the January orders for good work 
in nabbing twenty-one members of a narcotics ring. Those gals 
in Narcotics will have to wear their shields lower when in uniform 
to leave room for all those medals. Personally, I think we should 
all be pretty proud of them. They reflect credit not only on them- 
selves, but on every woman in the job! Congrats, gals! . . . "Rob- 
bie" Robinson is recuperating at a V.A. Hospital upstate as tliis is 
written. C'mon back, kid, we're saving all your work for you ! . . . 
Sympathy to "Jerry" Goldman on the loss of her mother, to Kay 
Wynne on the loss of one of her new twins, and to Helen Landers 
whose father passed away. Would like to say some word of com- 
fort, but am at a loss for words in that regard. . . . Probationary 
Margaret Easton resigned January 6. Well, good luck. Everyone to 
her own taste . . . Welcome to new girls Lucy Napoli, Mary Mc- 
Donnell and Eileen Romanchuk (whom we welcomed once before. 
This time for keeps, we hope), who were appointed January 12th. 
. . . Congratulations to Doris McDonald on her new shield as of 
January 4. That's starting the New Year right! . . . Ruth Kaplan 
was transferred to BHME on Januarys 10. Good luck to you, 
too. . . . Margaret Hayes, Katherine McKenna and Gertrude Watt 
finished probation last December 15 and are now able to stop worry- 
ing about those six tantalizing months. . . . The class of February 
1949 is now on full pay, and celebrated with a ditmer at the Cres- 
cent Restaurant in Brooklyn on January 31. The class has two late 
starters, Helen Landers and Ruth Billings, who were appointed on 
February 28. If they had been appointed on the 29th, would they 
have to wait twelve years to get full pay? Well, of course 1949 
wasn't leap year, but I mean if it had been. And how could they 
say a cop was over sixty-three years old if he or she had only 
celebrated sixteen birthdays? All right, how silly can you get? 
Keep an eye on me ! Who celebrates a birthday after they're about 
twenty-five, anyway? . . . Since Dot North changed her name to 
Payne, we now have two Dorothy Paynes in the job. How Con- 
fucius ! . . . Ida Frimet marries on March 30, the day after the 
sergeant's exam. I don't know why she set that date. Suppose he 
doesn't make it, wouldn't she marry him anyway? Or is it just 
so he can study hard until then ? . . . Regina CuUey's boy scaled in at ten 
pounds and six ounces. What a fighting weight ! . . . Mary Murphy's 
boy weighed in at nine pounds and lots of bounces. . . . Pauline Olm- 
stead, Emily Ottavino and Betty Fuller are on the "Stork's Order List." 
Marie Doyle may have been visited by the time this goes to press, as 
well as Ceil Fields. . . . Vera Franolich married on February 17 and is 
now Mrs. Don Brannon, honeymooning in "Romantic New Orleans." 
(But then, any place is romantic when you're honeymooning. Oh, 
well, maybe some day my "Prints" will come. It IS Leap Year!) 
. . . The Policewomen's Endowment Association held its installa- 
tion dinner at Fraunces Tavern on Jannuary 22. Thanks to Julia 
Antonelli who did a swell job arranging it. Dct. Moira McDermott 
(Continued on page 39) 



CONSOLIDATION OF AMENDMENTS 

Pages 85 and 86 of the Manual of Procedure hove 
been amended frequently. To reduce the number of loose 
inserts in the Manual, SPRING 3100 has consolidated all 
of the changes and additions (up to and including No- 
vember 16, 1951) ofFecting these two pages into (wo new 
sheets which can be used to replace the original sheet 
and all of the inserts amending the paragraphs thereon. 
The replacement sheets follow on the next two pages. 

NOTE: In the omendment to Subdivision h. Paragraph 14 of Article 
5 oppeoring in the March issue, the word "not" wos omitted from 
the lost line. Corrected amendment will be included next month. 



— 36 — 






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LOOKING 'EM OVER-fConfinu.d; 



made a fine Mistress of Ceremonies. Officers were installed by 
Police Commissioner Monaghan, There were thirty-one guests ; and 
his Honor, Mayor Impellitteri addressed the assemblage. Mrs. 
Ann Fenety, honorary P.E.A. member, presented the association 
with an American Flag to match the P.E.A. banner which she pre- 
viously gave us. . . . The P.E.A. spring entertainment and dance 
will be held in Manhattan Center, in the Grand Ballroom — (upstairs; 
not the ground floor "Promenade.") We had to get a larger place 
than we had last year. The great day will be Thursday, May 15, 
(Payday!) and tickets are now available. The Entertainment Com- 
mittee is working hard, dancers and singers rehearsing like mad, 
and we hope to have a fine show by the girls. Tables will be re- 
served without extra charge, but no reservations can be made until 
ten tickets are paid for, so it's first come first served on that point. 
However, there will be more tables this year, so don't get panicky — 
but don't wait till the last minute either. The poster committee will 
welcome any artistic talent you may have. Even if you haven't any, 
your time and effort will be put to good use. See Grace Kuhls for 
that. Be sure to get all your friends and relatives to come, they'll 
get their money's worth. That's for sure. And we have to get a 
large turnout to make a profit on all the hard work and time that 
the various members are giving so freely. . . . Well, it's been a 
long column, and the editor wants some rest, so g'bye a while. 

DIVISION OF LICENSES: Reporter's Note: All right fellas, 
I S.\ID I was sorry we missed tlie column last month, but I was 
very busy flirting with pneumonia, and spent a couple of weeks in 
bed with a doctor. So THERE ! . . . Now to settle down to some 
unfinislied business ! The members of this entire command are 
proud and happy to extend their sincere and heartiest congratula- 
tions to our commanding officer. Assistant Chief Inspector Thomas 
¥. Berkery, recently promoted to that top rank ! ! ! Asst. Chief 
Berkery came to this command in 1927 as a lieutenant and has con- 
tinuously run this very busy and important division in an efficient 
maimer. He is well deserving of all the praise Commissioner 
Monaghan bestowed on him. We wish him many more years of 
continued success with a good measure of health and happiness. 
And may God's richest blessings be given to him and his wonderful 
family. . . . We also extend congratulations to Lt. Bill Touwsma 
who now wears an A/Capt. shield, but who may soon be wearing 
a FULL captain's shield, when the captain's list comes out ! . . . 
We were sorry to lose Ptl. Freddie Brooks, but we are happy about 
his transfer to THE BUREAU, after some excellent police work. 
. . . Lt. Andy Leddy, CO. of our Pistol Bureau, which also used 
to issue Religious Permits before that court decision, really has his 
hands full. A few weeks ago, a very young couple came to his 
office with a Civil Ceremony Marriage Certificate and wanted Andy 
to give them his blessing by performing a religious ceremony. Poor 
guy ! No wonder he has ulcers ! . . . Sgt. Arthur Millon back at 
his desk after a very long illness. We hope he is fully recovered, 
and wish him continued good health. . . . We also welcome back 
Civ. Bill Brennan who likewise had a rough siege. . . . And to all 
those nice people who sent me get well wishes during my own ill- 
ness, please accept my sincere thanks. Gee, I (jOtta Lotta Friends ! 
. . . Speaking of friends, I tliink we all have a mutual friend in 
the person of Mike O'Brien, reporter for the Daily News' "KingS 
and Queens" column. In his own inimitable way, Mr. O'Brien 
has come to the aid of many city departments, but I think he 
has a soft spot in that BIG IRISH heart of his especially for this 
department. We thank him for the many nice things he has said 
about us, and on behalf of ALL the HELLO Girls in the Dept., I 
wish to thank him tor the nice plug he gave us on a promotion 
examination to be held soon. . . . While we're on the subject of 
promotions, we wish ALL the would-be sergeants the best of luck 
on their exam ! And if you didn't make the grade, just remem- 
ber your three R's. ROPE! RIVER! or REVOLVER! ! Good 
luck, boys ! . . . Congratulations to our new fourth grade clerks : 
Mortie Harris, Irving Bergerman, Max Pasternack and Bertha Bes- 
manoff. . . . Fourth grade, yet ! And they won't let us be second 
grade operators ! There ain't no justice ! . . . Did you know that 
Ret. Ptl. Ed Smith is a pretty sick fella? It would be nice if some 
of us old-timers could find time to drop him a cheery note now and 



then. Contact Dick McMahon or me, and we'll be glad to give 
you his home address. Meanwhile Ed, we wish you better health 
and hope you'll be well enough real soon to come and pay us one 
of those nice visits. . . . Also a very speedy recovery to Ptl. Gil 
McCall's young lad who is in the hospital battling with pneumonia. 
. . . Our sincere sympathy to Ptl. Joe Simowitz and Jimmy Linden 
in the loss of their dear fathers and also to Ret. Ptl. Bill Bandon 
in the loss of his mother. Bill had to fly to St. Louis for his 
mother's funeral. Sudden losses are always hard to take, and it 
reminds me of some true words I learned at my last Mission. LAfe 
is short but death is sure; and the hour of death remains obscure, 
etc., etc. If we only knew when, eh? ... A grim reminder; If 
you have any money left over after paying Uncle Harry, don't 
forget there's Uncle Tom Dewey waiting for it ! . . . Suggestion 
for the suggestion box ! Would it be possible to print some sort 
of official directory of our top ranking commanding officers in 
SPRING 3100 from time to time? Seems to me, every time I have 
to locate somebody, they've either moved or retired! (It would 
really be a big help until the new issues of the Official Roster are 
printed!) . . . P.S. We have another reader! Sgt. McDonough's 
young daughter, Joan, bawls him out if he doesn't bring the 
SPRING 3100 home on time every month! Could it be she wants 
to follow in her daddy's footsteps? 



To Our Readers 

Each month, SPRING 3100 publishes an original 
story written by some member of the department. 
We also try to include within our pages as many 
original cartoons as space will allow. 

To encourage this literary and artistic efFort within 
the department, the editor awards a monthly prize 
of $25.00 for each short story that is published and 
a prize of $5.00 for each cartoon used. 

SHORT STORY — Stories should be typewritten, 
double spaced using one side of the page. Any 
subject may be submitted but those concerning police- 
men and their activities have a greater appeal to 
our readers. Stories should be between 1,000 
words and 1,500 words in length. 

CARTOONS — For best reproduction, drawings 
should be done in block drawing ink on white card- 
board, eight inches square. 

All manuscripts and drawings should be addressed 
to: THE EDITOR, SPRING 3100, 400 BROOME STREET, 
NEW YORK 13, N. Y. 



/"V 




CjEE, An6 He Jv.T LffT fovi A HuNTlNL IriO In Ihi" MouNTAINS " 



39 — 



i?rtES^lXM 














IN SERVICE 










Nome 


Appain 


ed 




Command 




Died 




Sgt. Robert L. Alperin 


Dec. 


30, 


1921 




Har. Pet. 


Feb. 


12, 


1952 


Sgt. James C. Manning 


Jan. 


26, 


1927 




71st Pet. 


Feb. 


14, 


1952 


Sgt. Kenneth J. King 


June 


20, 


1937 




74th Pet. 


Feb. 


23, 


1952 


Sgt. Paul E. Brooks 


Mar. 


26, 


1938 




G.C.P. Pet. 


Feb. 


28, 


1952 


Ptl. John J. Johnston 


Oct. 


14, 


1930 




92nd Pet. 


Feb. 


19, 


1952 


PtI. James J. Baynes 


Dec. 


12, 


1945 




Har. Pet. 


Feb. 


21, 


1952 


Ptl. Thomas A. O'Dea 


May 


2, 


1927 




Trof. D 


Feb. 


24, 


1952 


Ptl. Robert E. Hamill 


Nov. 


1 


1926 




13th Pet. 


Feb. 


28, 


1952 


Ptl. John F. Cempa 


Jan. 


10, 


1927 




Traf. L 


Mar. 


1, 


1952 


Ptl. Jot 


in Collins 


July 


1, 


1938 




7th D.D. 


Mar. 


5, 


1952 



Capt. Brooks Gulager May 24, 1905 

Sgt. Patrick L. Donovan Dee. 24, 1887 

Sgt. James Gibbons Feb. 18, 1891 

Ptl. Christopher J. Walsh Mar. 22, 1929 

Ptl. Bernard Vogt Apr. 5, 1923 

Ptl. John F. Herrity Jan. 26, 1927 

Ptl. Patrick Feeley Sept. 7, 1928 

Ptl. Edward F. Hughes Dec. 3, 1896 

Ptl. William L. Harris Oct. 16, 1923 

Ptl. John Demolea Sept. 25, 1930 

Ptl. William E. O'Connor July 27, 1910 

Ptl. Charles E. Carlton Aug. 12, 1903 

Ptl. Joseph W. Forsythe Dec. 19, 1923 

Ptl. Casimere Kunz Aug. 2, 1906 

Ptl. Patrick J. McArevey Oct. 12, 1897 

Ptl. William H. Fischer Oct. 19, 1925 

Ptl. Joseph H. Lang June 22, 1925 

Ptl. Harold Hahn Aug. 27, 1925 

Ptl. Daniel F. Sullivan June 15, 1909 

Ptl. Richard V. Welsh Nov. 21, 1918 

Ptl. Henry S. Lott Mar. 27, 1907,. 

Ptl. Michael Kiley Oct. 14, 1930.. 

Ptl. Thomas Manning July 29, 1904 

Ptl. Patrick J. Murray Nov. 6, 1897 



RETIRED 

Retired on 

Dee. 16, 1937 122nd Pet. 

Apr. 14, 1909 Old 29th Pet. 

Mar. 26, 1912 Old 165th Pet. 

Oct. 16, 1943 88th Pet. 

June 15, 1943 104th Pet. 

Jan. 26, 1947 79th Pet. 

Sept. 15, 1948 75th Pet. 

Jan. 20, 1912 Old 290th Pet. 

Jan. 31, 1944 20th Pet. 

Oct. 14, 1950 110th Pet. 

July 17, 1946 1st Pet. 

Aug. 20, 1928 74th Pet. 

Feb. 9, 1945 Av. Bur. 

Apr. 30, 1936 8th Pet. 

Sept. 7, 1923 Traf. A 

Aug. 16, 1943 114th Pet. 

Oct. 20, 1942 103rd Pet. 

Aug. 27, 1945 Mtd. Sqdn. 1 

Sept. 30, 1951 Traf. D 

Jan. 31, 1944 44th Pet. 

Sept. 22, 1942 75th Pet. 

Dec. 31, 1949 79th Pet. 

Dec. 16, 1932 4th Pet. 

Nov. 6, 1922 Old 49th Pet. 



Jan. 


7, 


1952 


Feb. 


2, 


1952 


Feb. 


27, 


1952 


Feb. 


2, 


1952 


Feb. 


4, 


1952 


Feb. 


6, 


1952 


Feb. 


8, 


1952 


Feb. 


8, 


1952 


Feb. 


9, 


1952 


Feb. 


9, 


1952 


Feb. 


11, 


1952 


Feb. 


12, 


1952 


Feb. 


13, 


1952 


Feb. 


17, 


1952 


Feb. 


20, 


1952 


Feb. 


20, 


1952 


Feb. 


22, 


1952 


Feb. 


23, 


1952 


Feb. 


27, 


1952 


Feb. 


27, 


1952 


Mar. 


4, 


1952 


Mar. 


4, 


1952 


Mar. 


4, 


1952 


Mar. 


4, 


1952 



— 40 — 



WW AN f tUl Information leading to the 

SOLUTION OF ARNOLD SCHUSTER S KILLING 



THIS space was formerly occupied by the wanted notice for 
Willie Sutton. He was captured on February 18. On March 8 
at 9:10 P.M., Arnold Schuster, 24 years, of 941 45th Street, Brook- 
lyn, who supplied the original tip which led to Sutton's arrest, was 
shot and killed. His assailant fired four bullets into his body, as 
Schuster walked along a darkened sidewalk in the direction of 
his home. The body was found at the entrance of an alleyway 
alongside 913 45th Street. 

Characterizing the crime as the "cruelest, most cold-blooded 
killing" in his long experience as a law enforcer. Police Commis- 
sioner George P. Monaghan has promised major departmental 
recognition to members of the force uncovering clues leading to 
the capture of the slayer or slayers. 

In addition, the Board of Estimate through the Mayor has ac- 
ceded to the Police Commissioner's request to post a $25,000 
reward for the apprehension or for information leading to the 
opprehension and conviction of the persons having any connection 
with the crime. The Patrolmen's Benevolent Association has added 



its resources to the manhunt of offering $1,000 reward for the cap- 
ture of the killer or killers. Several newspapers and a radio station 
hove made additional offers totaling $12,000. 




Officers of the P.B.A. turn over to the department the association's reworcJ 

offer, left to right. Patrolman Richard Sullivan, Chief Inspector Rothengast, 

Police Commissioner Monaghan accepting the check from President John Carton, 

and Patrolmon Mario Biaggi. 



$26,000 REWARD -WORLD'S FAIR BOMB EXPLOSION 



The Board of Estimate of the City of New York unanimously 
voted to appropriate $25,000 reward and the Detectives' Endowment 
Association of the Police Department, City of New York, has voted 
$1,000 reward for the apprehension, or for information leading to 
the apprehension and conviction of the individual or individuals, or 
organizations, that placed, or had any connection with placing, an 
infernal machine or bomb in the British Pavilion at the World's Fair, 
which, after being carried from the Pavilion to a vacant part of the 
Fair Grounds by members of this Department, exploded on Thursday, 
July 4, 1940, at about 4:40 p.m., causing the death of two detectives 
and injuries to other detectives. 



All information and the identity of persons furnishing it will 
be kept strictly confidential, and if the informant is not required as 
an essential witness and he so desires, the source of the information 
will not be disclosed. 

Persons having information should communicate in jierson or by 
telephone with Chief of Detectives' Office. Police Headquarters, 
Manhattan, 240 Centre Street, Telephone CAnal 6-2000. 

If more than one person is entitled to the reward, it will be pro- 
portionately distributed, and the Police Commissioner shall be the 
sole judge as to its distribution. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1940 
Age 22 



Homicide 

John Guisfo- White; age 33 years; height, S 
feet, 8 inches; weight 170 pounds; blue eyes; 
brown hair; wanted for homicide of Wil- 
liam Lurje, who was stabbed to death on June 
21, 1949 at 224 W. 35th Street, N.Y.C. He has 
been indicted by New York County Grand Jury 
and a bench warrant has been issued. Accomp- 
lice in this crime, Benedict Macri, surrendered 
to authorities on June 18, 1950. A $25,000.00 
reward has been offered by the International 
Ladies' Garment Workers Union for the arrest 
and conviction of the killers of William Lurye. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1946 
Age 22 



Homicide 

McKlnley Seals — alias Dukey — Age 27 

years; height, 5 feet, 6 inches; weight, 135 
pounds ; maroon eyes ; black hair ; occupation, 
machine operator. He is wanted for shooting 
and killing Jerville Goodman on April 11, 1947. 
He has been indicted and bench warrant has 
been issued. 



Homicide and Felonious Assault 

Salverio Lopes Lagoeiro — alias Salverio 
Lopes Da Silva — .Age 55 years; height 5 feel, 
11;4 inches; weight 190 pounds; dark brown 
eyes and hair ; dark complexion ; scar under- 
neath chin ; pit mark over left eye ; a Portu- 
guese; occupation, a longshoreman; He is 
wanted for the shooting and killing of Josepli 
J. Serria, and shooting and wounding Felix 
Longo on board a barge at Pier 15, East River, 
New York, on November 14, 1941. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1941 
Age 45 



Homicide 

Oc McLeod - .Age 43 ; height 5 feet, 6)^ 
inches; weight 138 pounds; brown eyes; black 
hair. He is wanted in connection with the 
perpetration of a homicide by stabbing, at 
Far Rockaway, Queens on August 1, 1951. 




PHOTO TAKEN 1948 
Age 40 



Members of the Force who ore successful in the apprehension of any person described on this page or who may obtain infermatien which 

will lead to his arrest will receive Departmental Recognition. 

GEORGE P. MONAGHAN, Po//ce Comm/ss/oner 





A MAGAZINE FOR POLICEMEN 

Published by 

POLICE DEPARTMENT CITY OF NEW YORK 

George P. Monaghan, Commissioner 



J 


^1 






1 





-# 



0' 




MAY 



19 5 2 





Vol. 23 



No. 5 



FRANK FRISTENSKY, JR. 

Rrif Deputy Commitsianer 



PtI. Joseph A. Callahan 

Polw. Yeffa Cohn 

PtI. Thomas P. Connors 



A IMAGAZINE FOR POLHEMLN 



FRANK D. DOYLE 

Secretary of the Department, Editor 

CONRAD H. ROTHENGAST 

Chief Inspector 

EDITORIAL STAFF 
Sgt. William M. Hambrecht 



JAMES Mcelroy 

Chief of StafF 



PtI. Joseph Gongi 
Det. James W. Magner 
PtI. Gerald Walsh 



In This Issue 

Poge 

THEY STILL BUY GOLD BRICKS 2 

NEWSPAPER AWARDS 7 

MEMORANDA '..'~| 7 

PROMOTIONS ' ~~Z~~Z 8 

AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS ".""'" 10 

TOP COMMAND )5 

ALL IN THE DAY'S WORK 16 

NEW ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION TECHNIQUE 19 
THE END OF TIME-SHORT STORY 20 

RETIREMENTS 22 

DOWN THE LINE ZZ'...." 23 

STUDY HALL "~Z 28 

BROWSING IN THE LIBRARY ...1 29 

LOOKING EM OVER 30-31-32-33-34-35-36-37-39 

AMENDMENTS 37J8 

IN MEMORIAM 40 

NOTICE 

"MEMORANDA" usually found on this page 
will be found on page 7 of this issue because 
it is felt thot the lengthy letters published will be 
of interest to all. 

PRECINCT REPORTERS 

PtI. Robert Wille (1st Pet.),- PtI. Michael C. Zopf 
'3rd Pet.); PtI. Nicholas J. Perrino (13th Pet.); PtL 
Charles F. Sullivon, Jr. (22nd Pet.); PtI. Anthony 
J. Lojacono (23rd Pet.); PtI. John Peller (25th Pet.); 
PtI. Raymond R. Wieboldt (28th Pet.); PtI. Ben- 
jamin T. Fishman (42nd Pet.); PtI. Don Crowley 
and PtI. Gene Loewy (43rd Pet.); PtI. E. A. Gray 
52nd Pet.); PtI. Peter Locatelli (66th Pet.); PtI. 
Nathon Brief (80th Pet.); PtL Nicholas Rivono (84th 
Pel.); PtI. Henry D. Ulrich (88th Pet.); PtI. Nicholas 
Porpon (102nd Pet.); PtI. Walter C. Shad (Traffic 
A.); Det. Addie Knowles (PWB); Mros. Rose Lupo 
(Div. of Licenses). 



FRONT COVER 

LIFE SAVING. Under the expert 
guidance of a representative of the 
American Red Cross, probationary 
patrolmen are instructed In the 
newest technique of artificial resuci- 
tation, the Holgar Nielson method 
described on page 19. 

(Photograph by Det. James Magner, 
Bureau of Public Relations.) 



Published by the Police Department, 

City of New York. 

Copyright, 1952, by the Police Department, 

City of New York. 

No part of this publication may be reproduced 

in whole or in part without written permission 

from the editor. 

Address all communications to SPRING 3100, 

400 Broome Street, New York 13, N. Y. 



Letters 



Thinks We're Open-Minded 



Dear Sir: 

I sent in a suggestion to you regarding the 
change in layout of the "In Memoriam" page. It 
makes me feel as if I'm part of the magazine 
when I see a suggestion of mine put into being. 
So many organizations and people seem to hove 
the attitude that no one knows anything but them- 
selves. I'm happy to see that my suggestion 
wasn't "canned." 

The fact that members of the force con write 
to someone (not through official channels) who 
might take a sympathetic view of suggestions and 
ideas for improving the job is a good thing. We 
have a good job, but like all jobs it is open to 
improvement. 

Right now SPRING 3100 gives $25 for the best 

short story submitted and $5 for cartoons printed. 
As you may know, various corporations and some 
city governments offer cash bonuses to employees 
who suggest ways and means to save time or 
expense, or improve working conditions. I believe 
that instead of getting an Excellent Police Duty, 
as prescribed in Rule 310, for a suggestion or a 
method thot increases department efficiency, cosh 
bonuses ought to be paid to members responsible 
for recommending worthwhile Improvements. 

I'm sure that there ore many men with good 
workable ideas and devices thot would enable us 
to do a better job and would also promote our 
safety. All that they need is something to make 
them come forward and I think that a monthly 
cash award of $25 would accomplish this. Don't 
you think that the Chief Inspector would approve 
something along the lines suggested? Everybody 
seems to take the attitude "Let George do it." 
Maybe my idea would change this. 

I hove no angle behind this letter other than 
to see some changes for the better made. I am 
writing to you because I think that SPRING 3100 
is the best medium through which such changes 
can be brought about. 

A PATROLMAN. 

(Editor's Note: This letter was received two weefcs 
prior to the publication by the daily press on 
April 7 of the Mayor's plan to institute cosh 
awards for ideas submitied by city employees.) 



Errant Copies ... A Clerical 
Man's View 

Dear Sir: 

On the back of the front cover of this month's 
issue, April 1952, you hove a letter from a potrol- 
man, also on editor's note relative to errant 
copies. On the face of it both comments are 
quite justified and sound like good suggestions, 
but please publish the other side of the story, 



Relative to writing names on each mogazlne, 
when am I going to get the time to do it? I om 
a clerical patrolman with over 100 members in 
the command. Each fifteen days I must open over 
a hundred envelopes, check the House Tax and 
forward the money through chonnels. Of this 
hundred, I must sit down and write notifications 
to over thirty that they hove failed to pay their 
tox on time. Therefore I must either "snitch" to 
the captain, or lay the money out myself, or try 
to send notificotions to all of the thirty at their 
homes to report forthwith to the stotion house and 
pay. You can easily see which of the three 
choices is the easiest. 

The second fifteen days sees a repeat of the 
above with the exception that this time it is the 
Blue Cross, and those who fait to pay must be 
listed. In between these fifteen-day jobs there 
ore booklets for distribution to every member of 
the command. It moy be: Warden's Manual for 
Civilian Defense; Guide for Self-help and Neigh- 
bor help for the injured; H.I. P.; Blue Cross-Blue 
Shield increase in rotes; or It may be "Who wants 
to vote in the coming Primary?" 

If the patrolman wonts his magazine personally 
distributed him, let him get after his brother offi- 
cers to coop^ote with his precinct clerical patrol- 
man. For the post eight months, I hove taken the 
magazines and written a man's name on each 
copy. Then at roll-call time, I distributed the 
copies to the men and olso placed a sign on the 
bulletin board reading "MAGAZINE SPRING 3100 
NOW AVAILABLE IN CLERICAL OFFICE." Do you 
know Mr. Editor thot I hove hod as many as 
fifteen copies lying in my desk for the whole 
month belonging to various members who were 
too lazy to walk twenty-five feet to my office and 
ask for the magazine. Simple justice also dictates 
that something be said to the patrolmen con- 
cerned to practice a little common courtesy, good 
manners and consideration. 

In oil seriousness, I agree with the complaining 
patrolman that it is unfoir for anyone to take 
one copy for home, one to cut up for the Manual 
and a third for some friend. But I am also seri- 
ous in stating that no clerical patrolman is in- 
spired to do any extra work for the patrol force 
when he knows in advance that many of them 
will not even avail themselves of this service. 

I would suggest that the magazine be delivered 
a day before the checks and let it be understood 
that they will be put out on payday ond each 
member os he colls for his check con request his 
copy. Or he con moke arrangements with one 
of the members of his squad to pick up his copy 
or let him coll the station house and request some 
member to put his copy oside. In other word 
LET THE OFFICER HIMSELF SHOW HIS WILLING- 
NESS TO HELP HIMSELF before asking others to 
woit on him. 

A CLERICAL PATROLMAN 



Inflation Has Caught Up With SPRING 3100 



FOR more than five years, the price of SPRING 3100 has remained unchanged. 
The last price increase occurred in January 1947. It is no secret that during 
this period costs have skyrocketed. 

In the publication field, printing wages have increased by about forty per cent 
and the cost of paper has gone up almost fifty per cent. The prices of almost every 
magazine have been increased to reflect these advances. Popular monthlies and 
weeklies, like Cosmopolitan and the Saturday Evening Post, now charge fifty per 
cent more than they did five years ago last January. 

SPRING 3100 is dependent solely upon sales to its readers and has no ad- 
vertising revenue. In recognition of these facts, the printing company has held 
oflf as long as it could in passing the increased labor and material costs on to us. 
But the problem can no longer be temporized. Our printing bill is about to rise 
and a price increase is inevitable. 

We regret that we must add to the financial burden of our readers at a time 
when the ink is barely dry on the new city budget which grants the members of 
the Police Department a salary increase to ofifset their reduced earning poWer as 
represented by 1939 standards. Yet the inflation spiral seems to climb ever up- 
ward and we are caught in it. 

In the very near future, the price of SPRING 3100 will have to be increased. 
However, because all possibilities of efl^ecting savings are now being fully explored, 
the exact amount of the increase cannot be announced by the time this issue goes 
to press. When the studies are completed, you may be certain that the new rates 
will be consistent with our policy of producing the best possible magazine at the 
lowest possible cost. For those who subscribe annually by mail, the increase will not 
become efl:'ective until the renewal date. 

We sincerely trust that our readers will appreciate that this step is forced 
upon us by economic circumstances and that an expression of confidence in tliis 
magazine, dedicated as it is to the interests of your profession, will be reflected 
in continued support and cooperation. 

The Cif/tcf 



^Uedf iilU Luif 



\ 




.^^^:^^^^:i^i^^^^;^^<^<^-;>^>^^^^ 




Con Men Do A Rush 



Business in Gotham 



WHEX we hear stories of people 
purchasing gold bricks, we 
immediately envision some 
country bumpkin being taken in by a 
smooth-talking city slicker, and most 
of us are a little skeptical that there 
was ever really anyone naive enough to 
fall for such a patent fraud. That the 
game goes on in this day and age 
seems incredible but the gold brick 
racket is still verv much alive, though 
with a strange twist. Today's sucker is 
not the back-Avoods yokel of jest and 
stor\- ; he is highlj- regarded in his com- 
munity as a shrewd and astute jeweler. 
"How's that again?" you say. "What 
jeweler would ever be gullible enough 
to fall for a chestnut as ancient and 
obvious as the gold brick game?" The 
answer is to be found in the large cities 
and some of the victims are located 
right here in New York. 

We shall examine the mechanics of 
this fraud later. First, it should be 
appreciated that the gold brick game, 
like most of the other confidence 
rackets operating today, is as old as 
the proverbial hills. Every now and 
then some of them show up with new 
slants, but the old basic formula and 
ingredients are always present. There 
are myriad confidence games going 
under different names and forms, but 
certain things seem to be common to 
all of them. First, in almost all cases 
"con men" work in teams, with each 
member having a part to play; it is 
highl\- unusual that you find one work- 



ing singly. Secondly, the perpetrators 
are usually glib talkers and consum- 
mate actors. These are a "must" if they 
are to be successful confidence opera- 
tors. Next, the key roles of all con- 
fidence games are similar, no matter 
what the particular game might be. 
Lastly, psycholog}' plays a major part 
in all confidence operations. 

Among criminals, the confidence man 
is a master psychologist. His entire 
o])eration is predicated on a knowl- 
edge of human nature and how it reacts 
to a given set of circumstances. He 
may use psychology to build up the ego 
of his victim, for example telling him 
he looks like a reputable, solid type 
of citizen. He may use it to arouse the 
sympathy of his victim for someone 
else. He oftentimes uses it — and this 
is perhaps most important of all — to 
play on the evil intent latent in the 
victim's own heart. 

Police officers who are experts in 
combatting this type of crime know 
that almost all confidence games have, 
as an integral part, the desire of the 
victim to get something for nothing, 
something to which he is not entitled 
atid which he knows is to be gotten at 
the expense of a third party. This 
party may be another individual or 
even the government. Putting it an- 
other way, the victim, himself, is not 
above committing what amounts to a 
larceny, an unlawful act, for a finan- 
cial gain. A notorious confidence man 
is reputed to have once remarked : "No 



sucker can be taken over unless he has 
larceny in his own soul." Whether or 
not this statement is true, case records 
attest that in a great many instances the 
victims aided the perpetrators by the 
victims' own willingness to enter into 
a conspiracy to cheat another. 

Much of the literature dealing with 
confidence games refers to them as 
"Confidence Swindles." Our own Pick- 
pocket and Confidence Squad considers 
this a contradiction of terms. They 
look upon a "swindle" as an operation 
in which the victim is fleeced and is 
completely innocent of any wrong or 
unlawful intention on his own part. 
They consider a "confidence game," on 
the other hand, to be one in which the 
victim has some degree of cul[)aliility» 
His own desire for illicit gain has con- 
tributed to the successful culmination 
of the crime in which he has been 
victimized. 

Pattern of Confidence Games 

/Ml confidence games have a similar 
pattern. There are certain steps which 
are always present and which follow 
each other in a specified order. The 
steps of the typical confidence game in 
their usual sequence are: 

1. Locating or finding the prospec- 
tive victim. 

2. Meeting the prospective victim. 

3. The actual game in play. 

a. The build-up 

b. The convincer 

c. The take 

4. The blow-off. 



— 2- 



Since most confidence games are 
worked by teams rather than by an 
individual working alone, the roles 
played are roughly as follows : 

Number 1 is the "Steerer" or 
"Meet Man," sometimes called the 
"Roper." It is he who makes the first 
contact with the prospective victim by 
one ruse or another. 

Number 2 is the "Inside Man" or 
"Spieler." He comes upon the scene 
after some kind of pre-arranged signal 
from the first man. He always plays 
the part of a complete stranger. 

Number 3 (where the game re- 
quires a third member of the team) is 
known as the "Tail Man." He takes 
little, if any, visible part in the play 
and when he does so, will usually act 
as a reputable business man or some 
other established person in the com- 
munity. 

Many of the games that will be 
described may seem obvious to anyone 
not actively conspiring to make a "fast 
buck." If the actions of the victim 
seem to be on the stupid side, bear in 
mind that the victim, in all these cases, 
is led on by his own impatient desire 
to get his hands on some illicit gain. 
He frequently becomes so engrossed 
with the idea that he is going to "take" 
somebody else, that he is led to do 
things that a rational person would not 
normally do. 

Also, as was pointed out earlier, con- 
fidence team members are con^^ncing 
actors. Remember that they have 
played their parts over and over again. 
The "show" they put on for their vic- 
tims would do justice to many stage 
professionals, and they are wily enough 
to make every sequence of their act 
M)und aboveboard and appear to ha\e 
a logical reason for happening. The 
result is that the victim doesn't realize, 
until it is too late, that he has been to 
the cleaners. 

.Another surprising point is that most 
(it the victims of confidence games are 
supposedly intelligent persons. Regu- 
larly numbered among them are pro- 
fessional men such as doctors and 
lawyers, successful business men and 
college students. This is so because the 
less intelligent type would not be able 
to appreciate the advantage he stands 
to gain from the illicit transaction out- 
lined by the con men. The more astute 
individual is quick to see the possibilitv 
of a "killing" and eagerlv goes for the 
bait. 

Game in Operation 

Locating and Fleecing the Pros- 
pective Victim. This is done by the 
"Meet Man" who makes the first' con- 



tact with the victim in the vicinity of 
a bank, in a department store, railroad 
or bus terminal, or on a selected street. 
The actual location of the point of con- 
tact will be determined by the modus 
operandi of the particular confidence 
gang, or the type of game involved. 
Very often, it is necessary to make 
many contacts before a real sucker is 
found. The proportion of contacts to 
actual suckers has been known to run 
as high as forty to one, before the 
"Meet Man" signals his confederates 
that he has a sucker who appears ready 
to be plucked. 

The Game in Play. This consists 
ot the build-up, the convincer, and the 
lake. The build-up starts after Num- 
ber 1 (the "Meet Man") has signalled 
Number 2 (the "Inside Man") that he 
has a likely prospect. The con men 
then play their parts to gain the con- 
fidence of the victim. If the victim 
begins to show any reluctance or 
timidity, the convincer (a ruse or de- 
vice to allay his fears) is used at this 
point. The "take" is the actual meth- 
od of securing the victim's money. 

The Blow-off. This is the de- 
parture of the con men with the vic- 
tim's money. It usually takes place 
after arranging a meeting with the vic- 
tim to share the loot or for some other 
reason. Needless to say, the meeting 
never occurs. 



Having examined the overall pat- 
tern of confidence operations in gen- 
eral, let us now take a detailed look at 
some of the most prevalent games 
being carried on today. As good a 
place to start as any is the gold brick 
racket we mentioned at the beginning 
of the article. 

Fake Gold Racket 

Present world conditions have great- 
ly increased the demand for pure gold 
in bulk in many countries of I''.urope, 
.\sia and the Middle luist. New coun- 
tries particularly require gold to estab- 
lish financial stability. 

An ounce of pure gold (24-karat 
fine) is worth about $36 an ounce in 
this country. In foreign black market^. 
it Ijrings about $80. This situation has 
tempted many people to violate our 
federal gold laws by smuggling gold 
out of this country to be exchanged for 
uncut diamonds in foreign markets. 
The diamonds are then in turn smug- 
gled into the United States. The Fed- 
eral Gold Act prohibits dealing in pure 
gold in excess of thirty ounces with- 
out a permit from the United States 
Assay Office, but numerous seizures 
made by our own department and fed- 
eral agents attest to the tremendous il- 
licit trafiic going on in this field. 

There is little variance in the moilus 
iiperandi of fake gold confidence ]iien. 



HOW TO TEST PLATE GOLD 




THE PROPER TEST for determining the genuiness of plate gold is demonstrated 

here by Acting Captain Daniel Campion, Commanding Officer of the Pickpocket and 

Confidence Squad. A hole is drilled through a corner of the plate so that nitric 

acid con be applied to the base metal. This is a foolproof test. 



— 3 



CONFIDENCE GAMES 

(Continued) 




In some cases, the build-up or the con- 
vincer may be more elaborate than 
others, but basically they all revolve 
around the victim's desire to profit by 
a violation of the law. The teams will 
usually be found loitering in the 
vicinity of jewelry exchanges, where 
they can get a line on people who show 
a willingness to violate the federal laws. 
Many times the operators of this game 
have no previous records. They may 
even be jewelers whose experiences 
have proven to them how easy it is to 
victimize unscrupulous dealers. Be- 
cause of their background in the 
jewelry business, contacts are easily 
made. 

Upon locating a person known to be 
in the market for pure gold, one of the 
confidence men will proposition him, 
stating that he has a friend with a large 
amount of gold for sale. He shows the 
intended victim a sample of the gold 
in plate or wire form, and allows him 
to take it to a refiner to have its purity 
tested. After careful tests prove the 
sample is genuine, the victim returns to 
the con man, anxious to meet the 
"friend." Number 1 sets up a meeting 
between the victim and Number 2, 
usually at the home of a mutual ac- 
•luaintance of the victim and the con- 
fidence team. This racket is an excep- 
tion to the general rule stated pre- 
viously, that Number 2 plays the part 
of a stranger. In most instances, the 
mutual acquaintance is a dupe and is 
completely unaware that a confidence 
game is in progress. 

Lulled by the proven purity of the 
sample, and because haste is required 
by the very nature of the transaction, 
there is time at the arranged meeting 




THE PARAPHERNALIA (above) is supposed to be capable of printing counter- 
feit currency. Many a not-too-law-abiding sucker has been taken in by smooth talking 
con men who assured him that this was a foolproof way to increase his money supply. 

NO, THIS ISNT A GAS METER. (Left) It's a "Money-Making Machine" which was 

sold by con men for $25,000. In reality just a large metal box with a lot of useless 

gadgets, the victim was led to believe that it was capable of turning out an additional 

piece of paper currency for every authentic one inserted into it. 



for only a superficial confirming test 
of the gold. The victim, assured that 
he has bought genuine gold, pays the 
amount agreed upon, which is usually 
above the market value of the gold — 
this because of the illegality of the 
transaction. What the victim has been 
sold is actually a number of plates of 
rolled gold-plated brass (brass covered 
with a thin layer of real gold.) This 
can be determined by filing one edge 
of the plate or drilling a hole through 
it so that the entire metal can be ex- 
amined. 

Sometimes such meetings take place 
and the game is consummated right on 
the street where passers-by preclude 
any examination of the metal. In such 
cases, the victim soon learns that he 
has paid several thousand dollars for a 
suitcase filled with stones or junk 
metal. On some occasions fake-gold 
victims have purchased painted or 
gilded cement blocks, iron washers, 
copper discs, brass droppings (gold 
dust) and even plain garden variety 
house bricks. 

Because of the fact that the victims 
themselves realize they are involved in 
a conspiracy to violate federal laws, 
many games of this type go unreport- 
ed. Many times when they are re- 
ported, prosecution is made difficult 
by the fear of embarrassment of the 
victim, or fear that his credit rating 
will sufifer because of the attendant 
publicity. Human nature is such that 
any person who realizes he has been 
"taken for a sucker" is reluctant to 
reveal the fact. This is all the more 
true in the case of jewelers who pride 
themselves on being perspicacious busi- 
ness men in a highly competitive field. 



Add to this the fear of prosecution by 
the federal government and it can 
readily be understood why it is so dif- 
ficult to combat frauds of this kind. 

The Pocketbook Drop 

This is one of the oldest confidence 
games, dating back to Asia more than 
one thousand years ago. Many varia- 
tions of it are practiced today but it 
often takes the following form. Two 
members comprise the team and they 
may be white and Negro, male and 
female, or of the same color and sex. 

The operators will usually loiter 
near a savings bank, post office, shop- 
ping district, or in a department store. 
For prospective victims, they select 
elderly women who appear to have 
some degree of financial security. The 
first operator will strike up a casual 
conversation with the victim, while the 
second stays unobserved, close by in 
a doorway or some convenient location. 
I'pon signal from Xumber 1 that she 
has a good \nctim in tow, Number 2 
enters the picture by asking for the 
location of the Lost and Found De- 
partment and stating that she has just 
found a pocketbook containing a large 
sum of money (usually over $500"). 
Number 1 starts up a discussion in 
which it is intimated that she will never 
be sure that the owner will get it 
back if she turns it over to the Lost 
and Found Department. The victim 
will usually suggest that the money 
be turned over to the police, but Num- 
ber 1 will counter this with some con- 
temptuous remark to the efifect that 
the police keep the money themselves. 

After some discussion among the 



— 4 — 



three, Number 2 states that her office 
is around the corner and that she will 
go ask the advice of her "boss," by 
whom she has been employed for a 
long time. (Some operators give the 
actual name and address of a reputable 
person as the "boss," having previous- 
ly obtained it from the directory of 
a nearby office building.) Number 2 
leaves, only to return, all smiles, a 
few minutes later, stating that this is 
really her lucky day. The envelope or 
pocketbook contained not $500 as she 
had first thought, but $5,000 or some 
comparable amount. Also, it held some 
gambling slips, which her boss de- 
stroyed saying that the money belonged 
to a bookmaker. She goes on to say 
that her boss advised her to keep the 
money but when she told him about 
the two women who knew where she 
worked, he suggested that she divide 
the money with her two friends, pro- 
viding they could prove that they were 
responsible people who would not be- 
tray her trust. Her boss, who is hold- 
ing the "found" money, suggested that 
her friends produce $3,000 each as 
evidence that they were responsible 
persons, or in the alternative, to turn 
the money over to the police. Number 

1 at this point brings forth a large 
sum of money (a phony bankroll), 
saying she has just cashed in a life 
insurance policy. The victim is now 
induced to draw $3,000 out of her 
bank to show her "good faith." Num- 
ber 1 accompanies the victim to the 
bank (at times even going so far as 
to make out the withdrawal slip for 
the victim's signature) while Number 

2 waits at the designated meeting place. 

After the return of the victim and 
Number 1, they both turn their money 
over to Number 2, who explains that 
her boss does not want anyone to know 
of his advice in the matter. Number 1 
suggests that Number 2 bring the 
"good faith" money (of the victim 
and Number 1) to her boss. Upon 
Number 2's return, Number 1 is 
told to go to the boss and get her 
share of the find, and the money she 
put up as good faith. While Number 1 
is absent. Number 2 relates to the vic- 
tim how she plans to use her own share 
of the find. When Number 1 returns, 
she remarks what a fine man the boss 
seems to be, and that she saw a lovely 
picture of Number 2 on the boss' desk. 
She exhibits her part of the find and 
her good-faith money. The victim is 
now told to go to the boss to collect 
her share and the additional money 
she put up. As soon as the victim 
leaves, the operators depart with her 
money. This particular game has manv 



variations, but basically the modus 
operandi is that just described. 

Handkerchief Switch 

The Spanish version of the handker- 
chief switch is the most common one 
in existence today. The perpetrators 
are persons of Mexican, Spanish or 
South American extraction. A team 
usually consists of two individuals and 
preys upon Spanish-speaking persons 
in the city. The success of the scheme 
is based to a large extent on the desire 
of the victim to be of help to a fellow 
countryman. 

Number 1, the "Steerer," approaches 
a likely looking prospect on the street 
and greets him in Spanish. If, as 
expected, the reply is in Spanish, Num- 
ber 1 makes inquiries concerning the 
address of a person named Juan Her- 
nandez, or someone with a similar com- 
mon Latin name. Often the victim 
will suggest consulting a telephone di- 
rectory. Pleading unfamiliarity with 
the use of the directory, Number 1 
requests aid from the victim in look- 
ing up the name. 

When examined, the phone book is 
found to list numerous persons named 
Juan Hernandez. This causes Num- 
ber 1 to become dejected and confused. 
As he begins to tell his stor}- to the 
victim, another person, Number 2, the 
"Inside Man," appears on the scene 
and greets the pair in Spanish. Num- 
ber 1 eagerly queries Number 2 about 
Juan Hernandez. It turns out that 
Number 2 does know a person by that 

An Old ' 



name and he asks Number 1 why he 
wishes to locate him. 

Replying that the story is a long 
one. Number 1 says his father is dying 
in Mexico after having made a for- 
tune in business. A priest, called to 
administer the last rites, heard his 
confession during which the dying man 
revealed that his entire fortune was 
started with $3,000 that he stole from 
a Juan Hernandez many years ago. 
The priest informed him that it would 
be necessary for him to make restitu- 
tion of the" $3,000 plus interest if he 
wanted to die in peace. Number 1 
explains that his purpose in coming 
to America now is to repay the money 
for his father. At this point he dis- 
plays a roll of bills, purported to rep- 
resent $4,000 in • United States cur- 
rency. Actually it consists of numerous 
single bills with a few of large de- 
nomination on both top and bottom. 

Number 2, obviously touched by the 
story, guides Number 1 and the vic- 
tim in the direction of the residence of 
Juan Hernandez. As they walk along. 
Number 2 inquires as to what would 
have been the disposition of the money, 
if Number 1 had been unable to locate 
Hernandez. Number 1 replies that 
that would be a grave misfortune 
which he does not care to think about. 
When they reach a large apartment 
house, Number 2 directs Number 1 to 
apartment 46, which is that of Juan 
Hernandez. After Number 1 leaves. 
Number 2 tells the victim that Her- 
nandez is dead and that the money can 
never be repaid. 

'Con-Man" 





LIVING PROOF THAT ADVANCING AGE IS NO DETERRENT to confidence opera- 
tors is provided by Samuel Cooper alias Samuel Bloom presently wanted for defrauding 
a Brooklyn resident of $25,000 in the "Money-Making Machine" game. He is 

sixty-nine years of age. 



— 5- 



CONFIDENCE GAMES 

(Continued) 

Within a few minutes Number 1 
returns, very dejected, with the news 
of Hernandez' death. Number 2 now 
consoles him, saying that the conditions 
will still be fulfilled if the money is 
turned over to the church or to some 
reputable Spanish person for distribu- 
tion to Si)anish charity. Number 1 ad- 
mits to the other two that the priest 
had considered this possibility and had 
directed him, in such an event, to dis- 
tribute the money to charity. 

Number 2 assures Number 1 that 
the problem can be easily solved. Their 
new-found acquaintance, the victim, is 
just the man to distribute the money. 
In fairness, though, the $1,000 interest 
should go to the victim for handling 
the distribution of the $3,000. The 
victim, protesting his unworthiness, 
nevertheless agrees to accept the "re- 
sponsibility" of distributing the money. 
Number 1 hesitates, saying that he 
must be sure of the honesty and repu- 
tation of the person to whom he turns 
over the money. He asks the victim 
if he can produce a like amount to 
show his good faith. Upon the victim's 
agreement to this, all three proceed to 
the victim's bank where $3,000 is with- 
drawn. An important point to note 
here is that the visit to the bank is 
made just prior to closing time. 

The three men now adjoin to a near- 
by restaurant or bar to discuss plans 
for the distribution of the money. 
Number 1 takes his $4,000 from his 
pocket and asks the victim to place it 
with his own $3,000 in a handkerchief 
which Number 1 takes from an inside 
pocket. The money is now wrapped 
in the handkerchief and tied securely. 
Next comes some sleight of hand work 
and, while the victim's attention is 
momentarily diverted, a switch of an 
identical handkerchief bundle is made. 
Number 1, then stating his fear that 
the money will be lost, requests the 
victim to open his shirt so that the 
money can be placed close to his body 
and thus guarded more carefully. The 
victim agrees and this is done. A date 
is made for the following day when 
they can discuss further plans for the 
distribution of the monev. The victim 




departs, believing that he has a hand- 
kerchief containing $7,000 buttoned 
securely inside his shirt. In reality, he 
is carrying with the utmost care a 
Spanish newspaper, folded inside a 
similar handkerchief to the one con- 
taining the victim's $3,000 which is 
now in the possession of the con men. 

Diamond Switch 

This game should more properly be 
called "Fake Diamonds," because no 
actual switch takes place. The stones 
used are fakes from the start. The 
game relies for success on the trust 
placed by persons of foreign birth in 
others found to speak their mother 
tongue. 

The "Meet Man" or Number 1 in 
this game is garbed as a merchant sea- 
man. He approaches the victim, usu- 
ally an elderly women of foreign ex- 
traction and of some means, on the 
street in the neighborhood where she 
resides. This meeting might well take 
place while she is "sunning" herself on 
a public bench in the mid-morning 
hours. In the foreign language known 
to the victim, he inquires as to the ad- 
dress of some fictitious person, adding 
that he has some diamonds to deliver 
to the party named. The fact that the 
"sailor" speaks the mother tongue and 
her natural woman's inquisitiveness 
will usually prompt the victim to in- 
quire about the "old country." 

While the conversation is taking 
place, a well-dressed man approaches 
and the sailor asks him (also in the 
foreign language) about the person 
being sought. The well-dressed arrival, 
who is actually the Inside Man, or 
Number 2, states that he does not 
know the party concerned and in turn 
asks the sailor why he wants him. The 
seaman tells him of the diamonds and 
furtively removes a box from beneath 
his shirt. It is found to contain about 
twelve white stones which, the sailor 
says, he smuggled into the country. 

Number 2 examines the stones and 
switching to English, he tells the vic- 
tim that they are perfect white dia- 
monds worth a considerable sum of 
money. In answer to a question from 



IN THE "HANDKERCHIEF SWITCH" 
GAME, the victim Is duped info believing 
that a large sum of money has been 
entrusted to him. Actually, all he has is 
a handkerchief containing a "roll" of 
blank pieces of paper with a single bill 
of large denomination as a cover. 

— — 



Number 2, again in the foreign lan- 
quage, the sailor says that he was to 
receive $4,000 for the stones from the 
party he is seeking. Number 2, using 
luiglish again, proposes to the victim 
that they have the stones appraised by 
a jeweler and if they are found to be 
genuine that they become partners in 
the purchase of the diamonds. 

Upon agreement by the victim, 
Number 2 says he knows a jeweler. 
A taxi is hailed and the three people 
proceed to a location a mile or so away. 
As the three alight from the cab. Num- 
ber 2 points out the jeweler's shop and 
just at that moment a man wearing an 
eyeshade is seen coming from the door- 
way in his shirtsleeves. (The "jewel- 
er" is the "Tail Man" or Number 3 
of the team who has been following 
the game from its inception.) At a 
signal from Number 2 he had left the 
scene of the original meeting so that 
he could emerge from the shop just 
as the trio arrived in the cab. 

Number 2 hails the jeweler and asks 
him if he will appraise the stones. 
Protesting that he is very busy with 
work for the government, the jeweler 
nevertheless agrees to give a quick ap- 
praisal as a favor for a friend. They 
move to a doorway and the jeweler 
takes a jeweler's glass from his pocket 
and places it in his eye. After a hasty 
examination, he says that the stones 
are worth at least $10,000 and ex- 
presses an interest in thetn himself. 
However, Number 2 thanks him and 
says that they are interested only in 
his appraisal. The jeweler hurries back 
to his woi^k. The sailor, who up to 
now gave no indication that he under- 
stood any English, evinces great inter- 
est at the appraisal of the jeweler. 

Convinced by now of the genuine- 
ness of the bargain, the victim is in- 
duced not only to become a partner in 
the deal but agrees to put up the entire 
$4,000, when Number 2 discloses that 
his own bank is too far away for him 
to get his share that day. The sailor 
now shows some reluctance at going 
through with the deal, saying that, 
while he does not understand English, 
he did understand the jeweler's ap- 

(Continued on page 24} 



^ 



10 





Mrs. Elizabeth Campazzi (left) receives the cash portion of 
THE NEWS Hero Award from the Police Commissioner as Ser- 
geant Earl Campazzi and his sister, Mary (Mrs. Edward Boyle), 



watch. (Right) Patrolman Edward A. Rooney holds his Certificate 
of Honor from the JOURNAL-AMERICAN as Commissioner 
Monaghan presents the cash award to the officer's wife, Alice. 



Serjeant Wounded In Gun Battle Honored By News Award 

Journal- American Cites Cop for Singlehanded Capture of Holdup Quartet 



SERGE.\NT Earl Camp.-kzzi, 19th 
Precinct, received the News Hero 
Award for March from the Police 
Commissioner, last April 2. Out of 
New York Hospital only a few days, 
Sergeant Campazzi had spent three 
weeks there recuperating from bullet 
wounds inflicted when he and his 
RMP operator interrupted a holdup 
in a liquor store on East 69th Street. 
Details of the gun battle are related on 
page 13 of this issue, wherein Ser- 
geant Campazzi and the two patrolmen 
who assisted him are awarded Honor- 
able Mention citations for their dar- 
ing exploit. 

Campazzi is an army veteran of 
World War II. He was in the counter- 
intelligence corps. His father, the late 
Patrolman John J. Campazzi, spent 
thirty-seven years on the force and 
died in service in 1942. Still on sick 
leave and undergoing daily medical 
treatment, Campazzi has been pro- 
moted to acting lieutenant and assigned 
to the Detective Division since the 
shooting. He came into the depart- 
ment on June 22, 1943. 

Holds Six Awards 

The Journal-American Public Pro- 
tector Award for March went to Pa- 
trolman Edward A. Rooney. 26th 
Precinct, who shortly after midnight 
on March 25, arrested single-handedly 
three men and a girl who had just 
committed an armed robbery. 



Assigned as operator and recorder 
of his RMP car, Rooney heard an- 
other car report over the two-way 
radio that the quartet had escaped in 
a taxicab after committing an assault 
and robber}- in a Columbus Avenue 
delicatessen. Anticipating that they 
might try to use the Henry Hudson 
Parkway as a getaway route, Rooney 
headed for the 72nd Street entrance. 
Within seconds after he got there, he 
saw a cab race up the northbound 
ramp of the parkway. Taking off 
after them, he radioed the dispatcher 
and requested that all exits of the 
parkway be blocked. He succeeded in 



overtaking the cab at 119th Street and 
forced it to the curb. 

With drawn revolver, he ordered 
the occupants out. A frisk revealed a 
pistol in the pockets of one of the 
men and a butcher knife on the floor 
of the cab. After placing the occu- 
pants under arrest, he took them to 
the 26th Precinct where they were 
identified by the proprietor of the deli- 
catessen. All four had previous police 
records. One man and the girl had 
been arrested only three days previ- 
ously on assault and narcotics charges. 

A thirteen-year veteran of the de- 
partment, Rooney is the holder of six 
citations for outstanding police work. 



Memoranda 



MAY 

1. ST. GEORGE ASSN. Meeting. Masonic Hall, 
8 P.M. 

2. ANCHOR CLUB. First Friday Mass. St. Francis 
of Assisi Church. 

3. COLUMBIA ASSN. Dance, Hotel Astor. 

5. GREATER NY. POLICE POST, VFW. Meeting. 
Sokol Hall. 

6. GUARDIANS ASS'N. Meeting. Clubrooms. 

8. CAPTAINS' ASS'N. Meeting. ZUt Rcg't 
Armory. 

12. N.Y. POLICE GARRISON 3100. Meeting. Club- 
rooms. 

13. PBA. Delegates' Meeting. Werdermann Hall, 
10 A.M. 

POLICEWOMEN'S ASSN. Meeting. Hotel 
Biltmore, 5:30 P.M. 

SQUARE CLUB. Meeting. Masonic Hall, 8 
P.M. 
15. POLICEWOMEN'S ASSN. Dance. Manhattan 
Center. 



20. COLUMBIA ASSN. Meeting. Werdermonn 
Hall. 

GUARDIANS ASS'N. Meeting. Clubrooms. 
N.Y.C. POLICE POST, AL. Meeting. Jewish 
Guild for Blind, 8:30 P.M. 

SHOMRIM SOC. Meeting. Riverside Plaza 
Hotel, 8 P.M. 

21. CIVILIAN COUNCIL. Meeting. Trial Room, 6 
P.M. 

26. N.Y. POLICE GARRISON 3100. Meeting. Club 
rooms. 

27. WM. E. SHERIDAN POST, AL. Meeting. Club- 
rooms. 

28. LIEUTENANTS' ASS'N. Meeting. Gov. Clinton 
Hotel. 

TRAFFIC SQUAD ASS'N. Meeting. Monhotton 

Center. 

30. MEMORIAL DAY. 



•7- 




COMMISSIONER MONAGHAN flanked by Chief Inspector 
Rothengast, (left), extends his congratulations to the men receiv- 
ing the top promotions at ceremonies held on March 14. Left 
to right: Deputy Chief Inspectors Edward W. Byrnes and Frank 



H. Riley and Assistant Chief Inspector Rudolph A. Peters. SUR- 
ROUNDED BY HIS HAPPY FAMILY, (Right), newly promoted 
Captain William E. McGinn accepts the congratulations of 
the Commissioner at ceremonies held on March 15. 



Forty-Three Appointments Exhaust Captain's list 

Detective District Commanders Promoted to Deputy Inspector 



0.\ Marcli 15, five hours before the captain's list was to expire officially, twenty- 
nine lieutenants were hastily summoned to Police Headquarters and sworn 
in as captains. The promotions, which exhausted the list, became possible when 
the Board of Estimate met in special session at 5:15 P.M. of the same day and 
heeded the plea of Police Commissioner George P. Monaghan to grant the neces- 
sary appropriation. To effect the promotions without additional cost to the city, 
it became necessary to withdraw extra compensation from some lieutenants acting 
as captains. 

On the preceding day, March 14, another promotion ceremony took place in 
the Line-up Room at headquarters. At this occasion, the top promotion went to 
Deputy Chief Inspector Rudolph A. Peters who was elevated to assistant chief 
inspector in command of the Traffic Division. Captain Peter E. Terranova, com- 
manding officer of the Narcotic Squad, was advanced to deputy inspector and 
is the first Central Office squad commander to hold this rank. The Commissioner 
in making the appointment praised Inspector Terranova for his "yeoman work 
since the drive against narcotics started. Under your leadership we are winning 
our fight in the war against sellers and users." The ceremonies also included the 
promotion of fourteen lieutenants to the rank of captain. 

The line of blue moved forward once again on April 1, when Commissioner 
Monaghan advanced thirteen captains to the rank of deputy inspector. Twelve 
of the new deputy inspectors have been in command of detective districts and will 
retain their commands in their new capacity. Captain Joseph P. Driscoll who 
commands the Statistical and Records Bureau was the uniformed officer who 
advanced to the higher rank. 

Pointing to the beneficial efifect which the elevations would have on the Detec- 
tive Division, Commissioner Monaghan said he hoped to get sufficient funds to 
promote all district commanders to the rank of deputy inspector. "I believe," he 
said, "that the Detective Division has been neglected over the years. Commanding 
officers were not brought to the same rank as their counterparts in the uniformed 
force. It's about time they were rewarded." 



ASSISTANT CHIEF INSPECTOR 

Rudolph A. Peters, Traffic Division 

DEPUTY CHIEF INSPECTORS 

Frank H. Riley, 3rd Dist. Traf. 
Edward W. Byrnes, Det. Div. Boro. 
Hq. Bx. 

INSPECTORS 

William G. Kimmins, Det. Div. Boro. 

Hq. Bklyn. E. 
Edward T. Feeley, Det. Div. Boro. 

Hq. Qns. 

DEPUTY INSPECTORS 

Daniel G. Oliva, Boro. Hq. Bklyn. E. 
Peter E. Terranova, Det. Div. Narcotic 

Squad 
Carl I. Blank, Det. Div. Boro. Hq. Rich. 
Joseph P. Driscoll, Comm. & Records 

Div. 
Joseph L. Coyle, Det. Div. 1st D.D. 
Frederick M. Lussen, Det. Div. 5th D.D. 
John V. Hoik, Det. Div. 11th D.D. 
Martin T. Donelon, Det. Div. 12th D.D. 



— 8 — 



DEPUTY INSPECTORS 

(Continued) 

Joseph Hauer, Jr., Det. Div. 15th D.D. 
Edward F. Fagan, Det. Div. 17th D.D. 
William L. Hayden, Det. Div. 18th D.D. 
James S. J. Lockhart, Det. Div. 19th D.D. 
Hugh T. McGovern, Det. Div. 21st D.D. 
John E. Sexton, Det. Div. 22nd D.D. 

CAPTAINS 

Walter F. Henning, Det. Div. 23rd D.D. 
Frank J. Dunn, Det. Div. 16th D.D. 
Walter G. Clark, 6th Div. 
Thomas L. Fay, 1st Div. 
Wilmot H. Miller, Boro. Hq. Qns. 
Joseph F. Frey, Boro. Hq. Man. W. 
Salvatore R. Loprete, Boro. Hq. Ex. 
Frank Ballweg, Boro Hq. Rich. 
George Schroeder, 20th Div. 
Isadore N. Schwal, Trof. Div. 
George C. Kochman, Boro Hq. Rich. 
Albert C. Dunn, Traf. H 
Carl W. Vollmer, 4th Div. 
Charles W. Hilkemeier, 2nd Div. 
Edward A. Fitzgerald, Det. Div. CO. 
John G. H. Seery, Boro. Hq. Qns. 
Howard H. Teubner, Mfd. Sqdn. No. 2 
Louis E. Butler, 1st Dist. Traf. 
William N. Kraus, Traf. Div. 
Walter J. Brdey, 19th Div. 
Lawrence J. McKearney, Det. Div. 

6th D.D. 
James J. Walsh, Det. Div. 6th D.D. 
Thomas F. J. Anderson, Det. Div. 13th 

D.D. 
John J. Bradt, Jr., Det. Div. 16th D.D. 
John H. Dunn, Det. Div. 20th D.D. 
William E. McGinn, Off. of 4th D.P.C. 
Otto J. Dreiss, Boro. Hq. Bx. 
Richard V. Cleary, Boro. Hq. Qns. 
Michael J. Chimenti, Boro. Hq. Bklyn E. 
Neil C. Winberry, 12th Div. 
Peter F. Costello, Boro. Hq. Man. W. 
John Britt, Mtd. Sqdn. No. 1 
George Maiberger, 11th Div. 
EIroy V. Smith, Boro. Hq. Bklyn. W. 
Michael Sabatino, Boro. Hq. Bklyn. W. 
John M. Horn, Boro. Hq. Man. W. 
Archibald C. Love, Boro. Hq. Bklyn. E. 
Gerard J. Galvin, 3rd Div. 
Edward L. F. Mullaney, Boro. Hq. 

Man.E. 
Walter F. Callahan, Boro. Hq. Man. E. 
David Ross, 13th Div. 
Timothy M. Mitchell, 3rd Dist. Traf. 
James B. A. Grant, G.C.f*. Pet. 



ON THE CLIMB UP THE LADDER 




PROMOTED ON MARCH 14 were, left to right: Inspectors Edward T. Feeley and Wil- 
liam G. Kimmins, Deputy Inspectors Peter E. Terranova and Daniel G. Oliva. 




SECOND DEPUTY POLICE COMMISSIONER JOHN J. O'CONNOR (right) poses with 
the thirteen captains promoted to the rank of deputy inspector on April 1. 




FOURTEEN LIEUTENANTS, (above), were promoted to the rank of captain on March 14. 

On March 15, twenty-nine lieutenants (below), were summoned to headquarters and 

sworn in as captains o few hours before the expiration of the list. 




Def. James Daggett 

Deceased 



AWARDED 

HONORABLE 

MENTION 




Honor Comniittee Cites 869 Officers 

Deceased Det. Daggett's Name to be Placed on Memorial Tablet 
Sergeant, 5 Detectives and 6 Patrolmen Receive Honorable Mention 



^ I *\vo General Orders and a teletype message, contain- 
-*■ ing the names of members of the force cited for meri- 
torious acts, were published during the month of March. 
The Honor Committee held several special meetings during 
the month so that the examination credits, recognized by 
the Municipal Civil Service Commission for departmental 
awards, would be available to the men participating in the 
promotion examination for sergeant on March 29. General 
Orders No. 10 contained 395 awards. General Orders No. 
11 contained 236, and the teletype message of March 28 
contained 238 others. 

Detective James L. Daggett, who was killed in an arson 
blast last September 10, received the posthumous award of 
Honorable Mention. His name is to be placed on the tablet 
at Police Headquarters. Sergeant Earl J. Campazzi, five 
detectives and six patrolmen also were awarded Honorable 
Mention which automatically makes them eligible to be the 
recipient of one of the medals to be awarded either late 
this month or early in June. 

Awards for other acts of meritorious conduct included : 
Exceptional Merit — 23; Commendation — 173; Meritorious 
Police Duty— 399; and Excellent Police Dut\ — 260. 

HONORABLE MENTION 

{Name to be placed on Tablet at Police Headquarters) 

Detective James L. Daggett, Shield No. 727, Safe, 
Loft and Truck Squad, Detective Division. At about 9:30 
P.M., September 10, 1951, while on duty, accompanied by 
four other detectives, observed four men, two of whom 
were known safe burglars, drive an automobile up to 
premises 9 West 18th Street, Manhattan, and then carry a 
number of paper cartons into said building. After a few 
minutes, the four men emerged from the building carrying 
the empty cartons. Two men drove away in the automo- 
bile and the other two men re-entered the building. The 
two men in the automobile were apprehended and admitted 
to the detectives that a fire was going to be set in the 
premises. Detective Daggett with another detective entered 
the premises and apprehended the two men therein and 
while leaving with their prisoners a loud explosion occurred 
followed by a fire. Detective Daggett and one of the 
prisoners were instantly killed. The other detective and 
his prisoner were seriously injured and removed to a hos- 
pital where the prisoner died two days later. The two 



other prisoners were indicted for first degree murder. Four 
other detectives who participated in this case have been 
awarded in these orders. 

HONORABLE MENTION 

Detective Jeremiah O'Connor, Shield No. 2056, and 
Davis Wahl, Shield No. 499, 42nd Squad, Detective Divi- 
sion. At about 9:00 P.M., July 27, 1951, while on motor 
patrol, in the vicinity of 160th Street and Westchester Ave- 
nue, Bronx, observed a man answering the description of 
the perpetrator of a series of assaults and robberies of 
taxicab drivers and approximately seventy-five pocketbook 
larcenies in the Boroughs of the Bronx and !Nlanhattan. 
The suspect entered a taxicab, proceeded to the vicinity of 
128th Street and Madison Avenue where he had a conver- 
sation with several other men, and then re-entered another 
taxicab and returned to the above location. As the detec- 
tives approached to question him, an unknown person 

OFFICERS assigned fo the 42nd Precinct and Detective Squad 
won a total of 54 awards, the uniformed men taking 31 
awards and the detectives 23. Below, left. Captain John 
Petrenchick is shown with some of the award winners and in 



1^, 








• 

• 
• 

• 


. ■ • • • • 

r. r : •• • r 

• • 

• • • • 

• ■ • • • 



10- 



PtI. Richard Corbett 




shouted a warning to him and he tied south on Prospect 
Avenue with the detectives in pursuit. As he reached West- 
chester Avenue, he suddenly turned and fired a shot from 
an automatic pistol. The detectives returned the fire. As 
the chase continued, the suspect again discharged another 
shot at the officers and then began to dodge in and out be- 
tween parked cars. When overtaken the suspect attempted 
to fire point-blank at the officers but was quickly subdued, 
disarmed and placed under arrest. The prisoner, who suf- 
fered slight gunshot wounds of the face and temple as a 
result of shots fired by the detectives, admitted committing 
the above crimes with an accomplice who was later taken 
into custody. Both men have criminal records. 

Detectives Nicholas J. Cotter, Shield No. 1948, and 
Davis Wahl, Shield No. 499, 42nd Squad, Detective Divi- 
sion. At about 9:35 P.M., September 1, 1951, while on 
special patrol in an automobile, observed a taxicab stop in 
front of premises 892 Cauldwell Avenue, Bronx. A pas- 
senger in the taxicab alighted, drew a gun and pointed 
same at the taxicab driver's head. The detectives alighted 
from their automobile, announced they were police officers 
and ordered the bandit to drop his gun and surrender. The 
bandit turned towards the police officers, fired one shot at 
them and started to run north on Cauldwell Avenue pur- 
sued by the detectives. Detective Cotter discharged two 
shots and Detective Wahl discharged three shots at the 
fleeing bandit all of which took effect. The bandit was dis- 
armed of a loaded revolver and removed to a hospital where 

the picture on right. Deputy Inspector John V. Halk, (front left) 

poses with some of the detectives attached to the 42nd Squad 

who received departmental recognition for their work. Many 

men won several awards in these orders. 




he subsequently died. Prior to his death the bandit admitted 
to committing forty armed robberies in this city. The de- 
ceased bandit had a record of two previous arrests for 
assaults in another state prior to his coming to this city. 

Detective Howard J. Phelan, Shield No. 1786, Safe, 
Loft and Truck Squad, Detective Division. At about 9 :30 
P.M., September 10, 1951, while on duty, accompanied by 
four other detectives, observed four men, two of whom 
were known safe burglars, drive an automobile up to 
premises 9 West 18th Street, Manhattan, and then carry a 
number of paper cartons into said building. After a few 
minutes, the four men emerged from the building carrying 
the empty cartons. Two men drove away in the automo- 
bile and the other two men re-entered the building. The 
two men in the automobile were apprehended and admitted 
to Detective Phelan that a fire was going to be set in the 
premises. Detective Phelan and his partner entered the 
premises and apprehended the two men therein and while 
leaving with their prisoners a loud explosion occurred fol- 
lowed by a fire. Detective Phelan was blown through a 
wall and in a semi-conscious condition crawled the balance 
of the way to the street with his clothes afire. His partner 
and one of the prisoners were killed in the explosion. De- 
tective Phelan and the other prisoner were taken to St. 
Vincent's Hospital in serious condition. The prisoner died 
two days later as a result of the explosion. The two other 
prisoners were indicted for first degree murder. Four other 
officers who participated in this case have been awarded 
in these orders. 

Detective Benjamin F. Page, Shield No. 67, 32nd 
Squad, Detective Division. At about 1 :00 A.M., November 
1, 1951, while on duty, was informed that a holdup was in 
progress in premises 2419 Eighth Avenue, Manhattan. 
Arriving at the scene, he observed two men, both with 
guns in their hands, running from an apartment. Identify- 
ing himself as a police officer, he ordered them to halt. They 
both pointed their revolvers at him, and one attempted to 
fire but his gun failed to discharge. Detective Page fired 
two shots from his service revolver, seriously wounding 
one of the culprits ; the second holdup man made his escape. 
The wounded man was disarmed of a loaded pistol. He 
was removed to a hospital, where he died six days later as 
a result of the gunshot wound inflicted by the officer. The 
records reveal that the prisoner had a previous criminal 
record. 

Patrolman James T. Cooley, Shield No. 15692, 73rd 
Precinct. At about 4:35 A.M,. December 18, 1951, while 
on patrol in the vicinity of a gas station at 1927 Atlantic 
Avenue, where previous holdups had occurred, obsen'ed a 
slow moving automobile which aroused his suspicion. Pa- 
trolman Cooley immediately proceeded to the gas station, 
informed the attendant of his suspicion and secreted him- 



11 — 



AWARDS AND COMMENDATIONS 

iContinuvd) 

self in tlic nar oflicc. About ten niiiiulcs later, a man 
entered the office with a drawn gun and proceeded to com- 
mit a holdup. Patrolman Cooley emerged from the rear of 
the office. The bandit pointed the gun at the officer, pulled 
the trigger but the gun misfired. The officer ordered the 
bandit to drop his gun, which he did and surrendered. 
Prisoner has a previous criminal record. 

Patrolman Norton Baxt, Shield No. 14109, 82nd Pre- 
cinct. At about 6:25 P.M., December 21, 1951, on radio 
motor patrol duty proceeded to a three story and attic 
building at 140 State Street, Brooklyn, where a deranged 
man, armed with a large carving knife, had threatened to 
assault three other men and then barricaded himself in the 
attic. Patrolman Baxt and another officer ascended to the 
third floor landing where they observed the man standing 
on a narrow stairway leading to the attic and attempted 
to coax him to come down. Instead of complying, the 
demented man threw a bed spring which blocked the stair- 
way and struck at Patrolman Baxt with a knife. The other 
patrolman fired three shots over the man's head causing 
him to flee into the attic. At this time the Emergency 
Squad arrived and threw two tear gas grenades into the 
attic. Patrolman Baxt and a member of the Emergency 
Squad donned gas masks and proceeded into the attic. 
Patrolman Baxt discovered the demented man hiding in a 
small closet-like rooin, whereupon the man started wielding 
the knife at the officer which struck the cannister of his 
gas mask. In the struggle the officer struck back with his 
baton, breaking it, also causing the door of the small room 
to be blocked and preventing the member of the Emergency 

Two-Time Winner 




DETECTIVE WILLIAM J. EGAN, 41st Squad, receives his next 
assignment from Acting Lieutenant Frank McDonald. Egan, the 
holder of the Police Combat Cross for a 1946 gun battle, was 
awarded a Commendation for the capture of on armed hold- 
up man on December 1. Detective Eagan was in a liquor store 
investigating a previous robbery which occurred on October 13 
when the second holdup was unsuccessfully attempted. 



Service Squad Inim entering. The denunled man continued 
to strike at Patrolman Baxt with the knife, slabbing him 
in the side and right hand. Patrolman Baxt then fired five 
shots at the man as the struggle continued. The door was 
then forced open by the Emergency Service Squad mem- 
ber and Patrolman Baxt threw the man out of the closet. 
The man lunged at the other officer with the knife and the 
officer fired two shots mortally wounding him. Two other 
officers who participated in this case have been awarded 
in these orders. 

Sergeant Earl J. Campazzi, Shield No. 1216, Patrol- 
men Frank A. Rinaldi, Shield No. 1592, and John 
MiLESii, Shield No. 12459, 19th Precinct. At about 9:25 
P.M., March 10, 1952, Sergeant Campazzi and Patrolman 
Rinaldi, on radio motor patrol, observed two suspicious 
men enter a liquor store at 235 East 69th Street. The 
officers, with their revolvers drawn, entered the store and 
one of the perpetrators shoved a revolver against the right 
ear of Patrolman Rinaldi and ordered him to drop his re- 
volver, and called to the Sergeant to drop his gun. Patrol- 
man Rinaldi turned swiftly and struck the man with his 
fist, and as the gunman was ofif balance, he discharged one 
shot which caused a burn on the right side of the patrol- 
man's chin. The other gunman emerged from the rear room 
with a gun in his hand, and the Sergeant fired one shot 
from his service revolver, which struck and wounded the 
gunman, who retreated into the rear room. In the mean- 
time the other gunman fired three shots at the Sergeant, 
who sustained serious injuries, and was removed to a hospi- 
tal. Patrolman Rinaldi fired at this gunman and then 
grappled with him, and after a short struggle, subdued 
and disarmed him. Patrolman Milesh, in response to a 
radio call, proceeded to the scene, and upon arrival observed 
the Sergeant lying on the floor and was warned that the 
gunman was in the rear room. He opened the door and 
when the gunman raised his gun in an attempt to shoot 
him. Patrolman Milesh fired one shot, which fatally wounded 
the gunman. Three other patrolmen who participated in 
this case have been awarded in these orders. 

Patrolmen William J. Graham, Shield No. 4100, and 
Rich.\rd a. Corbett, Shield No. 11782, 6th Precinct. At 
about 9:05 P.M., March 8, 1952, Patrolmen Graham and 
Corbett on radio motor patrol, were informed that a man, 
armed with two pistols, had held up a hack driver and stolen 
his taxicab a short time previously, in the vicinity of Jane 
and ^\'ashington Streets, Manhattan. The officers searched 
the vicinity and observed the stolen taxicab traveling .south 
on West ."Street and turn east into West 12th Street. Dur- 
ing the ensuing chase, the taxicab and radio car became 
involved in heavy vehicular traffic and the cars were aban- 
doned and the pursuit continued on foot. During the chase, 
the officers discharged several shots at the fleeing man who 
took refuge behind a parked car at Horatio and Greenwich 
Streets, and then fired two shots ineffectively at the officers. 
Another Patrolman, on patrol duty, heard the shots and 
joined in the pursuit. As the chase continued, the bandit 
again took refuge behind a parked car at 8th Avenue and 
Jane Street, and pointed the gun in the direction of the 
officers. The bandit realizing his escape was cut off took 
refuge underneath the parked car. As Patrolman Graham 
and Patrolman Corbett approached the bandit from one 
side of the car, he reached out from under the car and fired 
a shot at them. The other officer who was covering the 
other side of the car, attempted to reach under the car to 
disarm the bandit. At the same time. Patrolmen Graham 
and Corbett grabbed the extended right arm of the bandit, 
and with another officer wrestled on the ground with the 



— 12 



bandit until they succeeded in dragging him from under- 
neath the car and disarmed him of the loaded pistol. The 
bandit was found to be suffering from gunshot wound of 
the right jaw. 



EXCEPTIONAL MERIT 

Lieutenants 

Harry Taylor — 73rd Sqd. 
William A. G. J. Dunn— 
78th Sqd. 

Detectives 

Davis Wahl^t2nd Sqd. 
Nicholas J. Cotter— 42nd Sqd. 
Frank A. Malerba— 23rd Sqd. 
Martin J. Zinkand— 23rd Sqd. 
Vincent J. Hefferen— 23rd Sqd 
Albert Beron— 73rd Sqd. 
David Cohen— 73rd Sqd. 
Robert H. McDermott— 

73rd Sqd. 
Charles J. Engel— 73rd Sqd. 
Victor Shanley, Jr.— 78th Sqd. 
Thomas P. Walsh— 78th Sqd. 

Patrolmen 

James P. Slevin— 23rd Pet. 
Daniel J. O'Connor— 24th Pet. 
Theodore I. Bielefeld— 

108th Pet. 
Edward F. Muegar— 108th Pet. 
Cornelius J, Browne— 80th Pet 
John A. Tail— Mtd. Sqdn. 1 
John J. Loughlin— 24th Pet. 
Arthur C. Parkerjr.— 32nd Pet. 
Leonard Kail— 16th Pet. 
Peter R. Speranza- 16th Pet. 

COMMENDATION 

Inspector 

Joseph J. D'.Azevedo— 7th Div. 

Acting Lieutenant 

Edward P. Boyle— 19th Sqd. 
Donald E. Carey — 40th Sqd. 

Sergeants 

Timothy ]. Sullivan— 17th Pet. 
Roy A. Hatem— 28th Pet. 
Thomas J. McCrink— 7th Pet. 

Acting Sergeant 

John F. Cottone— Nar. Sqd. 

Detectives 

Francis X. Farrell— 19th Sqd. 
John Mahoney— 19th Sqd. 
Marco J. De Serio— Nar. Sqd. 
Isaac Ezargui — Nar. Sqd. 
Edward T. Murtagh— Nar. Sqd. 
Paul C. Heim— Nar. Sqd. (2) 
Stephen J. Wall— Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
James J. Cusick— Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Russel S. Zacka— Safe, Lgft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Edward L. Swenson, Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Joseph A. Vellon— 32nd Sqd. 
James H. Harding— 32nd Sqd. 
Daniel J. Kelleher— 32nd Sqd. 
William J. Fyffe— Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Francis X. Shannon — Safe. Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 



Kenneth F. Fagan — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
George Egner — 14th Sqd. 
George Bockhold — 32nd Sqd. 
Vincent X. Murphy — 32nd Sqd. 
Charles A. Fazio— 81st Sqd. 
Frank A. Santelli— 79th Sqd. 
William E. Kelly— 32nd Sqd. 
Salvatore J. -Miotta — 32nd Sqd. 
Howard B. Merwin — 34th Sqd. 
Jack Seltzer— 34th Sqd. 
Jeremiah O'Connor — 42nd Sqd. 
Davis Wahl— 42nd Sqd. 
.'\nthony T. La Rocco, Jr. — 

42nd Sqd. 
Frank A. Malerba — 23 Sqd. (3) 
Martin J. Zinkand — 23 Sqd. (3) 
Vincent 1. Hefferen— 23 Sqd. (3) 
John C. Riewerts— 28th Sqd. 
Thomas A. Twomey — 28th Sqd. 
Victor Fuchs — Nar. Sqd. (2) 
John J. Buckley— Nar. Sqd. (2) 
George Lidowitz — 61st Sqd. 
Jaines M. McMahon — 61st Sqd. 
David Cohen — 73rd Sqd. 
Alferd E. Smith— 73rd Sqd. 
Walter E. Brady— 73rd Sqd. 
Fred Inzerillo — 73rd Sqd. 
James E. Brannigan — 18th Sqd. 
John P. Delaney— 8th Sqd. 
William T. Eagan — 41st Sqd. 
William j. Gilmartin-D.A. Off. 
David P. Lynch— D.A. Off. Sqd. 
Thomas A. Adams— D.A. Off. 
Joseph A. Nardoza — D.A. Off. 
Alfred V. Milani— 40th Sqd. 
Russell L. McVeigh — 42nd Sqd. 
Simon F. Malin— 42nd Sqd. 
Peter P. Gragnola — 42nd Sqd. 
Daniel J. McGowan — Nar. Sqd. 

Patrolmen 

Joseph F. Brickwedde— 17th Pet. 
Charles E. Tones— 28th Pet. 
Robert P. Harris— 19th Pet. 
Vincent B. Gaetano — 83rd Pet. 
-Mfonso C. Bisogno — 83rd Pet. 
Toseph F. O'Connor— 88th Pet. 
Edward J. Gehl— 25th Pet. 
Paul Klein— 2Sth Pet. 
John J. Cassidy— 18th Pet. 
Francis M. Doran — 40th Pet. 
John F. Kiernan-^40th Pet. 
Jack Abrams— 77th Pet. 
Abraham Colien — 77th Pet. 
Frederick T. Reddy— 88th Pet. 
Peter V. Jacina— 88th Pet. 
John J. McLean — Traf . F. 
Adolph T. Rosenberger — 

41st Pet 
Frank F. Manno— 79th Pet. 
Thomas L. Willis— 32nd Pet. 
Clyde R. Butler— 32nd Pet. 
John P. Keeney — 22nd Pet. 
James W. Carroll— 32nd Pet. 
Tohn J. Brady— 32nd Pet. 
Toseph T. Radford— Har. Pet. 
Toseph E. Mahon— 25th Pet. 
Vincent R. Keane— 10th Div. 
.\nthony R. Wallace— 10th Div. 
Matthew M. Cerick— M.T.S. 
Thomas P. Rowan — Traf. D. 
Michael J. Fox — 6th Pet. 
Mark Frances ^2nd Pet. 
Thomas T. Leonard — t2nd Pet. 
Milton R. Spiegel— 40th Pet. 
.\ndrew C. Vogt — Wth Pet. 
Henrv Goldenberg — Traf. I. 



Arthur J. Szablewicz— 79th Pet. 
Richard J. Manning — 25th Pet. 
William H. Barker— E.S.S. 6 
John F. Shepherd— 25th Pet. 
Harry E. Kaiser — 43rd Pet. 
Walter C. Donovan— 28th Pet. 
Daniel J. Boiko— 28th Pet. 
Roosevelt Dunning — 77th Pet. 
Joseph M. Hynes — 82nd Pet. 
William J. Graham— 6th Pet. 
Patrick E. Magner — 6th Pet. 
William T. Grady— G. C. P. Pet. 
Edward P. Gropf— 72nd Pet. 
Elmer F. Vacearo — 72nd Pet. 
Joseph F. McClellan— 7th Pet. 
Harold Doidge— 7th Div. 
Patrick J. Brennan— 20th Pet. 
John F. Walsh— 20th Pet. 
Peter S. Greco— 25tli Pet. 
Thomas J. Normandeau — 

25th Pet. 
Ernest J. Vohs— 19th Pet. 
Tohn K. Sweeney— 19th Pet. 
"Earl W. Jones— 2Sth Pet. (2) 
Walter A. Maxwell— 107th Pet. 
Toseph H. Black— 107th Pet. 
Harold Lee— 7th Pet. 
Maurice Antell— 16th Pet. 
James J. Kane — 16th Pet. 
Arnold M. Pine— 104th Pet. 
Gerard P. Carey— 104th Pet. 
Thomas C. Moore — Traf. A 
Walter F. O'Shea— 22nd Div. 
Robert V. Gardner— 10th Pet. 
Robert T. Winant— 10th Pet. 
William Spengler, Jr.— 19th Pet. 
Alexander S. Szarkowski — 

19th Pet. 
David H. Savage— 19th Pet. 
Michael T. Keiley— 34th Pet. 



Gerard B. Flanagan — 34th Pet. 
Toseph I. Linden— 28th Pet. 
"Tames W. Litkett— 28th Pet. 
"Kenneth J. Fowler— 28th Pet, 
Edward A. Roone\ — 26th Pet. 
Frederick T. Cambria — 8th Pet. 
Francis X. Novak— 8th Pet. 
Edward Cossetta — 6th Pet. 
Murray B. Wagner — 13th Pet. 
Robert C. Simpson — 13th Pet. 
William Thomas— 15th Pet. 
Warren T. Hanlev— 15th Pet. 
Harold J. Fleureton— 107th Pet. 
Robert G. Groppe— 107th Pet. 
Tames J. McGetrick — 32nd Pet. 
"Edward Schatz— 32nd Pet. 
Ernest J. Sykora— 28th Pet. 
Thomas W. Lowe— 28tli Pet. 
Orlando P. Guerci— lOtli Pet. 
Joseph Boshko, Jr.— 30th Pet. 
Curtis E. Moore— 30th Pet. 
Tames M. Marley — 24th Pet. 
"Robert T. Hart— 8th Pet. 
Howard N. Eckert— 25th Pet. 
John J. Harmigan — ^25th Pet. 
Lawrence M. McGuire — 

2Sth Pet. 
Hubert H. Brockhues— 8th Pet. 
William J. O'Rourke— 8th Pet. 
William A. Keane— «th Pet. 
Charles E. Parthesius — 11th Div. 
Joseph C. Swezey — 11th Div. 

MERITORIOUS 
POLICE DUTY 

Captains 

Toseph F. Frey — Boro Hq.M.W. 
Francis J. M. Robb— 6th D.D. 



Breaks Up Policy Game 




PATROLMAN PATRICK J. KENNEDY, 18th Precinct, takes 
down the latest alarms. He received a Meritorious Police Duty 
award for apprehending a youth who had in his possession 
2,825 plays of mutual race horse policy last December 18. This 
arrest led to the apprehension of two policy bankers and 
four collectors, thereby smashing the "numbers" combine. 



— 13 — 



Acting Captains 

Thomas V. HaniiiKan — "tli D.D, 
John J. LanniR^Fiirgery Squad 
Raymond F. Mapriiirc — 

Safe, Loft and Truck Sqd. 
Joseph J. Mcl.aughUn— Dct. 

Bur. Boro. Hq. Bx. Horn. Sqd. 



Lieutenants 

Tohn H. Thompson — 34 Sqd. (3) 
Tliomas J. Curley— 24 Sqd. (2) 
Edward W. Psota— 52nd Pet. 
William A. G. I. Dunn — 

78th Sqd. 
Wilham I. Burrell-Off. of P.C. 
Williams" F. Kevins— 79 Sqd.(3) 
Peter J. Devers— 14th Sqd. 
Francis A. Murphv — 17th Sqd. 
Harry Taylor— 73rd Sqd. 

Acting Lieutenants 

Thomas J. Riggs— 3rd D.D. 
Leonard Gordon — 102nd Sqd. 
Arthur M. Grennan — Narcotic 

Sqd. (2) 
Frederick W. Itschner — 

80th Sqd. 
John W. Muchow— 84th Sqd. 
Louis C. Cottell— Nar. Sqd, (3) 
Francis T. Cassidy — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Walter Casey— Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Herbert T. Klein— Det, Bur. 

Boro Hq. Bx. Horn. Sqd. 
Walter J. Fenn — 43rd Sqd. 

Sergeants 

Tohn S. Robb— 15th Pet. 
Frank T. Woods— 60th Pet. 
Robert E. Luhrs— 23rd Pet. 
Joseph N. Delaney— 81st Pet. 
Henry Wittenberg— 14th Pet. 
Albert A. Secdnian^44th Pet. 



Acting Sergeants 

John F. Cottone — Xar. Sqd. 
"William J. Mulligan — Det. Eur. 
Boro Hq. Man. East 



Detectives 

Joseph D. Kelly 34th Sqd. 
John H. Kellv— 34th Sqd. 
Frank U. Noell— 24th Sqd. (2) 
John P. J. Stedman— Man. W. 

Hom. Sqd. 
Timothy J. Supples— 34 Sqd. (2) 
Thomas J. O'Kane— 34 Sqd. (2) 
Nicholas E. Treanor — 34th Sqd. 
Edward W. Schnaible — 

24th Sqd. 
Francis J. Burns — 24th Sqd. 
Michael J. Lynch— 24lh Sqd. 
Louis J. Behrens — 24th Sqd. 
Julius Shulman — 24th Sqd. 
Robert M. Slavin— 24th Sqd. 
Charles A. Boyle— Bklyn. W. 

Hom. Sqd. 
Samuel Sklar — 78th Sqd. 
Matthew P. Birmingham — 

104th Sqd. 
Thomas E. Gallagher — 

14th Sqd. 
Harold W. Dailey— 14th Sqd. 
David J. Mullee— 14th Sqd. 
William E. Kelly— 32nd Sqd. 
Benjamin F. Page — 32nd Sqd. 
Kathryn B. Barry — Nar. Sqd. 



Joscjili H. Whitclcy — Nar. Sqd. 
Frank Turchiano— Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
John A. Francis — Nar. Sqd. (2) 
Louis J. Daima^Nar. Sqd. 
John C. Maeauley— Nar. Sqd. 
Francis X. Shannon — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Kenneth F". Fagan — ^Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Stephen J. Wall— Safe, Loft 
and Truck Sqd. 
Louis Hall^t7th Sqd. 
Robert D. Kenny— 47th Sqd. 
James F. Niland — 47th Sqd. 
Edward J. Murtagh— Nar. Sqd. 
Isaac Ezagui — -Nar. Sqd. 
John T. North— 24th Sqd. 
Edward C. Tangney — 24th Sqd. 
Tohn T. Wyten— 16th Sqd. 
"CyrifA. Shortle— 16th Sqd. 
James Pritchard — 16th Sqd. 
John W. Kelly^t3rd Sqd. 
Edwin J. Piceo — 43rd Sqd. 
Richard J. Seott— 114th Sqd. 
Edgar H. Sand— 112th Sqd. 
Harold A. Jacob — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Patrick F. Connolly — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Joseph T. MeMahon — 

Safe, Loft and Truck Sqd. 
Frank T. Weber-^2nd Sqd. 
Nicholas J. Cotter — 42nd Sqd. 
Tohn C. Kenny — 17th Sqd. 
"Edward W. Clancy- 17th Sqd. 
Vincent F. Baliunas — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 



John P.. Drahzal — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Ru<;scll L. Krkman — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sc|<l. 
Walter V. Morrissey — 3rd Sqd. 
Joseph Di Giovanni — D.D. Boro. 

Hq. Rich. 
Thomas T. Crane — D.D. Boro. 

Hq. Rich. 
Vincent T. Hefferen— 23 Sqd. (2) 
Martin j. Zinkand— 23 Sqd. (2) 
Frank A. Malerba— 23 Sqd. (2) 
John O'Neill— 8th Sqd. 
Peter J. Hynes, Jr.— 8th Sqd. 
Charles J. Kelly— Bklyn. W. 

Riverfront Sqd. 
John W. Sheridan— 84th Sqd. 
Carl A. Johnson — 84th Sqd. 
Clarence A. Sherman — Bklyn. 

W. Youth Sqd. 
Jay J. Parmcnter — 44th .Sqd. 
Joseph T. Corrigan — 44th Sqd. 
William C. McHugh-^t4th Sqd. 
Marco J. De Serio — Nar. Sqd. 
Frank Martorella — Nar. Sqd. 
Harold J. Kelly— 73rd Sqd. (2) 
Robert H. Green — 73rd Sqd. 
George Ravens— 73rd Sqd. (2) 
Ferdinand L. Benincasa — 

7th Sqd. 
Andrew Cilenti — 7th Sqd. 
Frank W. Wolff— 43rd Sqd. 
Thomas Durkin — 43rd Sqd. 
Tohn J. Mulcahy — 41st Sqd. 
Frank W. Cresci— B.O.S.S.I. 
John F. Molloy^l7th Sqd. 
James F. Niland — 47th Sqd. 



Team Work in Water Rescue 




PATROLMAN JAMES J. KELLY, JR., 18th Precinct, reaches for 

a barge hand who fell into the North River on February 10. 

Kelly and his radio motor patrol partner, Anthony F. Canestra, 

received Meritorious Police Duty awards for the rescue. 



Vincent A. McCarthy — 

83rd Sqd. 
William J. Farrell— 83rd Sqd. 
Benjamin Topolka — 28th Sqd. 
James B. Freeman — 28th Sqd. 
Felix J. Donegan — 28th Sqd. 
James V. Horah— 28th Sqd. 
Joseph E. Penna — Nar. Sqd. 
Donald S. Collins — Nar. Sqd. 
Arthur W. Damica— 19th Sqd. 
Andrew F. Dunleavy — 19th Sqd. 
Raymond C. Clyne — 

Forgery Sqd. 
John C. Lcffler — Forgery Sqd. 
Richard H. Weber — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Stephen J. Wall— Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Thomas F. Sullivan — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
James J. Vinci — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Russell S. Zacka — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
James J. Cusick — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
William F. Matchin, Jr. — 

73rd Sqd. 
Francis J. Pilon— 79th Sqd. (2) 
Norman P. Steier— 79 Sqd. (2) 
William J. Curnan — 79th Sqd. 
Henry P. Senna — 79th Sqd. 
Sidney Wasserman — 79 Sqd. (2) 
Michele J. MarzuUo — 79th Sqd. 
Edward F. Maney — Safe, Loft- 

and Truck Sqd. 
Thomas M. Berry — Safe, Loft 

and Truck Sqd. 
Walter I. Rickard— 102nd Sqd. 
William E. Conf rey — Nar. Sqd. 

(2) 
Belmont Cohen — Nar. Sqd. 
Joseph J. Nolan — Nar. Sqd. (2) 
George A. Rannie, Jr. — 

Nar. Sqd. 
Tames Oleska — 64th Sqd. 
John P. O'Brien— 64th Sqd. 
D. Richard Mazzone — 64th Sqd. 
John V. Drennan — 62nd Sqd. 
Frank R. Ginsburg— 80th Sqd. 
Martin P. Flanagan— 80th Sqd. 
Michael T. Arrasate— 84th Sqd. 
Michael V. W illis— 84th Sqd. 
William H. Mulligan— 14th Sqd. 
Joseph L. Maguire — 14th Sqd. 
Frederick G, Kuhner — 41st Sqd. 
James J. Sullivan — Det. Bur. 

Boro. Hq. Bx. Hom. Sqd. (2) 
George Egner — Det. Bur. Boro. 

Hq. Man. East 
John T. Mullins— Det. Bur. 

Boro. Hq, Man. East 
William Mullcr— 108th Sqd. 
John Levis— 108th Sqd. 
James Marklej — •18th Sqd. 
Edwin Donlin— 18th Sqd. 
Terry Valente — Nar. Sqd. 
Alfred B. Spinosa— Nar. Sqd. 
Laurette C. McDonnell — 

Nar. Sqd. 
Mabel L. Thomas — ^Nar. Sqd. 
James J. Fitzpatrick — 42nd Sqd. 
Eugene J. Baccaclini — 42nd Sqd. 
Alfred F. Garcia-42nd Sqd. (2) 
Raymond Ott— 79tli Sqd, 
Calvesta L. Davie — 79th Sqd. 
Walter J. Colt— 72nd Sqd. 
Tlmmas F. Horan — 72nd Sqd. 
Martin A. Walsh, Jr.— 18th Sqd. 
Edward G. Clarke— Det. Bur. 

Bx. Youth Sqd. 
Francis A. Crowley — Det, Bur. 

Boro, Hq, B.k. Hom. Sqd. 
^Continued on page 26) 



— 14 — 



TOP COMMAND 



SKETCHES OF TOP-RANKING MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 



Now assigned to the Police Commissioner's Office, In- 
spector John H. Mitchell was born in Harlem, from 
where his family moved to Ridgewood, New Jersey. He at- 
tended high school there and later Drake Business School in 
Paterson. . . . After the family re- 
turned to New York City, his father 
became a policeman on the Lower 
East Side. . . . Employed as a bank 
stenographer prior to joining the 
force, the inspector also wrote sports 
and society news for the Ridgewood 
News. . . . He and his wife, Elizabeth, 
celebrated their twenty-fifth wedding 
anniversary last October. They have 
lived in Flatbush for about fifteen 
John H, Mitchell years. . , . Appointed in 1924, he was 

promoted to sergeant in 1935, to lieutenant in 1940, to cap- 
tain in 1947 and to deputy inspector in 1950. He was raised 
to his present rank on November 19, 1951. . . . Besides 
patrol, he has also served in the Quartermaster's Office in 
charge of the department storehouse on Sixth Avenue. . . . 
A semi-pro baseball and basketball player in New Jersey 
prior to his department days, he is a Yankee fan. 




A NATIVE of Brooklyn, whose family moved to Staten 
■^*- Island when he was a boy. Inspector John J. Jones is 
the commanding officer of the Juvenile Aid Bureau. His 
first schooling was received in St. Joseph's Parochial School 

Sin Brooklyn. It was continued in Rich- 
mond at Our Lady of Grace High 
School. . . . Employed earlier as a 
paymaster by Armour and Company 
in Manhattan, he joined the force on 
June 2, 1926. . . . Assigned to the 
Juvenile Aid Bureau in 1945, he be- 
came its head upon promotion to 
captain in 1947. . . . He has long been 
interested in the youth of the 
city, particularly the underprivileged 
youngsters and was recently elected 
John J. Jones j^ jj^^ ^^^^ ^f president of the "Police 

Conference on Youth Activities," an organization embrac- 
ing the Youth Bureaus of the police departments of twentj-- 
four major cities in this section of the country. . . . He and 
his wife. Vera, a native of Jersey City, whom he married 
in 1932, reside in the Bronx and are the parents of two 
daughters. Veronica, 19, a graduate of St. Barnabas High 
School and the Berkeley School of Secretarial Training is 
presently employed as a secretary, and Dolores, 15, is a 
student at St. Simon Stock High School. . . . Very active in 
departmental organizations during his twenty-six years 
service, he has been vice president of the Holy Name So- 
ciety (Manhattan. Bronx and Richmond) and second vice 
president of the Captains' Endowment Association. . . . He 
is a member of St. Raymond's Council of the Knights of 
Columbus. ... A rabid Yankee rooter, he also likes to fish. 



APPOINTED to the department thirty-three years ago. In- 
spector James P. Dermody is presently assigned to 
the 13th Division in the Bronx. ... A product of York- 
ville, his family moved to the Morrisania section of 
the Bronx when he was still a baby. 
. . . Attended school at St. Augustine's, 
Morris High School and New York 
I'reparatory. ... A salesman for Bor- 
den's Farm Products before entering 
the department, he has served mostly 
in the Detective Division. . . . He was 
also assigned to the Chief Inspector's 
Office, and on the Police Commis- 
sioner's Investigating Squad as a 
sergeant, lieutenant and captain. In 
1935-36 he was assigned to the Sales 
Tax Squad under the City Comptroller. . . . Married in 1914 
to the former Ann Hepburn, he has lived for the last ten 
years in Parkchester. . . . His only son, Vincent J., has been 
an assistant District Attorney of New York County for the 
last twelve years. He is a graduate of Xavier High School, 
Fordham College and the Fordham School of Law. ... A 
member of the Elks, Knights of Columbus, Anchor Club 
and the Holy Name Society, the inspector also likes base- 
ball. However, he claims his main hobby is his grand- 
children. 




James P. Dermody 



A policeman's son, Inspector Cornelius J. Lyons, entered 
the department on April 30, 1919 after World War I 
service with Company A, 306th Infantry of the 77th Di- 
vision. As a member of that outfit he went through the St. 
Mihiel, Oise-Aisne and the Argonne 
campaigns. . . . Born on Manhattan's 
West Side, he attended Sacred Heart 
Parochial School on West 51st Street 
and St. Francis Xavier High School. 
. . . Before becoming a cop, he was a 
postal clerk. ... A brother, also a 
patrolman, was wounded in a gun 
battle with holdup men in 1931. He 
never fully recovered and died in 
1938. . . . With his wife, Kathleen, 
Inspector Lyons lives in the Inwood 
section. . . . Their only child, a boy, Cornelius, Jr., 21, is a 
student at St. John's Law School. He graduated from Ford- 
ham in 1950 at the age of nineteen. ... A member of the 
uniformed force throughout his service in the department, 
the inspector has done duty in all parts of the city, but most 
of his time has been spent in Manhattan. . . . He holds two 
Commendations and an Excellent Police Duty. ... A mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus, the Anchor Club and the 
Holy Name Society he also belongs to the department line 
organizations and to Police Post 460 of the Ameri- 
can Lesion. 




Cornelius J. Lyons 



— 15 



j^Hjhe haif\6 Wctk 



ON-THE-SPOT ARRESTS 




\cws fhotos 



CiniMr\Ai,s foiinil it lough fioinp in 
-i New \ ork (liiririfi the past weeks, 
;i> <|uifk actioti hv police officers led 
to oii-lhc-spol apprehen^'ion and ar- 
rest of nialefactorB. At left : Officers 
from the 8th Precinct frisk two men, 
who, posing as police officers, at- 
teiiii»te(l to make a false arrest. Yells 
of tlieir victim hrought immediate 
police action resulting in their arrest 
at the scene. Police officers, left to 
right: Patrolmen Walter Wilson, 
James M. Kelly and George Raniola, 
Motorcycle Precinct No. 2. 

Below, left: Three men who at- 
tempted to hold up a restaurant in 
the Broadway area were apprehend- 
ed by alert police officers of the 16th 
Precinct who converged on the scene. 
Left to right: Patrolmen John Urban- 
ski, Kenneth Walters, Martin Mc- 
Cooey, George McAuliffe and Jerome 
Rosenthal. 

Below center: Patrolman Richard 
Farrell, 47th Precinct, frisks three 
men who were apprehended while 
trying to steal automobiles. His part- 
ner. Patrolman Charles Turchi, stands 
guard with drawn gun. 

Below, right: Plainclothes Patrol- 
man Joseph Swezey, 11th Division, 
frisks four hoodlums who shot up a 
bar in the Bronx. Patrolman Charles 
Parthesius assists him. 




A DOPE peddler found that "holding 
'^^*- the bag" can be a very dangerous 
procedure when he was arrested by 
Patrolman Gerard E. Martin of the 
Narcotic Squad on March 3. The sus- 
picions of Patrolman Martin were 
aroused when he saw the peddler step 
into a doorway and examine the con- 
tents of a paper bag. Since one o'clock 
in the morning was hardly a sensible 
time for such an occupation, Patrolman 
Martin decided he would have a look- 
see also. He looked and saw twelve 
decks of heroin. 

The dope peddler said he was look- 
ing because an unknown man had given 
him $50 to hold the bag for him and 
he had become curious about the con- 
tents. His story fell apart when he 
offered Martin the sum of $10,000 to 
let him go. Net result was that an 
additional charge of attempted bribery 
was placed against the seller. 



np wo burglars who jimmied the win- 
dow of a drugstore basement on 
the night of February 25, overlooked 
the fact that what they could get 
through the police could, too. As 
a result, two young men wound up with 
charges of burglary and assault placed 
against them. 

The two radio motor patrol teams of 
Patrolmen Edward Lehane, Harvey 
Jacobson, Frank Brinker and George 
Lucas, 103rd Precinct, responded to an 

Mirror Photos 



alarm that there were suspicious noises 
in an alleyway behind a drugstore. 
Upon reaching the scene, the patrol- 
men discovered the jimmied window 
and the faint glow of a flashlight in 
the basement. The officers slipped 
through the window and into the dark- 
ness of the basement. The burglars 
attempted to get out by the staircase 
leading to the store but were brought 
down by flying tackles. 

The fight continued in the darkness 
and soon the criminals were subdued. 
When the lights went on, cases of 
cigars and cigarettes were found neat- 
ly stacked near the window for a quick 
getaway by the thieves. A stolen truck 
was found nearby in which it had been 
planned to move the loot. 



t~^ REY suede gloves, generally the 
sign of a well-dressed man, put 
the finger on a young burglar when 
he was apprehended on March 16 by 
Patrolmen Robert Groppe and Harry 
Fleurton, 107th Precinct. A series 
of burglaries, marked by an absence 
of fingerprints in the Jamaica Estates 
area caused the two officers to be 
suspicious of the well-dressed man, 
complete to gloves, who strolled down 
Avon Road. They slowed their R.M.P. 
car to take a better look at the sus- 
pect who gave away the game by 
beginning to run. He was quickly 
apprehended and found to have $300 



in his pocket. 

He admitted later to having broken 
into a home just ten minutes before 
l)cing apprehended. The burglar 
operated by selecting homes he knew 
were empty. He would ring the door- 
bell and if there was no answer, would 
proceed to remove a pane of glass 
from a window and gain entrance. 
He carried a screwdriver to remove 
the putty. The prisoner admitted 
having burglarized twenty homes 
during the past two months. 



P .■\TROLM.'\x Joseph Ward, Emer- 
gency Service Squad 10, made use 
of an ambulance on March 23 to ap- 
prehend two youths who were riding 
in a stolen automobile. Ward, tem- 
porarily assigned as an attendant in 
the Police Department ambulance, was 
riding in the rear compartment down 
the East River Drive after having 
responded to a call when he saw a car 
weaving in and out of traffic. 

Ward called on the ambulance driver 
to pursue the car which turned off at 
the 34th Street exit. Near First Ave- 
nue, the ambulance caught up when the 
car became stalled in traffic. Four 
youths jumped from the vehicle and 
began running. Ward chased them and 
after firing one shot from his revolver, 
two of the youths stopped. The car 
was found to be stolen and both were 
held on charges of grand larceny. 




— 17 — 



ALL IN THE DAYS' WORK 

(Continued) 

npHE value of woineu in police 
■*■ work Wiis iimj)ly liciiioiistratcd on 
Fehniaiv 28 wlu-n vcician Detective 
Anne Orr and rookie Policewoman 
Lillian Smith of the Pickpocket anil 
Confidence Stpiad appreliended two 
women who had been operatin;; a 
conlidence game in (^)iicensi. 

The racket which is described in 
detail in a feature article in this 
issue, was an '"oldie" involving a 
found purse containing a large sum 
of money. The operators offer to 
share it with their victim, provided 
she puts up a large sum of money to 
show her good faith, l^pon obtaining 
the money, the operators flee. 

The Jamaica area had for several 
months been plagued with a series of 
such games, the victims invariably 
being elderly women. Members of 
the Pickpocket and Confidence Squad 
were alerted to be on the lookout for 
suspects who frequented the shop- 
ping areas. Detective Orr. who has 
twenty years of service and Police- 
woman Smith, who has three months 
of 8er\-ice, became suspicious of two 
women who had approached a third 



in a five and ten cent store. They 
got close enough to listen to the con- 
versation and when they discovered 
the talk to be about a "found" purse 
and "security." they stepped in and 
arrested two of the women. 

Their suspicions were correct. The 
two jierpetrators were identified by 
other \ jctims. A check on their records 
showed that they were wanted in 
twenty other cities on similar charges. 
Detective Orr and Policewoman 
Smith have been recommended for 
departmental recognition by Acting 
Captain Daniel Campion of the Pick- 
pocket and Confidence Squad. 



"D ESPONDiNG to a radio alarm on 
•*■*■ March 1 to ascertain the reason 
for a woman's screaming, Patrolmen 
Gilbert Rigoulot and Peter Jacina, 
88th Precinct, succeeded in reviving a 
dentist who had been overcome by 
escaping gas fumes. Arriving at the 
house, the team discovered that the 
man's wife had become hysterical when 
she discovered him lying senseless on 
the floor. Her screams had been over- 
heard by a passerbv. 



ASSISTANCE FOR AUTO VICTIM 




Mirror Photo 

A WOMAN INJURED in an automobile accident is carried to a waiting ambulance by 
(left to right) Patrolmen Michael Moloney, Charles Schwarz, Edward O'Neill, and 

Arthur Mohony, 13lh Precinct. 



'1 lie two officers immediately started 
to give the unconscious man artificial 
respiration which was continued with 
the arrival of the Emergency Service 
Squad and its portable inhalator equip- 
ment. He regained consciousness and 
was removed to the hospital for fur- 
ther treatment. 



A MAN who was overcome on March 
16 while trying to put out a fire 
in his apartment, owes his life to 
Patrolman James Marley of the 24th 
Precinct. Marley who had noticed the 
smoke as he passed by, raced through 
the building warning occupants to get 
out. \\'hcn he got to the fifth floor 
where the fire was raging, he found 
the man in a state of collapse. The 
officer not only dragged him to safety 
but was able to pick up a dog that had 
been left behind and rescued it too. 



T>T an ingenious appeal to the ma- 
ternal instincts of a mother bent 
on suicide. Patrolmen Alexander 
Gray and Patrick Riffone, 24th Pre- 
cinct, were able to drag her to safety 
after she had threatened to jump 
from the roof of a five story building 
on March 18. Answering a call re- 
layed by a neighbor, the R.M.P. team 
rushed to the roof of the building 
to find the woman seated on the 
parapet with her legs over the side. 
As the officers approached, she shout- 
ed that she would jump if they came 
any nearer. 

The patrolmen started a conversa- 
tion with her and asked if she had 
any children. She said that two were 
in the apartment. Patrolman Gray 
then said he would go and see if 
they were all right. He pretended to 
leave the roof while Kiffonc kept the 
woman engaged in conversation. Gray 
suddenly appeared on the far side of 
tiie roof in back of tiie woman and 
shouted "I can't find your kids, lady. 
They're not in the apartment.*' 
(taught by surprise, the woman turned 
her head at which point Hiffone 
rushed forward and grabbed her. 
Together both officers pulled the 
woman to safety. She was removed 
to the hospital for examination and 
observation. 



— 18- 



NEW ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION TECHNIQUE OF RED CROSS 



THE American Red Cross, which has been instructing proba- 
tionary patrolmen in first aid courses at the Police Academy 
since 1946, has discarded the Schaefer method of artificial 
respiration formerly taught. In its place, the Red Cross has 
adopted the Holgar Nielson method, named after the Danish 
army instructor who devised the technique in 1932. The new 
method, sometimes referred to as back-pressure arm-lift, is now 
being taught to all probationers at the Academy. 

The basic difference between the Schaefer and the Nielson 
method is that the latter is a two phase operation— the air is 



forced into the lungs as well as expelled. The prone pressure 
method, devised by Schaefer, forced the air out, but de- 
pended on the elastic recoil of the chest and other organs 
to bring air into the lungs. Extensive testing has shown the 
new Nielson method to be superior particularly in cases of 
deep asphyxia. Readers should note that, while the patient is 
placed in a prone position similar to that used in the Schaefer 
method, the operator does not assume a position astride the 
body, but takes his position kneeling at the head and facing 
the body of the patient. 



POSITION OF THE SUBJECT 



POSITION FOR EXPANSION PHASE 




1. Place the subject In the 
face down, prone position. Bend 
his elbows and place the hands 
one upon the other. Turn his 
face to one side, placing the 
cheek upon his hands. 




4. Release the pressure, avoid- 
ing a final thrust, and commence 
to rock slowly backward. Place 
your hands upon the subject's 
arms just above his eibo>^. 




POSITION OF THE OPERATOR 

2. Kneel on either the right 
or left knee at the head of the 
subject facing him. Place the 
knee at the side of the subject's 
head close to the forearm. Place 
the opposite foot near the elbow. 
If it is more comfortable, kneel 
on both knees, one on either 
side of the subject's head. Place 
your hands upon the flat of the 
subject's back in such a way that the heels lie just below a 
line running between the armpits. With the tips of the thumbs 
just touching, spread the fingers downward and outward. 

COMPRESSION PHASE 

3. Rock forward until the arms 
are approximately vertical and 
allow the weight of the upper 
part of your body to exert slow, 
steady, even pressure down- 
ward upon the hands. This forces 
air out of the lungs. Your elbows 
should be kept straight and the 
pressure exerted almost directly 
downward on the back. 



EXPANSION PHASE 




5. Draw his arms upward and 
toward you. Apply just enough 
lift to feel resistance and tension 
at the subject's shoulders. Do 
not bend your elbows, and as 
you rock backward the subject's 
arms will be drawn toward you. 
Then drop the arms to . the 
ground. This completes the full 
cycle. The arm lift expands the 
chest by pulling on the chest 
muscles, arching the back, and 
relieving the weight on the chest. 



CYCLE TIMING 

The cycle should be repeated 12 iimes per minute at a 
steady, uniform rate. The compression and expansion phases 
should occupy about equal time; the release periods being of 
minimum duration. 




ADDITIONAL RELATED DIRECTIONS 



It is all important that artificial respiration, when needed, 
be started quickly. There should be a slight inclination of the 
body in such a way that fluid drains better from the respiratory 
passage. The head of the subject should be extended, not 
flexed forward, and the chin should not sag lest obstruction of 
the respiratory passages occur. A check should be made to 
ascertain that the tongue or foreign objects are not obstructing 



the passages. These aspects can be cared for when placing 
the subject into position or shortly thereafter, between cycles. 
A smooth rhythm in performing artificial respiration is desirable, 
but split-second timing is not essential. Shock should receive 
adequate attention, and the subject should remain recumbent 
after resuscitation until seen by a physician or until recovery 
seems assured. 



— 19 — 



r-r' 




^x'lVX: 



WITH a .38 slug through my face . . . it will be all over 
before I hit the floor. . . . The ivorst of it is. . . . 

I first saw Joe in a drug store. As Joe passed the 
counter, he glanced in my direction, giving me an approving 
look. After continuing on his way for a few paces, he 
returned, and as the expression goes, "picked me up !" 
Since then, and it's seven years now, Joe has never regret- 
ted it. Although we were worlds apart in most respects, 
one thing was certain : without him, I was useless ; without 
me, Joe's life would be a hodge-podge, completely mixed 
up. He needed me that much. 

Tonight, Joe had been sleeping. Beneath his pillow lay 
his .38 police service revolver and shield. Four years ago, 
last month, Joe stood departmental trial for failing to safe- 
guard his revolver and shield which were burglarized while 
he slept in this very room. He was fined three days' pay. 
Thereafter, he always "slept" on his gun and shield, "just 
to play it safe." 

It had snowed heavily at eleven. The mof)nless night hung 
in the atmosphere in a muffled silence. A mantle of grey 
mist cloaked the world with a sullen and leadening effect. 

At a quarter to three in the morning, I was still bustling 
with activity, internally, that is, although my strength was 
waning rapidly enough to quiet me long before the break of 
dawn. This was the second night since I've known Joe that 
he had failed me. Not that he is to be criticized. The poor 
guy had an all-day school crossing today, and a three-alarm 
fire on his post, to boot. When he came home, there were 
the breakfast dishes still waiting for him — and supper to 
prepare. I was unable to move about, and as customary, 
]()u had confined me to the bedroom. After washing tlie 
supper dishes, he spent some time getting his hunting equip- 
ment ready, and was in bed fast asleep by ten. For tomor- 
row was his "forty-eight," and the boys were going hunting. 
They had planned to get an early start. 



THE ENl 



PTL. CAR\ 



Juc spoke not a word all evening. He seemed deeply 
jireoccupied, probably dreaming about that pretty redhead 
whom he met recently at a church bazaar. Twice he cast 
sidewise glances at me. Had he been visualizing her in this 
apartment, doing for him the things around the house which 
were beyond my limited powers to do ? Since she entered 
the picture, Joe's seen less and less of me. Some evenings 
he didn't come home until well after two. Her intrusion 
into Joe's life, if permanent, would mean that I. . . . 

The window ! A dark form was dimly silhouetted there. 
Was the episode of four years ago to be re-enacted? Not 
if Joe's foresight could help it. As a measure of added 
security, he had installed a jimmy-proof lock expressly to 
preclude such an event. 

Surprisingly, though, the form at the window withdrew 
a glass cutter from his clothing and was describing a ten- 
inch circle on the window pane, just above the latch. The 
grating hiss of the cutter on glass sounded like escaping 
steam from a safety valve on a steam locomotive. But Joe 
slept on beside me. 

The form at the window took a roll of adhesive tape 
from his pocket and cut two large strips from the roll. 
These strips he crossed over the circle he had inscribed on 
the glass. I gazed in silent fascination as with his fist he 
dealt the glass a sharp blow. With an equally sharp snap, 
the circle of glass popped inward, the adhesive tape pre- 
venting it from falling to the floor with a shattering crash. 
The figure deftly removed the tape and the severed circular 
piece of glass from the pane. A ten-inch hole in the window 
gaped at me, and almost instantly, a gush of cold air 
traversed the room and swirled across my face. 

The noise thus far created by the sinister figure had 
fallen far short of rivalling the sound of Joe's rhythmic 
breathing. Joe hadn't budged. An arm was inserted in the 
opening, and in seconds, the "burglar-proof" latch was 
opened. I could feel the strength draining from my sys- 
tem. I wanted so desperately to awaken Joe to the impend- 
ing danger before it was too late. But how to warn him ? 
I was voiceless . . . and my hands could only move at a 
tantalizingly slow pace. Of course! The bell directly over 
my body ! Many a time 1 had used that bell to call Joe's 
attention to me. My right hand long since had started its 
upward swing toward the bell. How maddening to see what 
little progress I had made. Would my energy last? 

The figure was quietly struggling to release the frozen 
window when it suddenly yielded with what seemed a 
deafening roar. The noise fell silently on Joe's impervious 
ears. All was still in the room for a moment except for the 
undulation of the blankets, induced by Joe's heavy breath- 



20- 



OF TIME 



th Precinct 



ing. There was a picture of Joe standing departmental trial 
again, this time with a "ten-day rip," or worse, in the 
making. My hand was still coursing its wearj' way slowly, 
ever so slowly. But not for a single second had it faltered 
in its agonizing crawl upward. 

The burglar was in the room. Would he stumble over 
the ash-tray stand which lay directly in his path ? He skirted 
it without mishap. He neared the bed. His fedora hat was 
pulled low, and in spite of the snow and cold outside, he 
wore sneakers. His dark-colored windbreaker did not con- 
ceal the bulge in Kis hip-pocket. According to Joe, a cheap 
house-breaker seldom packed a rod ! He eyed Joe nervously. 
Satisfied that Joe was asleep, he cast his eyes toward me 
and peered intently into my face. While I was positive he 
could detect no movement on my part, I was sure that the 
pounding inside me could be heard throughout the room. 
The church bells solemnly pealed three o'clock. At last he 
refocused his attention on rifling the bureau drawers on 
Joe's side of the bed. 

Just a few more seconds now, and my hand would be in 
a position to enable me to warn Joe. The burglar finished 
stuffing his pockets with a few articles and personal trinkets 
which Joe kept around. He gave the bed a parting survey 
as he started toward the window. He was half way across 
the room when suddenly the bell was ringing ! My whole 
being vibrated in tune with its shrill sound. The room 
exploded with its jangling and insistent demands for Joe's 



attention. The burglar whirled and froze rigidly in his 
tracks, startled beyond all description. His wide, frightened 
eyes were fastened upon me. For an interminable length of 
time he stood thus transfixed. 

Joe was stirring! Lazily, reluctantly, and with an expres- 
sion of absolute annoyance, bordering on hatred, he slowly 
turned toward me. He stretched out his hand, not so much 
to acknowledge that he heard me, but in a gesture designed 
to silence me — forever. I continued ringing, violently. 

With a superhuman effort, the burglar released himself 
from the initial impact of fear and bewilderment, and sud- 
denly was transformed into a mass of high-voltage activity. 
He whipped out his gun, wheeled and raced for the window, 
knocking over with a loud clatter the ash-tray stand which 
he had avoided when entering the room. 

The clatter of the fallen stand shocked Joe into a reali- 
zation that something was amiss in the room. Joe's intuitive 
reactions to that jolting realization belied his weight. In one 
sweeping movement he dug deep under his pillow, grabbed 
his bolstered gun, and fell to his knees beside the bed. He 
wasn't fully awakened yet as he knelt there on the floor 
removing gun from holster. His eyes went searching around 
the room for the source of trouble. But what trouble, or 
where, he couldn't determine, the effects of his deep sleep 
still lingered. 

The burglar reached the window and had one foot out- 
side when Joe finally spotted him. In typical cop lingo, he 
shouted, "Stop you dirty punk, or I'll shoot." The burglar 
shot first. The bullet whistled over Joe's head . . . striking 
me in the face. The young thief made a perfect target as 
he stood momentarily straddling the window sill, his frame 
profiled against the night sky. Joe fired twice in response. 
The would-be burglar slowly crumbled. . . . The worst of 
it is that because of that "dirty punk" I'll never get to see 
Joe's redhead. 

Joe had no doubt that the burgl-ar was a D.O.A. He went 
to the other side of the bed and picked up the alarm clock 
zvhich the deceased's zi'ild shot had knocked off the night 
fable. Joe patted it affectionatelv as he gazed long and 
sileiilly at the bullet hole through its dial. 




INSPECTOR BOYLAN KILLED BY FALLING PLANE 




INSP. BOYLAN'S FUNERAL CORTEGE attended by a large 
police contingent arrives at St. Bartholomew's R. C. Church. 



Tnspector Thomas V. Boylan, Commanding Officer of 
■*■ the 22nd Division in Queens, was killed instantly while 
on duty April 5 when his Police Department car was struck 
by the fallin},^ parts of a cargo airplane which crashed into 
several buildings in the heart of Jamaica. Miraculously, 
his chauffeur, Patrohnan Walter Shea, sustained minor in- 
juries only. A veteran of thirty years service with the 
department, the inspector's loss will be felt keenly. He had 
previously commanded the 10th Division in Harlem where 
he had established a fine reputation in the community. In 
honor of his service there, a large delegation of Harlem's 
business and professional people attended his funeral, held 
on April 8. 

Known as a fine police officer, the inspector won his 
first commendation in 1925, when he stopped a runaway 
horse and saved a crowd of pedestrians from being tram- 
pled. In 1946, he distinguished himself again by bringing 
down a heavily-armed stick-up man with a flying tackle, a 
few minutes after the thug had held up a bar and shot two 
policemen who tried to apprehend him. 

The inspector entered the department in 1922, became 
a sergeant in 1932, a lieutenant in 1937, a captain in 1943, 
a deputy inspector in 1947 and an inspector in 1951. He 
is survived by his wife, Antoinette, and his daughter, Dor- 
othv Ann. 



P.D. - RETIRED — P.D. 



The following retirement applications were approved by the 
Board of Trustees of the Pension Fund at its meeting of 
March 24: 

Dofe 
Name Appointed Command 

SERGEANTS 

Jacob J. Samuel 
Henry A. Pauze 
Lawrence J. Berrill 
Thomas J. O'Brien 
Bernard F. Reilly 



Emil N. A. Panevino 
Patrick O'Keefe 
Joseph A. Brady 
Charles Lenz 
L. A. Brandenburger 
Joseph R. Kolle 
Frederick J. Smith 
John T. Plate 
Edward J. Valentine 
James P. Pettit 
James S. Simms 
Thomas E. Brennan 
John O. Felchlin 
James M. Rooney 
Thomas S. McNicholas 
Russell J. MacKay 
Dionysius A. Eturospe 
Samuel R. Kirwon 
Daniel J. Kelly 



Aug. 


28 


1913 


94th Pet. 


Feb. 


20, 


1928 


1st Pet. 


Jan. 


31 


1930 


110th Pet. 


Jan. 


20 


1927 


15th Pet. 


Nov. 


16 


1916 


47th Pet. 


PATROLMEN 




Oct. 


9 


1911 


2nd D.D. 


May 




1919 


Traf. E 


June 


n 


1912 


D.D. Boro. Hq. Bx. 


Oct. 


28 


1912 


Traf. D 


Feb. 


21 


1913 


102nd Pet. 


Oct. 




1931 


64th Pet. 


Dec. 




1931 


24th Pet. 


Dec. 




1931 


41st Pet. 


Oct. 




1931 


10th D.D. 


Oct. 




1931 


M.T.S. 


Dec. 




1931 


M.S.B. 


June 


25 


1931 


23rd Pet. 


Oct. 


14 


1930 


106th Pet. 


Feb. 


15 


1927 


67th Pet. 


Oct. 


28 


1919 


Traf. J 


Dec. 


26 


1917 


18th Pet. 


Jan. 


17 


1923 


13th Pet. 


May 


1 


1928 


15th Pet. 


July 


11 


1923 


Traf. L 



Bernard J. Murphy 
Fred W. Kozireski 
Edward J. Mullare 
John J. Ryan 
Abraham DeKlade 
John Smith 
John J. Griffin 
Bernard J. McGuire 
William H. Ruland 
John C. Mayer 
Edwin J. Mulholland 
James E. King 
Charles C. Donoghue 
Joseph T. Cavano 
Irving B. Cook 
Edward Silberlust 
Andrew A. Blatz 
Lawrence R. Feger 
Daniel J. Cronin 
Thomas J. O'Hearn 
Francis K. Sanders 
John McGurk 
James C. O'Neill 
James F. MeCaul 
Frank I. Johnson 
Roman Bordens 
Thomas J. Lynch 
William G. Phillips 
Lawrence B. Way 
Howard C. Clancy 
James W. Tuomey, Jr. 
Stanley Gwozdo 
Abraham Yudenfriend 



Sept. 


25, 


1930 


D.D.Boro 


Hq.Man.W. 


Sept. 


25, 


1930 




92nd Pet. 


Feb. 


21, 


1928 




Traf. E 


Jan. 


8, 


1931 




Traf. E 


Apr. 


18, 


1921 




22nd Pet. 


Nov. 


22, 


1918 




73rd Pet. 


June 


7, 


1926 




82nd Pet. 


Mar. 


6, 


1925 




102nd Pet. 


Mar. 


26, 


1924 




104th Pet. 


Dec. 


6, 


1928 




110th Pet. 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 




Har. Pet. 


Oct. 


14, 


1930 


D.D. Boro 


Hq.Man.W. 


July 


11, 


1923 


Off. of 


Chief Clerk 


Mar. 


6, 


1925 




1st Pet. 


Feb. 


15, 


1927 




104th Pet. 


Dee. 


12, 


1927 




Traf. O 


Dee. 


28, 


1923 




82nd Pet. 


Apr. 


6, 


1931 




Har. Pet. 


July 


3, 


1925 


D.D.Boro 


.Hq.Man.W. 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 


Cent.OflF.Burs.&Sqds. 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 




71st Pet. 


July 


2, 


1928 




41st Pet. 


Sept 


7, 


1927 




63rd Pet. 


Aug. 


27, 


1925 


Off. of 


Chief Eng. 


Aug. 


25, 


1924 


Off. ol 


4th D.P.C. 


Jan. 


17, 


1927 




Traf. B 


Oct. 


30, 


1926 




Traf. O 


Apri 


8, 


1921 




75th Pet. 


July 


1, 


1931 




5th D.D. 


July 


11, 


1923 




5th D.D. 


Jan. 


2, 


1930 




20th D.D. 


Mar. 


22, 


1929 




92nd Pet. 


Feb. 


21, 


1928 




28th Pet. 



— 22 — 



^o/t^M the ^ine 



News About Police Department Organizations 



PBA BACKS BUDGET 



Tn announcing his budget for the 
-*• fiscal year beginning July 1, 1952, 
Mayor Mncent R. Impellitteri has pro- 
jected expenditures for pay raises and 
for a forty hour week which would 
include policemen. At this writing, the 
budget has not yet been approved but 
indications are that these measures will 
be included in the final draft. 

The pay raise has been based on a 
sliding scale dependent upon the pa- 
trolman's base pay. As formulated, 
the patrolman will receive a twelve per 
cent increase on the first $2000 of his 
salary ; a six per cent raise on the third 
thousand and a five per cent raise on 
the remainder. A patrolman on full 
salary would get a raise of approxi- 
mately $370 a year. 

The PBA points out that these meas- 



ures designed to improve working con- 
ditions for the police department are 
contingent upon the passage of the 
budget as submitted in the executive 
budget. The PBA appearing before 
the Board of Estimate on April 8 
urged that it vote favorably on the ac- 
ceptance. In addition, the PBA pointed 
out that salaries are still low and that 
in order to catch up with the increased 
cost of living, salaries should be $5800. 
The PBA is requesting a salary of 
$5000 per year for patrolman as a 
start in the right direction. Along with 
additional salary increases, a request 
was made for six additional working 
days' vacation, an increase of $300 for 
the police widow's pensions and im- 
mediate increases for pensioners who 
are receiving less than $1200 per year. 



THE POLICEWOMEN'S ENDOWMENT AS- 
SOCIATION will hold its next meeting 
on May 13 at 5 :30 P.M. at the Hotel 
Biltmore at which time final prepara- 
tions will be made for the annual en- 
tertainment and dance to be held on 
May 15 at Manhattan Centre. At this 
meeting there will also be a report on 
the progress made in achieving repre- 
sentation on the Pension and Relief 
Boards. Other matters which will be 
reported on are the improvements 
made in the working conditions at 
Coney Island through the cooperation 
of this department and Park Depart- 
ment ; promotional possibilities ; and 
recommendations for changes in the 
rules governing maternity leaves. All 
members are urged to attend. 

THE TRAFFIC SQUAD BENEVOLENT AS- 
SOCIATION, which was formed in 1908, 
has set out to enlarge its membership. 
Formed to develop a friendly, social 
and fraternal spirit among its mem- 
bers, the association maintains a bene- 
fit fund which has been financially 
sound since its inception. At the pres- 
ent time, benefit payment for death, 
retirement, resignation or dismissal 

— 23 — 



from the department is $700. Dues 
are small and all officers assigned to 
the Traffic Division are urged to join 
their brother officers in the association. 

More than 5,000 members of the 
HOLY NAME SOCIETY OF MANHATTAN, 
BRONX AND RICHMOND attended the 
thirty- fourth Annual Communion Mass 



and Breakfast on Sunday, March 30. 
Celebrant of the Mass held at St. 
Patrick's Cathedral was his Eminence, 
Francis Cardinal Spellman, Archbishop 
of New York. 

Resplendent in dress uniform and 
preceded by the department's band, 
the Holy Name men marched proudly 
down Fifth Avenue and across Forty- 
Fifth Street to the Hotel Astor where 
they were reviewed by Commissioner 
Monaghan, Chief Inspector Rothen- 
gast, Monsignor McCaffrey, and the 
president of the society. Detective Jos- 
eph Kelly. 

Right Reverend Monsignor Joseph 
A. McCaffrey, chaplain of the Holy 
Name Society presided over the break- 
fast as toastmaster. Entertainment 
was provided for by the Police Glee 
Club under the direction of Sergeant 
Edward Dillon and 'Father Joe' who 
• rendered the "Fordham Ram" and 
"School Days." 

The guest speakers included the Rt. 
Rev. John S. Middleton who repre- 
sented Cardinal Spellman : Hon. James 
M. Mclnerney, Assistant United States 
Attorney General ; Rev. Thomas A. 
Dunn, Hayes High School; Fulton 
Oursler, editor. Reader's Digest ; 
Police Commissioner George P. Mon- 
aghan, and the Honorable Vincent 
Impellitteri, Mayor, City of New 
York. 

(Continued on page 25) 



Rev. Thomas A. Dunn of the Cardinal Hayes High School addresses the Holy Name 

Society members at their Annual Communion Mass and Breakfast held on March 30. 

Detective Joseph Kelly, president (seated rear) and Acting Captain Raymond Maguire 

(standing) are interested listeners. More than 5000 attended. 




CONFIDENCE GAMES 

fContinued) 

praisal and he feels he is being cheated 
by getting only $4,000 for the stones. 
His protests are quickly silenced, how- 
ever, when Number 2 threatens to 
notify the police and thr customs 
agents of the smuggled gems. This 
reluctance shown by the sailor con- 
vinces the victim that she is really "in" 
on something, and she is glad to hasten 
to withdraw the necessary money from 
her bank. 

The victim and Number 2 turn the 
money over to the sailor who accepts 
it grudgingly and goes on his way. 
The stones are now turned over to the 
victim who is to keep them overnight. 
She promises to turn over half the 
stones to Number 2 when he brinsjs his 
$2,000 the following day. Of course, 
he never shows up. The victim goes 
back to the jewelry shop where she 
is informed by the real proprietor that 
no such man as she describes was ever 
employed there. She also learns that 
she possesses twelve worthless stones. 

In most cases of this kind, the vic- 
tim never reports the game to the police 
because of shame and fear of arrest. 

The Gypsy Blessing 

Of all confidence games being per- 
petrated today, perhaps the most sin- 
ister is the Gypsy Blessing. The reason ' 
is that the consummation of this fraud 
oftentimes finds the victim not only 
stripped of his life's savings, but in 
a state of mental collapse as well. 

Their tribal customs and training 
dictate the manner in which gypsies 
contact their victims. Some canvass 
from door to door, pretending to sell 
flowers. Some visit office buildings 
looking for gullible business men. The 
most widespread method, however, is 
to approach intended victims through 
the renting of stores in busy neighbor- 
hoods. These stores are called locations 
and their ostensible purpose is the sale 
of books on horoscopes and palmistry. 

People have varying reasons for 
patronizing gypsy "fortune tellers." 
They include superstition, frustration, 
depression, emotional shock, financial 
loss, mental illness, curiosity, intrigue 
or mystic thrill, and finally, ulterior 
motives. Their manner of living and 
mode of dress have tended to shroud 
gypsies with an aura of mystery. Many 
persons erroneously credit them with 
being clairvoyant, with the ability to 
commune with spirits and to admin- 
ister a "gypsy curse." The gypsies 
build this up by their keen knowledge 
of human nature. Although lacking in 
formal education, gypsies are astute 
psychologists and are able to take ad- 
vantage of human frailties. They 



make use of the psychological tech- 
nicjue best calculated to be successful 
with their victims. 

When a man or woman enters a 
gypsy store, their clothing, age, na- 
tionality and mannerisms are carefully 
noted in an effort to determine the 
purpose of the visit. Should the visitor 
desire a "reading," the gypsy, by care- 
ful and clever use of conversation, 
ascertains the nature of the trouble. 
I f the person is found to be susceptible 
to cajolery and suggestion, the gypsy 
lets him know that a "curse" may be 
at the root of all his difficulties, and 
that a blessing may be necessary to 
remove the "evil spirits." A meeting 
is arranged for the following day at 
the store or the home of the g}'psy. 

MOCK DIAMONDS 




THESE STONES may look like the real 
thing. Actually they're just pieces of 
glass used by operators of the "Fake Dia- 
mond" racket to pluck unwary victims. 

Ihe victim is instructed to bring with 
him an egg wrapped in a five-dollar 
bill. 

The patron does as suggested and 
the gypsy explains that persons who 
are cursed always cause a string or a 
hair to appear in an egg they have 
carried. Placing the five-dollar bill in 
full view on the table, she asks the 
victim for a scarf or handkerchief into 
which she breaks the egg. When the 
broken egg is examined on the cloth, 
the yolk is found to contain a long 
black hair or a piece of green stringy 
matter. The gypsy conceals a horse- 
hair or string between her fingers. She 
drops the hair into the egg as she 
breaks it. 

Telling the victim that it has now 
been definitely established that evil 
spirits are present, the gypsy suggests 
a further test to determine whether the 
evil spirits are present in the body of 
the victim. She fills a glass with water 
from the sink and informs the victim 
that water will boil without heat, or 



will change color, whenever the glass 
is placed in contact with the body of 
a person harboring evil spirits or when 
it is breathed upon by such a person. 
I^lacing a cloth tightly over the mouth 
of the glass to prevent the water from 
spilling, the gypsy turns the glass up- 
side down and tells the victim to 
breathe on it. Within a few seconds, 
the water is seen to "boil," and then 
changes in color to a deep blue. Con- 
vinced now that there are such things 
as evil spirits, the victim decides to do 
whatever is necessary to get rid of 
them. The phenomena produced by 
the gypsy are easily explained. She 
causes the water to "boil" by rip.pling 
her fingers against ihe cloth holding 
the water in the glass, the rising air 
bubbles makes the water appear to 
boil. The color of the water changes 
when the gypsy inserts a small amount 
of liquid dye into the water through 
the cloth. 

When the proceedings have been 
concluded for the day, the gypsy re- 
minds the victim to take along the five- 
dollar bill in which the egg originally 
had been wrapped. The victim is 
amazed to find two five-dollar bills on 
the table instead of one. The double 
five-dollar bill scheme is worked by 
the gypsy who places another bill with 
the original one while the znctim's at- 
tention is engaged -with the "boiling 
water" and its changing color. 

Now the gypsy assures the victim 
that all these things — the hair in the 
egg, the boiling and coloring of the 
water, and the additional five dollar 
bill are sure indications that the vic- 
tim's money is the cause of the curse. 
The victim is instructed to return the 
following evening with some dirt swept 
from his house, some earth from 
ground near his home and several bills 
of large denomination from his bank. 
Through the power of suggestion, the 
victim is sure now that he has some 
"curse" that can only be relieved by 
the "Gypsy Blessing." He is warned 
to discuss the cure with no one under 
pain of continuation of the curse. 
(During World War l\ and in the 
present emergency, a variation of the 
money curse is used, when a victim 
is concerned about a loved one re- 
ported missing in action. In such cases, 
the victim is assured that the loved 
one will return upon removal of the 
curse.) 

The following evening, when the 
victim arrives with the dirt, earth and 
bills, as directed, he finds several 
candles burning and the gypsy moan- 
ing in prayer. The gypsy takes the 
bills and the dirt, arranging the dirt in 



— 24- 



a mound on the floor and holding the 
money in her hands. Informing the 
victim that the time for the true test 
is at hand, the gypsy states that if a 
snake comes up through the dirt then 
money is definitely the cause of the 
curse. As the victim watches in the 
dim light of the candles, a small snake 
is seen to rise through the dirt. The 
gypsy then solemnly proclaims that 
money is the cause of the curse and 
the only way to destroy the evil spirit 
is to destroy the money. The victim 
consents and the the gypsy proceeds to 
"tear up" the bills. The snake is seen 
to fall dead and the gypsy goes with 
the victim to the washroom to dispose 
of the torn money — also, incidentally, 
to learn how much money the victim 
has left. The snake used here is an 
artificial one of the type that can be 
purchased in any novelty shop in the 
form of a s